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Greetings and salutations fellow wingers,

I finally was able to restrain myself from riding my newly aquired 82 interstate and pull the rear wheel for tire replacement. (putting on one of the new Dunlop Elite IIIs)

While I was there, I decided to go ahead and remove the rear bags, trunk, rack, and crash bars; which evidently were put to use before I bought the bike and are in need of some major tweaking with a dead-blow hammer. Thus having a clear view of the rear wheel, I was able to remove it rather easily. I also got a good look at the rear brake and things are not looking good there.

The caliper piston seems to be unable to recess all the way back into the caliper. The rear brake works tolerably with just this short draw and half-worn pads, but I would like to go ahead and put new pads on. Has anyone else run into this problem of the rear brake piston stopping at the halfway-in point, or should I just start looking for a new rear caliper set?
 

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Caliper rebuild kits are available. Sounds like you have the customary amount of build-up behind the piston. Various web sites offer the parts.---Bike Bandit etc-etc, I went low-ball and purchased from J.C.Whitney,(three years ago). They're still working fine... :gunhead:
 

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I agree. I found the same to be true when I got my 83 1100. The brake fluid was basically caramel, and there was a lot of sedimentary buildup behind the pistons. I bought my seals and dust seals, as well as the piston slider boots from Honda. The rebuild was pretty easy, and probably took 30 minutes or so, and only took that long because I made darn sure to clean them well.

You may find that a pair of external hog-ring pliers may come in handy. They have jaws that expand when you press the handles, and they effectively let me grab the piston from inside its recess. That way I didn't have to worry about marring the outside of the piston with standard pliers.

Jack
 

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Thanks, Jack! I will definietly use your tip on the pliers.

Hope to see you out there on Hwy 40 sometime.
 

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Morn'n All: Be sure and clean all the way from the reservoir to the caliper.

I just did my '81 and it had stuff all through it. I also put stainless line on and braking improved a bunch. Less spongy. I also put on new tire (Elite -2's)

I would like to know how your 3's work for ya.

Cary

 

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An effective way to remove the piston is to let the fluid due the work. I had my son work the brake pedal to eject the piston, while I held the piston wrapped in shop towels to catch any mess. Beats marring the piston with pliers. Since nothing in the hydraulics compresses, there is no big spurt when the piston finally works free, but have a container to dump the cylinder full of brake fluid into when done. Also make sure you keep the reservior full while doing this. Don't want air in the line.
 

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A shot of compressed air also gets them out but put a rag in the caliper to catch them. The usual reason the pistons don't want to go all the way in is a build up of crud on the outside of the exposed piston. Clean everything up, put in new seals and dust seals. Wet everything, inside of caliper cylinders, pistons and rubber parts with brake fluid before reassembling. Flush plenty of fresh fluid through the system before re-connecting the brake line, and wipe out any gunk in the master cylinder.
 

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Thanks for all the help! I got my caliper all cleaned out and then went to pump them back up to pressure and my master cylinder went kaput... now I am on to taking out the master cylinder.

Thanks again for all the help, I will open up another thread if I run into trouble working on the master cylinder.

This bike reminds me of an old MGB I used to have.... if you fix something in one place, it puts just enough strain on something else to break it.... with everything kept half-repaired, it ran like a dream... Zen and the art of shade-tree mechanicing!
 

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SoulvilleUSA wrote:
This bike reminds me of an old MGB I used to have.... if you fix something in one place, it puts just enough strain on something else to break it.... with everything kept half-repaired, it ran like a dream... Zen and the art of shade-tree mechanicing!
MGB! I had a 1957 MGA that almost made me disown the family name since it came from England too.

:whip:Lucas Electric:whip: :whip:SU side draft carbs:whip:
 

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If you've got a pair of plumber's pliers with the nylon jaws, you can grab on to the pistons and gently twist and pull the pistons out also. Just be careful not to warp the piston.

Hobie
 

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I highly recomend coating the brake piston with silicone grease prior to reassembly.

The silicone grease reduces stiction and allows the piston to back off ever so slightly after brake activation, eliminatingsqueeling brakes. It also keeps water from contacting the thin layer of brake fluid on the brakepiston and gumming up.

I had to do this on my GL1100 Interstate because the rear brake was overheating until it locked up.

===Don===
 

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Don't know, if the silicone grease is soluble in brake fluid which is a pretty good solvent. The book recommends soaking the rubber parts in DOT4 or whatever your bike needs and wiping the cylinder and piston with brake fluid. I prefer to have a clean dry exterior surface on the piston so that it doesn't collect dirt and drag it back into the seals.
 

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Though coating the brake pistons and sealswith silicone grease is not mentioned in my GL1500 Honda Service Manual, it is mentioned twice in the GL1100 Honda Service Manual, pages 13-12 and 13-14.
 

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In that case I'd agree with the idea. But I still don't like the idea of any grease on the outside of the exposed part of the pistons, it's gonna collect dirt and crud.
 

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Okay Exavid and DonM, you two are starting to sound like two arguing old women :).

I do appreciate all the assistance though.
 
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