Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

21 - 37 of 37 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
Peter I have ridden the Dragon many times very fast, never had a hint of brake failure. You want to ride like that, you MUST service your ride. Change the brake fluid on a regular basis. (not every 4 years)
I rode the Dragon three times before this occasion without any problems. Fast too but not two up with 40-50 lb additional stuff
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
I rode the Dragon once, realized right off that it was at best, a hyped up dangerous roadway open to the general public frequented all too often by dangerous riders wanting to play "Randy Racer" & too often in over their heads.
You must have been really scared. Please dont do it again. Scared people create the problem, just as a beginner skier doesnt belong on diamond slopes.
He IS the problem.
I rode many great rides in my career. Back of the Dragon is nearly on the top of the chart. Unless you get a slow poke in front of you to ruin it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,613 Posts
Next time I go to the Dragon ill put the bike in the first gear all the way down so all of you can say WHATABOY:laugh:
Sounds like a plan to me. lol.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,351 Posts
Next time I go to the Dragon ill put the bike in the first gear all the way down so all of you can say WHATABOY:laugh:
Might be a good idea until you polish up on braking technique? BTW, it's "ATTABOY" (as in "it only takes one AWESHUCKS to erase a whole slew of ATTABOYs") in these parts …
… so it would never occur to me to say "WHATABOY".
You must have been really scared.
Not scared a bit of a road, but saw / see no need to unnecessarily risk my co-rider on that road with those fools (the likes of which took pride in hanging their leftovers of mishaps in the tree) who treat it like a closed course.


Later maybe ….. :smile2:
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,594 Posts
I use both sets most of the time, but they linked. I think the back with one in the front

In those 4 years I put about20-30 K on the bike. Im no expert but I dont think the brake fluid should be changed very often. Heck I put 200K a on a car and never change it. (relax, its not your car, for the ones that are ready to jump on my head)
Come to think of it the fluid change was done by the dealer upon the brake recall.
However Its time for all fluids change, minus antifreeze.
I change that every 250K :ROFL:
Yes , your brakes are linked . On the 1800 the pedal operates all 3 calipers AND the hand lever operates all 3 calipers , BUT hydralik it is two seperate systems (there is 3 pistons in each caliper , some operated by the pedal and some by the hand lever ).
I see you mention the brake recall , but there is actually two recalls (first one not neccesary if the second one is done ). The problem that led to those recalls was overheating rear brakes .
The recomended interval for changing brake fluid ( and clutch fluid ) is two years , - even when the bike wasnt used in those two years .
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
BTW, it's "ATTABOY" (as in "it only takes one AWESHUCKS to erase a whole slew of ATTABOYs") in these parts …
… so it would never occur to me to say "WHATABOY".


Later maybe ….. :smile2:
Sorry, sometime I screw up . English is not my native language.
What's a mesquito anyway ?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
I went back and looked at the beginning of Trip to Far away. All liquids were changed in 2016. (I left the maintenance log book in NJ)

I understand the recommendation and Im sure a few change their fluids every two years or closer interval.

But really what does the average rider do. ?
Sooo when did YOU -the everyday motorcyclist, last change your brake fluids?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
24,358 Posts
But really what does the average rider do. ?
Sooo when did YOU -the everyday motorcyclist, last change your brake fluids?
I try to do it every year & I'm not hard on brakes. Most of the time just a short tap going into a corner if needed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
Yesterday I took a look at the brake pads .
Last they were changed at the same time. The rear one is halfway thru while the front ones , which take 80% of the brunt is just a bit used.
As I said above I use the brakes in conjunction with each other. And as Smeden says they're linked.
Maybe just maybe my overheating problem mentioned by Smeden, for which Honda had a recall wasn't totally fixed/ ( I took the bike in there for the second recall)
And Im very light light on all my vehicles, Dave. Slow accelerating and slow decelerating. I often used to argue with my wife about her having the foot on the gas pedal even thou it was a red light far ahead. I normally coast to it unless I have someone tailgating me.
I hate sudden accelerations too. I think it takes a tall on the vehicle.

Then again I went down Mt Evans and I think Sierra Mt ( severely slopped road) with no problems after the recall.
Im going to change the pads and fluid and take it from there
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,612 Posts
Yesterday I took a look at the brake pads .
Last they were changed at the same time. The rear one is halfway thru while the front ones , which take 80% of the brunt is just a bit used.
As I said above I use the brakes in conjunction with each other. And as Smeden says they're linked.
Maybe just maybe my overheating problem mentioned by Smeden, for which Honda had a recall wasn't totally fixed/ ( I took the bike in there for the second recall)
And Im very light light on all my vehicles, Dave. Slow accelerating and slow decelerating. I often used to argue with my wife about her having the foot on the gas pedal even thou it was a red light far ahead. I normally coast to it unless I have someone tailgating me.
I hate sudden accelerations too. I think it takes a tall on the vehicle.

Then again I went down Mt Evans and I think Sierra Mt ( severely slopped road) with no problems after the recall.
Im going to change the pads and fluid and take it from there
Peter,
You might have an issue as the thickness of the rear pad is 50% thicker than the fronts when new. The fronts are about 4mm new while the rears are 6mm new. Might be worth looking in to. Rear brake might have a piston, hydraulic or mounting issue????
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,351 Posts
What's a mesquito anyway ?
It's a blood sucking disease spreading pest with wings, it's closer to a mosquito than thou is to though or thru is to through or tall is to toll, etc, but you knew that.
Yesterday I took a look at the brake pads .
Last they were changed at the same time. The rear one is halfway thru while the front ones , which take 80% of the brunt is just a bit used.
As I said above I use the brakes in conjunction with each other. And as Smeden says they're linked.
Maybe just maybe my overheating problem mentioned by Smeden, for which Honda had a recall wasn't totally fixed/ ( I took the bike in there for the second recall)
And Im very light light on all my vehicles, Dave. Slow accelerating and slow decelerating. I often used to argue with my wife about her having the foot on the gas pedal even thou it was a red light far ahead. I normally coast to it unless I have someone tailgating me.
I hate sudden accelerations too. I think it takes a tall on the vehicle.

Then again I went down Mt Evans and I think Sierra Mt ( severely slopped road) with no problems after the recall.
Im going to change the pads and fluid and take it from there
Reads like the rear brakes have been taking most all of the brunt, whether intended or not. Hustling a 800+ pound MC loaded with rider & co-rider & a lot of gear through Deal's Gap apparently just overwhelmed the rear brake. Maybe the rear brake just never did fully release due to one or more of several possible faults.
I still am of the opinion that in your case, new brake fluid likely would not have helped, but neither would it have hurt.


Take care Y'all (as in "You All" or "All Youse") …:smile2:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
130 Posts
I try to alternate front to rear braking so that each one has a little cool down period every 1000 feet or so. Doing this while using engine braking seems to work pretty well for me. I know that some of you will bring it up that the brakes are linked, and therefore the brakes are not actually alternating, but even though they are linked, there is more pressure going to the rear when the rear pedal is used, and vice-versa.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3 Posts
Late post, but I've been there. Not with the brakes issue, but enjoying the twists and turns. Gears are my natural brakes in these situations.Usually the front brakes are used as well As I understand it, the front brakes are worn much faster than than back. I also understand the speed limits. Yes, I could be pulled over and reminded. If traffic is heavy, I do not "push the envelope" as I may endanger others. If alone, I may be more aggressive. I retain a safe ride, but I am not a snail. I guess I'm saying enjoy the ride but remember your and others safety. You have to live with your actions. Prayers that you enjoy a long and enjoyable ride.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
294 Posts
Interesting topic, but I rode The Dragon early in September so I'll give myself permission to chime in. I had been fortunate to have done a considerable amount of working on trail braking (with the front brake only) as well "delayed apex" on curves. I did not use my rear brake once on the dragon and because of the delayed apex I didn't get in a bind by running out of lane and having to cross the yellow line. Now, unless there is a real reason (wet roads, gravel, etc) that I should not use my front brakes, I NEVER use the rear brake.

Also, I only hope I have ridden half the miles that DBohrer has before I have to give up riding!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3 Posts
Might as well add my two cents worth.

Brake fluid absorbs water. It starts out clear, but the more moisture is absorbs, the yellower it gets.
So when you your brake fluid looks like piss, you really need to change it. Not just so that the water doesn't vaporize when the brakes get hot, but because the moisture corrodes (rust) the inside of the brake lines.
I try to change my brake fluid when it begins to have any visible color. It's not so hard with a one way valve like cyclegear.com motion-pro-hydraulic-brake-bleeder.

In addition, the brake calipers need to be able to float on the mounting pins so that they do not hold the pads against the disk when you are not using them. There are a lot of good articles about what to use to lubricate the pins so they don't hang up.

I have also had a rear brake master cylinder fail, just because they do sometimes. Had to order a kit and change the gaskets. But I have never heard of a master cylinder recovering after sitting once they fail.

The last thing I will say is that riding my gold wing two up with a luggage (or a trailer), is more like driving a semi with a maximum load. You simply cannot expect your brakes to not overheat on a hard stop, especially a hill.
 
21 - 37 of 37 Posts
Top