Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

I have a new rear disc ordered as the old one is showing signs of wear. I started hearing a dragging sound near the end each stop I make. Looks to be a brake pad
has frozen on one side of the caliper. the pads do not appear to be too, thin but will be replacing those too.

Just wanted to ask if its possible to go thru the same steps as removing the wheel, but simply leave the wheel without the axle on the bike and remove the disc then replace it with the new one?

Searching thru the threads about removing the back tire, it appears there are those that have problems getting the tire off the bike without the bike being on a cycle stand
and those that seem to have no problems getting it out with the bike being on its centerstand. :baffled: Would like to keep this simple and it seems just taking the leftside saddlebag off along with the associated hardware is the simplest way. I do have trailer
hitch and know its going to have to drop off.
Thanks
David
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,848 Posts
imported post

I have no idea as to your question but I do have a comment. If you are going to spend that kind of money and you know you have a problem then you need to do a rebuild of the caliper. If one side pad is frozen to the disc then odds are very high that you have a caliper problem and what you are fixing will just happen again with new parts.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
imported post

The caliper drops off the bike easier than running the tire and wheel out from the bike. Based on ALL the pics and information posted here. It is kind of confusing as to whether the tire is easy to get out or not. Some say its a snap other do not. The caliper basically has to be removed before you get the tire out anyway and hung to the side. There are two pins the pads ride on to float around the disc. Its my understanding the pads can hangup on the pins. If I can remove the disc without taking the wheel completely out from under the bike than I will do that. The caliper for me is a non-issue and will address it
one I have it uncovered.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,437 Posts
imported post

The caliper drops off the bike easier than running the tire and wheel out from the bike.
l
I have a new rear disc ordered as the old one is showing signs of wear.
You will need to remove the left saddle bag and swing your left muffler down at a minimum. I use a crescent or open box wrench on the right axle nut so that I do not have to move the right muffler.

If you do not have a hitch, it is easier to removed the middle license cover and middle brace to slide the rim out. Outherwise, cocking the wheel in and out will be a pain unless you can get the bike a little higher.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
imported post

Thanks Foosman
You just put in your statement of removing the middle brace that no one mentioned in any of the threads that I read.
Since I can remove the brace then that explains why several have said it was pretty easy.
 

·
Pwhoever
Joined
·
3,161 Posts
imported post

I am not sure what tire you have but with my Metzler 880 (I've been lucky so far with Metz, 2nd set) I have to let the air out of the rear tire and it makes it easier to maneuver the wheel out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
163 Posts
imported post

i have just replaced the rear tyre on my 1200, i had to raise the bike, take off the left saddle box and release the rear shocks, than i used my trucks jack to raise the swing arm above the exhaust so that the axel would slide out. im guessing its not too far away from the 1500 but i could be wrong. you could theoretically remove the disc and not the wheel but once you have removed everything for the disc it would take you seconds to pop the wheel off the final drive. again i am talking in terms of 1200 but again i am guessing its not too far off the 1500. good luck!

Ali
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top