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(Rick Sheeley GWRRA)
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659 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As promised, here is my thread for the resurrection of "dumb-Dumb's Dream".

Dumb-Dumb was my wife's grandfather, who used to ride an early Goldwing and supposedly rode it from Maine to Florida back in the day.... he was infamous around Harrisonburg, VA.....

Specs:

1995 Honda GL1500 SE Anniversary Edition
Pearl White w/ Red leather (aftermarket Corbin Seat red ostrich)
107,000 miles on the dial.


Purchase Price: $1200.00
Estimated parts to get running: $1100.00
Estimated parts for restore: $2200.00

Estimated hours needed:
Me 200 hours :lash:
Welder 2 Hours
Shop 10 hours
Painter 4 hours


:) Purchase condition:

Was running before wiring meltdown
Complete main wiring harness melted
Main harness 95% unwrapped, wires exposed
Apparent Shifter Seal Leak
Small radiator leak (unknown origin at moment)
Sitting for 1.5 years in garage in AZ
Missing Right body panel
Right Passenger floorboard (no Rubber)
Misc. small body pieces missing
glove/storage boxes missing
Broken trunk latches
Dirty and dusty but not bad
Oil on bottom/engine
Brakes work!
Console will light up with enough juice
Speakers trashed, but radio in good shape
Comm system unknown
Gauges intact and appear to work
Fairing damaged (bin area) but fixable


:shock:Discoveries:

Extra battery (for subwoofer/amp)
Gas in tank
Dark, dirty oil
Multiple bad wiring patches
Multiple bad wires
12x10x10 power amp "fiberglassed" into the right saddlebag with melted wires
Hole cut in same saddlebag for subwoofer "speaker"
Holes drilled in left saddlebag (why?)
Leaking left fork
Bad rotors (all)
Broken seat mount (passenger)

So begins the journey....
 

Attachments

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Wild Rhino - Canadian
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591 Posts
Wow, talk about being modified??? You have a boatload of stuff to correct to get it back on the road. But with the help of the people here on the forum, and lots of patience, you can do it.
Good Luck
 

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Senior Smart Aleck
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1,599 Posts
Best of luck to ya!!!:waving:
 

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2,795 Posts
Great project...and well worth the effort as any bike at 100k would similarly require a complete going-through as well.
 

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(Rick Sheeley GWRRA)
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659 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Weekend #1

First weekend's work consisted of sizing up the bike and planning the removal of all the bodywork in order to:

:readit:
  1. Completetly clean the bike inside/out
  2. Inventory all the missing pieces for the bodywork
  3. Size up the extent of the electrical damage and plan removal of the main wiring harness
  4. Plan fluid swaps
  5. Evaluate braking system

The first weekend I removed just enough of the panels and saddle bags to take a decent look at the harness damage, the bodywork, the frame, engine, and controls.


The very first issue was the contents of the saddlebags, The left bag opened easy enough, but the right was being quite a bugger. The cat I bought DDRougette (Mark) from was never able to get the right saddlebag open. I figured it out in about 10 minutes, and inside was a BIG surprise: something about 12x12x8 that was FIBERGLASSED completely into the saddlebag.


At first thought, I was thinking "extra gas tank" or "Trip to Mexico special storage space" (Everybody get that one?) ;) It's AZ bike, so maybe it was ammo storage... anyways, I went for the most reasonable explanation: gas. Trouble was. I couldn't find any fuel lines running to the bag. So I looked under the bag and surprise.... a 10" round hole in the bottom of the bag for a sub-woofer speaker. Mystery solved: Amp and subwoofer, which explained the extra battery, the wires, the FRIED WIRES, and all the extra wires running to the trashed-out speakers.

This was a disheartening start, as I was now going to have to replace both saddlebags ( the left one had multiple holes drilled in it). But I got lucky, and found a set 95 Pearl white bags the next day here in Sacramento (Buddah bless Craigslist!) So off came the bags, the seats, the main console radio, lowers, side panel(left).

The Main harness was bad, really bad. And there were many wiring patches for LED light strips (none soldered or shrink-wrapped). The guy Mark had bought the bike from had added on a funky "relay" to route the power for the amps and lights with all the lines exposed and easily shorted. The ends of the harness had melted, and I had to pry them from the front and rear connection points. But I got lucky: all the damage appeared to be in the main harness, and when I hooked up the battery charger, the console actually lit up , and the radio worked! I also tested the Interstate battery, and amazingly it was holding a charge.

Time in so far: 21 hours

Parts:

Saddlebags (2) 75.00
WD-40 (2 cans) 8.00
Paper towels 5.00

88.00


Cost-to-date:

Bike 1200.00
Trailer Rental 105.00
Parts 88.00

WEEKEND1 1393.00


NEXT: WEEKEND 2 - Clean,clean,clean......
 

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(Rick Sheeley GWRRA)
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659 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Weekend #2



They look so gorgoeus, don't they? TheGoldwing has got to be one of the most beautiful pieces of engineering man has ever produced....


But inside her heart is a dirty, dirty girl :wtf:

Weekend two begins in thundering rainstorms sweeping across Northern Califronia. Inside my humble garage, I have removed all the plastic from the GL1500. The main harness has been disconnected front and back, and is ready to be removed.



It takes most of Saturday to do this, and as the semi-sun is setting, I roll her out to be washed.

Body work removed:

(removed previously)
  • Seats
  • Center console
  • Key Console
  • Radio

  1. Mirrors
  2. Windshield and trim
  3. Upper front covers
  4. Side covers
  5. Headlight
  6. Lower left Front
  7. Lower right front
  8. Left and right Vents
  9. Speaker Panel and fairing top
  10. Cluster and gauges
  11. Front Fairing
  12. Fans (L/R)
  13. Trunk lid
  14. Trunk trim and anntennae
  15. Trunk
  16. Left saddlebag
  17. Right Saddlebag
  18. Front Fork Trim
  19. Rotor Covers
  20. Front fender
  21. Airbox
  22. Rear Plate Panel and trim

I put some gentle detergent in the power washer, and using a medium setting I wash her as best I can. It's mostly dust and grime on the ground, and I manage to get her pretty good except for her underbelly.

OH, did I mention my jack gave out? Yes, my 10-year moto jack finally gave up the ghost, so off to Pep Boys for a new one (99.00).

Cleaning supplies by my side, and a six-roll bundle of paper towels, the manual cleaning began and by 10:30pm I had a decent cleanup done. (notice the big pile of rags in the pic above).

I used a citrus based cleaner for most of the frame and parts, but for the greasy underbelly, I used a mild version of grill/oven cleaner to foam away the crud. This worked well and did not compromise the metal or plastic.



So Far my missing parts list and replacements is pretty short. I go two sets of Japanese metrics from Cycle Gear, and I will hit Ace Hardware for the rest.

Remember how I said the brakes were working? Well, the rotors are pretty worn so they'll have to be replaced (You could actually feel the convex curve of the rotor surfaces, front and back. But no leaks, and the pads are worn but solid.



Finally, out with that damaged harness. Here's pics of the old one and the used rpelacement. Again, I lucked out got a full 1995 SE harness! :claps:




So as of Sunday afternoon, She's stripped down good and cleaned up. Out comes all the old oil, and I have flushed her with two new quarts of oil. I put a small STP filter on to do the first 1000 miles just to clear out all the cobwebs, with a larger Bosch filter waiting for the first real oil change to Rotella Synthetic.

Hey, anther nice surprise. The bike has a K&N Filter. Coolio.

Final task for the day: clean and flush the carbs. Manually pumped out all the old gas, and filled the pots with cleaner, letting them drain out the pot screws

Note: GL1500 pot screws will require a 16" + straight screw driver to reach from the front radiators. Be careful not to screw them completely out!


Time in so far: 41 hours

Parts:

Cleaning supplies 20.00
Screw/bolt set 18.00
Oil/Filters 30.00
Jack 99.00
Windshield grommets 15.00
Multi-Gauge 15.00
Carb Cleaner 9.00
Oil drain plug 5.00

226.00


Cost-to-date:

WEEKEND1 1393.00
WEEKEND2 226.00

TOTAL 1619.00


NEXT: WEEKEND 3 - NEW WIRING HARNESS and electrical
 

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Senior Smart Aleck
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1,599 Posts
nicely done :claps::claps::claps:

Enjoying following this project.

When u get done can I bring mine out for a deep clean :raspberry::raspberry::waving::ROFL::ROFL:
 

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...I used a citrus based cleaner for most of the frame and parts, but for the greasy underbelly, I used a mild version of grill/oven cleaner to foam away the crud. This worked well and did not compromise the metal or plastic...
> Try a heavy coat of Lemon Pledge, and let it sit for a week... at which point the heavy crud will often wipe right off.

...So Far my missing parts list and replacements is pretty short. I go two sets of Japanese metrics from Cycle Gear, and I will hit Ace Hardware for the rest...
> Suggest replacing as many of the hex head bolts you can with Stainless Steel Socket Head Cap Screws (that use an allen wrench)... They are so much easier to install/remove, especially with a ball-end-allen-wrench. Just buy a box of 6, 8 & 10mm SSCS's.

...Remember how I said the brakes were working? Well, the rotors are pretty worn so they'll have to be replaced (You could actually feel the convex curve of the rotor surfaces, front and back. But no leaks, and the pads are worn but solid...
...
> The convex curve does not matter, so long as they meet the minimum thickness... Bike pads are so soft that they will quickly wear to conform to the curve/lip. It's a judgement call, however they are not as critical as on a car (which has harder pads).
> It would be a good opportunity to install some stainless steel brake lines, while you've got it all opened up.
 

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162 Posts
Looks like a great project, I think I'm a little jealous. Nice looking bike, but I'm not really digging that red plastic around the console.
 

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(Rick Sheeley GWRRA)
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659 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Alex!

Some great suggestions. I'll be sure and use them.

At it's age, I think another set of rotors is a safe for the next 100K. And the new rotors are so much lighter than the originals.

I especially agree with your bolt suggestion. Will be replacing as I go.....

KG
 

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Vintage Rider
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2,410 Posts
Best of luck with it. I did a similar project with a 1200 LTD (or what was left of one) a couple of years ago. Rebuilt it from the frame and engine up. Engine was solid. Most of the LTD specific stuff was trashed, and was no longer available. Which is just as well. I put over 200 hours of work and close to $3000 into it, and am still having issues. I even had to replace the rear wheel. It was one of the ones that the bearing/bearing recess was defective from the factory. I have it down to a very basic model now, all the LTD stuff is gone except the fuel injection, which was a nightmare in itself to get working again, because no parts were available. I spent $300 for a nice seat and backrest from eBay, put a new windshield on it, spent another $300 for brand new Progressive 416 rear shocks, $150 for a new regulator, and on and on. And right now it is sitting in front of my house and won't start.
 

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Postpubescent member
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36,382 Posts
The project you've embarked on will be frustrating, laborious, and one of great satisfaction and pride. There's a lot of satisfaction in bringing a neglected machine like that one back to it's glory days. One thing to remember, eBay is your friend.
I've rebuilt some GL1100s in my old shop that were further gone than that. One I stripped down to a bare frame and started back up from there. I'd tend to disagree with using hex headed bolts, it's way to easy for allen bolt heads to strip, they're okay where Honda uses them to hold plastic parts together but in any stressed use whre they need serious torque I always use hex bolts. It makes for a lot easier life later on down the road. Also when rebuilding a bike like that I used a fine wire wheel to clean the threads and heads of all bolts and fasteners. Getting rust and corrosion off fasteners is an imperative for a decent rebuild. When re-reinstalling steel bolts into aluminum threads I always used a little dab of aluminum anti-seize. Prevents steel bolts from galling aluminum threads. I never over bored and rethreaded bolt holes either the best repair is to use a Helicoil so that the repaired fitting can use the same size and thread bolt as the original. Be prepared for a lot of work and a great bike when finished.
 

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Premium Member
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4,608 Posts
When I first read your post, I though,"OOOh that's alot of work!" Then I saw the pics! Dude! That is a cool looking bike! I hope you get it done this winter. Best of luck! She deserves a second chance!:claps: jimsjinx
 

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... I'd tend to disagree with using hex headed bolts, it's way to easy for allen bolt heads to strip, they're okay where Honda uses them to hold plastic parts together but in any stressed use whre they need serious torque I always use hex bolts. It makes for a lot easier life later on down the road...
Sorry if I was unclear, but I'm only advising the (SHCS)Socket Head Cap Screws (eg Allen Heads) for non-torqued applications... of which there are more of these on the GL1500 than anything else... Ton's of body panel bolts for example.

ex: The two hex head bolts on the fan housing are much easier to remove if converted to a SHCS, and using a ball-end-allen-wrench... Turns an otherwise 15-minute job into a 10 second one.
 

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Premium Member
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This is an outstanding job and only 2 weekends into the project. Very good tutorial and pictures. You will have a Great Ride and many miles of enjoyment when finished. :claps: :claps:
 

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Premium Member
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456 Posts
ex: The two hex head bolts on the fan housing are much easier to remove if converted to a SHCS, and using a ball-end-allen-wrench... Turns an otherwise 15-minute job into a 10 second one.[/QUOTE]

Guess I'm not the only one who's cussed at those two rear hex bolts.
 

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Vintage Rider
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2,410 Posts
I've always been partial to Allen bolts for most things, there are places where they shouldn't be used. I have replaced the Phillips head screws on many case covers with Allen bolts. I always replace the carb float bowl screws and top cover screws with Allens. Nothing is more likely to strip out than a Phillips head screw. I do not believe there is any place on a motorcycle for Phillips screws. I even replace the screws in the handlebar switch housings with Allen screws. Most Allen bolts are grade 8 or better. But I agree they are not suitable for high torque applications.
 

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Postpubescent member
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36,382 Posts
I don't like Phillips screws in bikes either. The GL1000s have the front and rear plates attached with Phillips screws. I've spend a lot of time with an impact driver getting those things out. It can make a simple waterpump replacement a real pain in the arse. When I had a set of salvaged GL1100 hex cover screws I replaced the fasteners on the 1000 with them. But I still prefer hex over Allen. Allen are good in their place but if there's any chance they'll gall or stick as in steel Allens in aluminum threads, a hex screw is superior. Hex keys are more likely to strip the bolt heads than a six point socket or wrench will round a hex bolt.
 

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(Rick Sheeley GWRRA)
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659 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks, EX. Again good advise that will be taken.

BTW, very, very nice plane. MY step-father Ed was a mustang and bomber pilot in WW2 and he had several wonderful planes (fairchilds mostly) and I always enjoyed them...

KG
 

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(Rick Sheeley GWRRA)
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659 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Alex,

Either way still good advice. As much as possible (and where appropiate) I'll be replacing hardware with the Cycle Gear bolts and hardened pieces from Ace hardware.
 
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