Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

I have my 82 1100S I've been rebuilding. I was wondering about the oil in the rear shocks. Should I replace it? I did blow out all the air lines and reconnect everything. Aired them up to 56 PSI and when I checked them a day and a half later, they still had 56 in them. And if I do change the oil in them, can I just pour it out the air hole and then refill it from there also? And, if I don't need to change it, is there a way to check to see if there is enough oil in them? Thanks, Ray....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
46 Posts
imported post

Hmmm, I would let it roll. The main problem with oil is thermal breakdown and shocks stay pretty cool. If The oil level is low, a general rule of thumb would be that only hard rebounds would be uncontrolled. In other words, Air does most of the light duty rebounding and oil is for the hard stuff. For example if an airplane was to bounce hard on landings but feel fine while on the ramp, the most probable cause is low oil. Furthermore, oil is not being compressed in a shock but re-directed through an orifice. The only time I would change oil is when suspicion of contamination.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
imported post

I think I may have lost a small amount of oil when blowing out the lines because I tried doing it with only one disconnected. That forced air into the other and caused it to blow out oil but not much. The oil looked red in color and now I don't know how much is in it. Any way to check it?
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top