Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

I had replaced a rusting acorn nut that holds the upper right rear shock to the frame. What I discovered was that the thread on the stud had been stripped in the middle and the nut was only hanging on by a few threads on the end.

I looked on the inside of the frame and it appears to be threaded through a female coupler that is welded to the frame. I didn't want to remove the shock to examine the otherside out of fear that I could damage the few threads that I have left.

Is this indeed the case? Is the stud replaceable? I didn't see a separate part number at Goldwinginfo.com, but I can get hardened metric threaded rods or bolts. It would make sense for it to be a serviceable item since it could be damaged in an accident or while being serviced.

Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,938 Posts
imported post

Probably could buy a tap set and Tap new threads in it, if I,m reading your post right?:baffled:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,191 Posts
imported post

 ............  the answer , from a Mechanics point of View is quite simple...install ,and torque it up... If you can tap it to a newer thread same size,or one  smaller size .. whichever it needs, and the new threads look clean,and bright, and not stripped,and it holds the torque required.. then you are ok.. If it does not,,, then you MUST re place it.. which sounds like drilling out the old welded on nut, and going to next larger size bolt...which might mean drilling out the top of the shock just a bit.... Personally ,I have never liked Acorn cap nuts...  a good washer ,and nut combo torques up cleaner ,and is stronger...  I would try to make the new stud a touch longer,and add an acorn , for pretty ,on the top of  a regular nut.. and parts that move should always have a collet to prevent a stripping situation...... but this is a tricky area of mechanical strength, and  the top of a shock is not a place to learn about materials... Many mechanics do re-tap a stripped bolt  and bring it back to life, and to proper torque, 'cause they know what they are doing ...... Enlist the aid of a mechanic friend.. or a really good fabrication shop.. for starters they will have the correct taps... SilverDave /forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

·
Other side of the pond
Joined
·
3,409 Posts
imported post

The stud is welded in place. As it's an important item I'd leave it alone once the nut tightens up properly.If itreally needs replacing you will have to cut the old one off and drill out the stump, then wled a new one in place.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
imported post

Thanks everyone that was what I was afraid of. I might try chasing the threads with a die to try and clean them up.
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

That's the main test, if it will hold recommended torque go with it, if not it needs to be cut off, drilled out and replaced. You really don't want the rear end to collapse.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
991 Posts
imported post

Good advice, if the thread will hold the nut then leave it alone. I mean how often will you need to be removing the shock anyway? :waving:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
imported post

I own an 1981 GL1100I with 22000 original miles on it and the first thing I broke on it while getting it back road worthy was break the shock mounting stud on the right hand side. As I got futher into doing my rebuild I kept looking at ways to fix the stud, dealer said to remove and weld shock mount back on[can not get those shock mounts anywhere,so do not do that]

Iwas able to take a veener caliperinside the frame and probe inside the shock mount to find out it was hollowwith a nice dimple in the end next to the stud.I cut the stud off with a hacksawleaveing the shock mount on the frame. Started inside the frame with an angle drill with a 1/4 in drill bit .After drilling a pilot hole with the 1/4 drill bit all the way through the stud I drilled from the outside in with a 3/8 inch drill bit. Then installed a 3/8 "x4 " grade 8 bolt.

I was able to use an acorn nut that I bought with the bolt and you can't even tell it is not factory.

By the way,my repair is stronger than the original seeing as how the bolt goes all the way through the frame ,shock mount and allows me to more securely mount the saddle bag frames.:weightlifter:

Keep it vertical.Fred
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

:waving::waving:Welcome to the Best Goldwing Site on the Internet Litfuse!:waving::waving:

Sounds like a good repair method that others here might need to consider.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
419 Posts
imported post

Excellent tip Fred. Just to add that you should use a high tensile bolt for this. Mild steel is too soft for suspension use.
 

·
The Irish Crew
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
imported post

DJ wrote:
Excellent tip Fred. Just to add that you should use a high tensile bolt for this. Mild steel is too soft for suspension use.
Great stuff DJ& Fred. It's worth remembering all this.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top