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My '81 GL1100 has been sitting in the driveway for several weeks. Last night i jumped on it and took off down the road. When I came to my first stop, i went for the rear brake, and the pedal wouldn't give at all. I started to use the front brake, but realized I was already slowing because the rear brake was stuck engaged. I was able to manually pull the rear brake pedal back up with my foot, and the brake released, allowing me to ride back to the driveway relying mostly on the front brake.

Back at the house me and a friend took a look at it. The brake fluid was low, but not empty, so I don't think that's the problem. There's a spring wrapped around the brake pedal where it attaches to the frame, we thought maybe that was bound up from sitting in the weather, tried a little bit of WD-40, to no avail. Last item of mention: when the brake pedal is depressed, it pushes a hydraulic piston close to the frame. The rubber boot around that piston is worn out, and some corrosion has taken place.

I'm pretty much a mechanical noob, but I've peformed all of the maintenance and repairs on this thing so far, so I'm a quick learner. Any help would be appreciated, but you have to use kindergarten words starting out. :D

Thanks so much.
 

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On the outside of that big spring you should see a large washer and cotter pin. Disconnect the small pin that hooks the pedal to the Master Cylinder then pull that large cotter key and remove the washer then the pedal. Inside there you will find a horrible mess of corrosion. Clean that up and grease it good then re-assemble.
 

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Mine was stuck too after sitting in a field for ~6 years. One day something finally gave way and it's worked fine ever since.
 

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Either one will be fine. You are just trying to provide a touch of lube and keep some water out to reduce future rust.
 

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Wheel bearing grease will stand up to moisture longer. One of my bikes has a grease nipple fitting installed by the PO.
 

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My project bike had the same problem and I let penetrating oil do the work for me. I would spray it, work it, let it sit, spray it, work it, , , , took about 2 days to work the rust out now it is free and easy and I never lifted a wrench :action:
 

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Those pedals do collect corrosion in the pivot. I've had two 1100s that did that, one was very stiff and one was frozen solid. That one took a lot of work to get it off the stud. If you free one up just by lubing it with penetrating oil or motor oil you're only postponing the inevitable, it has to be removed, cleaned up and relubed. I use boat trailer wheel bearing grease on that part, the stuff is designed to be more resistant to being washed out by water than general purpose lithium grease.
 

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While your at it you might as well pull the slider bolt on the rear caliper too. Clean it up and put alittle of that white moly on it. That slider bolt will get gummed up and cause rear brake drag too.
Later Rumple
 

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I had a 1983 that sat since 1999 (8 years). I bought stuff at the auto parts store called "Blaster". It has some kerosine in it I think and really gets in the spaces. This pedal was frozen. Three days of "blaster" and working the pedal up and down did the trick. Fixed another the same way.

Yes, disassembly with lithium grease is best. Maybe I'm lazy but I figured only taking things apart as a last resort.
 

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Sounds like you're describing 'PB Blaster' it will help free a stuck pedal as well as other penetrating oils but for long term the only way is to take the pedal off and clean out the rust that's hanging it up. It's important that the pedal operate freely to prevent dragging brakes.
 

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I've used PB Blaster on all sorts of things.
A couple of head bolts on a 47 Chevy pickup (plus torch)
A frozen Harley rear wheel and drum brake
and the rear brake drums on my 64 Chevy!

I love that carp!
 
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