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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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Hey Guy's As I stated Before I changed Oil Last week Went To Honda 10/40 oil.

Now I starting To hear A Kinda a Rattle/Knock When say i'm Running along 55 Miles an Hour Give it Some More throttle! I Know U can't Fix Over Ineternet! But Could Oil Have Something To do With This? I'm tempted To Take Out this High dollar oil& Put back In Castrol 20/50 It had castrol 10/40 Before! What Do You all think?

Please Help

Thanks:?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
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What Are symptoms Of Rod Or bearing Noise? And Do You Hear it at Throttle Increase?
 

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I highly doubt that your oil has anything to do with your rattle or knock.
It's a tuning issue "spark knock" or a mechanical problem.
The heavier oil only buffers the problem.
 

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There are two distinct types of rod knock. The gudgeon pin end or wrist pin
or little end bearing makes a light metallic clack. Often
you can hear the double clack as the con rod reverses the piston direction.

The main connecting rod bearing or big end makes a loud deeper toned knock
and is very bad news. Engines can run for a surprisingly long time with
little end knock. Big end knock is usually rapidly terminal.

Disconnecting the spark plug wire (and carefully grounding it in the case
of high energy ignition!) and then running the engine will cause almost all
little end knocks to disappear. The main source of little end knock is the
combustion event hammering the piston down onto the bearing taking up the
excess clearance with a clack. If the wrist pin is really loose then
disconnecting the spark plug can change a double clack to a single as the
lightly loaded piston reverses direction.

Disconnecting the spark plug rarely makes big end knock disappear altogether.

The really troublesome thing about conrod problems is if it does let go you
need a new block so the risk of continuing to run the engine is quite high.
Always run an engine at low rpm, 1500 to 3000, if you suspect rod knock of
either type. Not generally known is the fact that inertia loads on the TDC
reversal of the piston on the exhaust to intake stroke is when loads on the
conrod peak due to no downward pressure on the piston face and high speed
loading of the bearings.

The noise a conrod makes can be similar to detonation (the cause of the
sound is similar, the cylinder rings with the banging of the piston on the
rod bearings in the one case, and with the sound of the detonation wave
hitting the piston face in the other) but a shot conrod should make noise
at idle. Also, changing ignition timing, or increasing octane will cause
pinging to go away, but a worn conrod will continue to knock!
 

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I had a good knock on mine when I got on the throttle hard, and so I up the octain in the fuel and it has helped considerably, this winter I am thinking of removing the heads and see if there is any carbon build up on the top of the piston and vavles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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I Am pretty sure I've Only Heard this in 5th Gear! I'll Check In the Lower Gears Tommorow
 

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cyclewizard wrote:
There are two distinct types of rod knock. The gudgeon pin end or wrist pin
or little end bearing makes a light metallic clack. Often
you can hear the double clack as the con rod reverses the piston direction.

The main connecting rod bearing or big end makes a loud deeper toned knock
and is very bad news. Engines can run for a surprisingly long time with
little end knock. Big end knock is usually rapidly terminal.

Disconnecting the spark plug wire (and carefully grounding it in the case
of high energy ignition!) and then running the engine will cause almost all
little end knocks to disappear. The main source of little end knock is the
combustion event hammering the piston down onto the bearing taking up the
excess clearance with a clack. If the wrist pin is really loose then
disconnecting the spark plug can change a double clack to a single as the
lightly loaded piston reverses direction.

Disconnecting the spark plug rarely makes big end knock disappear altogether.

The really troublesome thing about conrod problems is if it does let go you
need a new block so the risk of continuing to run the engine is quite high.
Always run an engine at low rpm, 1500 to 3000, if you suspect rod knock of
either type. Not generally known is the fact that inertia loads on the TDC
reversal of the piston on the exhaust to intake stroke is when loads on the
conrod peak due to no downward pressure on the piston face and high speed
loading of the bearings.

The noise a conrod makes can be similar to detonation (the cause of the
sound is similar, the cylinder rings with the banging of the piston on the
rod bearings in the one case, and with the sound of the detonation wave
hitting the piston face in the other) but a shot conrod should make noise
at idle. Also, changing ignition timing, or increasing octane will cause
pinging to go away, but a worn conrod will continue to knock!
The original authorposted the above articlein an Alfa Romeo forum. Cyclewizard, does this apply to a Goldwing engine also?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
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Well According To ETG Guru & one Fellow Winger It's Not Rod Or Bearing! Whew! Just How 1200's Sound. Now I have Had One Member Suggest Going Back to castrol 10/40, What does anybody else Think? Seems these Noises Started When I changed Oil & put Honda 10/40 In it. Would like ya'll 's Opinion if You have the time.

Thanks james
 

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Hi

Well if you only changed the oil and noticed it after that, then Id change it to castrol 10-40 and take it from there. Ive never used and special oils in my 1200's and have never had a problem. But oil always gets a few comments on here! its half the fun:0]
 

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Flatwing, if you look at my avatar you'll find you can fix things over the internet.,,,
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
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That's What I Needed For Changing to Honda Oil! Should have Knew If ain't Broke Don't Fix it!! Thanks Big Cahuna:D
 

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1987 GL1200 Interstate
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Rod knock can be heard in any gear at around 4k rpm. At 55 mph in overdrive you are only getting 2700~2800 rpm and I suspect your bike is just complaing about such abuse. They don't like to be lugged and continuing the abuse will damage a rod.

Honda owners manual says not to use castor based oil. (Castrol)
 

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88 1500 goldwing 116,700 miles. I put all but 7,000 on it. Just started a knock/Rattle noise every once in awhile, & lasting just seconds. Now is most of time, so not riding. Always changed oil & filter. Never a problem. Still runs good, no loss of power, pick up, etc. Is there a video, step by step instructions on changing the gudgeon pin,wrist pin, & bearing? Will try disconnecting the spark plug wire, grounding & start the engine, to see if a difference. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Just really down n out, know my wing is in a bad way. Thanks, Gary
 

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Gary, you would be better off starting a new topic. This old topic was on a 1200 and it may not get the views you need.
 

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To OP. What is the temperature where you live? I recommend using 20w50 oil at all times when the owners manual says it is safe to do so. It has higher film strength and higher load bearing ability than thinner oil. As someone else said, it actually quiet a worn engine, and cut down on oil burning, because it fills in the larger clearances.

Also, as has already been said, riding a gear or two to high will cause a loud rattling sound. That sound is spark knock, or pre-ignition. Keep the rpms in the powerband, if you hear that sound, downshift. Lugging an engine will destroy it 10 times faster than over revving it. It usually causes big end and crankshaft bearing failure first, because the bearings are made out of very soft material, and lugging the engine literally pounds them to pieces.
 

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JerryH
This post is old, 2009. The OP's last post was in 2010. Watch the dates. You may not hear back from the OP.
 
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