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OK I have decided to try replacing the brake pads on my own instead of the Honda shop. I have never done brakes before & have a couple of questions. I took the caliper off & noticed that one side of the pads was wore alot thinner than the other one. The outside pad is really thin & the inside pad is still thick. Could this be because the caliper is stuck or is this normal wear. Also it looks like that there is just enough room between the pads to fit over the rotor, If I put on new pads will there be enough gap between the pads to fit it back over the rotor? If the pistons are stuck is it a hard job to fix them? This is on a 1982 GL1100I.

Thanks
 

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Indeed the uneven wear is indicative of a stuck caliper. Take a careful look at the sleeve in the lower mounting bolt, the one with the rubber covers on each end. You can remove the rubber covers by carefully tapping the sleeve with a punch or screwdriver on the end of the sleeve until it's a little more than 1/8" inside the caliper. Once the end of the sleeve is inside the caliper far enough you can remove the rubber from the groove in the caliper bore. Tap the sleeve the opposite way until it comes out of the caliper and you can remove the other rubber cover. Don't try to pull the cover while the end of the sleeve still covers it because it will tear the rubber. The sleeve must be aloose slide fit, this is the usual cause of a sticking caliper. Make sure the caliper is a sliding fit on the top pin too. You should pull the pistons out of the caliper either by using the brake pedal to push it out or a shot of compressed air will get them out. Put a rag in the caliper to protect and catch the pistons. You can pull them out with a plier, pad the piston rim and pull them out with a twisting motion, be careful you don't want to scar the piston or distort the edge. Clean everything up and replace the piston seals and dust cover rubbers. With the pistons pushed all the way back in they will fit over the rotor just fine. Make sure you wipe everything down with brake fluid (the appropriate type for your model) prior to reassembly, including the cylinders, piston and the four rubber parts. Don't try to get away with just pushing the pistons back in and replacing the pads, it's likely you will end up with stuck pistons due to the dirt on the outside of the pistons jamming in the cylinder. It's an easy job.
 

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Wow, someone up as late as I am. One more question. Can all of this be done on the bike or do I need to remove the caliper from the brake line? Also should I have the rotor turned down , replace or just leave it the way that it is? Sorry for all the questions but I really do appreciate all the help. Now to try & find the courage to start this project!! Thanks again.
 

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To do it right and avoid strain on the brake line, it's best to take the caliper off the bike. If the rotor isn't scored badly and it will mike out to the minimum thickness use it. I don't know the specs on the 1100 rotor but surely some of the others here on the forum will chime in with the minimum measurement. If the rotor has to go you will have to pull the rear wheel to remove it. I'd sure recommend a copy of Clymers manual for your bike to help with this and future jobs.
 

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According to my service manual the disc thickness limit on the 80-Standard and Interstateis 4.0 (0.16) and on the 82-Aspencade 9.0 (0.35).

Hope this helps!

Bob:11grey:
 
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