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I purchased my 2010 audio comfort GL 1800on Oct1, 2010. Since then I have put 40k+ on it and enjoyed every mile. I was told by aGW chapter member how to check the rear suspension, and found that the shock did not engage till about 6 or 7 on the read out. I had the bike checked out at the Honda dealer I purchased it at check it out and was told by them it is fine. Honda says the first six will not show a response in lifting the bike physically, it is mostly preloading the main spring on the rear shock.

Is this correct or does anyone know for sure?
 

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That's BS there is an issue with the rear shocks on 1800. That Honda will not address..they were changing them out as warranty..but it was too expensive so they changed the specs..if they are not leaking they are good..all BS.

What is happening is that the lines on the system are expanding and taking the first few cc's of fluid movement as the plugger is engaged, so nothing happens to the shocks. And it's going to get worse as the lines keep expanding as they get older.

The only permanent solution is to replace the lines with braided lines which are available, I'd have to research the company name.

There a guy here in Scottsdale who does it..either on the bike or you remove the shock system and he supplies a replacement. The system is not supposed to be rebuildable but it can be done.

Honda refuses to acknowledge the problem and so won't fix it. It's been pointed out to them a few years ago but they will not address the issue. Really a simple fix at the manufacturing stage not so once on the road.

This was discussed several times in the GWRRA magazine over the last two years or so.
 

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Thank you for the second, the chapter member that informed of the problem also knows the mechanics and will help me fix the problem. I just wanted to beleive that HONDA would step up to the plate and rectify the problem on my bike. Shows how dumb I am. But I will spend the money to do it myself and then watch to see if this voids my warranty, lol.
 

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A lot of 1800 riders go to the Racetech rear shock and front end valve and springs for a better ride control
 

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The rear shock actuator can be topped off with oil and the problem is solved. There is a tutorial somewhere if I can find it.
 

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I thought it was a sealed system..and hard to re-bleed once opened up as there is no regular bleeder valve....unless you know the secret?? which I don't. SO where is this valve that you can add more fluid??? is it on the part fiche on line??? could you ID it's number for me so I can pass it on to our local GL guru??
 

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Traxxion has a wery nice "manual" about this .And they also have the "steel" hose .
But i dont now where to find the manual rigth now , sorry.
Iff your take the shock out off the bike ,(a lot of work) , think about a Traxxion replacement!(a bit expensive but MUCH better ).
 

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The correct way to check the rear shock’s pre-load.
Start with the bike on the center stand, zero the setting by holding the decrease button till the motor stops, with your ear close to the right saddlebag so you can hear the motor, push and hold the increase button till you hear the motor come under load (tone change) then release the button and take a look at what number is showing on the display.
IMHO up to 4 is acceptable, anything above that and I would top up the reservoir.
Before starting make sure the preload is set to zero. Remove the right saddlebag and unplug the two connectors from the unit. Remove the two bolts holding the unit to the frame and pull it down out of the rubber grommet. Remove the banjo bolt holding the pressure line to the unit.(note orientation) (some oil will leak out) Hold the hose up with tape or string. Take the unit to the bench. Remove the three allen bolts and separate the reservoir and remove the piston. Clean all components. Re-install the piston and reservoir but leave the three bolts loose so the reservoir is up about 1/8 inch from tight. Using a small wood or plastic pin, insert through the banjo hole and push the piston all the way down, it will move easily. Fill through the banjo bolt hole with 5W fork oil. Keeping the unit vertical, back to the bike and attach and tighten hose. (Make sure of orientation and crush washers in place) Once the hose is located correctly and tight, now tighten the three allen bolts in steps to pull the reservoir down tight. Reinstall the unit and reconnect both plugs. Check unit for operation before installing saddlebag, it will now preload right from zero.
 

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Cal-D wrote:
The correct way to check the rear shock’s pre-load.
Start with the bike on the center stand, zero the setting by holding the decrease button till the motor stops, with your ear close to the right saddlebag so you can hear the motor, push and hold the increase button till you hear the motor come under load (tone change) then release the button and take a look at what number is showing on the display.
IMHO up to 4 is acceptable, anything above that and I would top up the reservoir.
Before starting make sure the preload is set to zero. Remove the right saddlebag and unplug the two connectors from the unit. Remove the two bolts holding the unit to the frame and pull it down out of the rubber grommet. Remove the banjo bolt holding the pressure line to the unit.(note orientation) (some oil will leak out) Hold the hose up with tape or string. Take the unit to the bench. Remove the three allen bolts and separate the reservoir and remove the piston. Clean all components. Re-install the piston and reservoir but leave the three bolts loose so the reservoir is up about 1/8 inch from tight. Using a small wood or plastic pin, insert through the banjo hole and push the piston all the way down, it will move easily. Fill through the banjo bolt hole with 5W fork oil. Keeping the unit vertical, back to the bike and attach and tighten hose. (Make sure of orientation and crush washers in place) Once the hose is located correctly and tight, now tighten the three allen bolts in steps to pull the reservoir down tight. Reinstall the unit and reconnect both plugs. Check unit for operation before installing saddlebag, it will now preload right from zero.
There ya go RB, I never did find the tutorial I was looking for on the 1800 board but Cal-D was willing to write it out. I can't type that much and hold my concentration. :readit:
 
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