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Hello.

this is the second time i find my battery dry. i gotta be honest. i dont check it very often i think last time i checked it was 3 months ago. i know its a lot. but i dont ride too much. only around town every friday lets say 20-30 km. and sundays around 100-150km rides. the only long trip i had was about 3 weeks ago it was a 1700 km trip. well. i've installed a voltmeter since last time i found the battery dead and i check it the whole time while i ride. it never goes past 14V its wired directly to the battery with a relay. the last time i filled up the battery with a mix of 50% acid 50% distilled water.

i have a new battery but im afraid to install it. i dont think it is normal that the battery goes dry after 3 months right?. it doesn't seem to have cracks or leaks. what should i do?.
 

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If the batter got to the point that the plates were exposed from no water, you can pretty much kiss it off. They are small batteries, if you don't drive it much you need to have it on a trickle charge. It's also not a deep cycle so if you goes down you charge it and goes down again constantly, that will stress the battery as well.

Others here will give you even better info.
 

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I pretty much concur.

I was having the same experience on my bike's battery. The one that came with the bike when I bought it. The bike had sat for about a year in 120+ heat and the water just simply left.

The plates were exposed about 1 inch. I put water in it but it just never had any ooomph, cranking the starter with less than full enthusiasm. also, like yours, even though the volts never got higher than they should, it needed water about every 2 or 3 weeks.

Installed a new battery and it was just fine after that. Cranked right off like it is time to go and "where have I been?" :) Also, it quit using water so fast. Only needed a tiny top off maybe every 4 to 6 weeks, maybe a 1/4 inch down at most.

Put that new battery in and save the old "just in case." I bet you will eventually, like me, toss the old battery because your problems went away.
 

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thanks AZgl1500 i was very scared to install the new battery and get it dry =(

thanks!
 

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AZgl1500 wrote:
Put that new battery in and save the old "just in case." I bet you will eventually, like me, toss the old battery because your problems went away.
John, I sure hope you recycled that there battery :shock:

Ride Safe, Ray

:waving:
 

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You could pay nearly double and get a sealed battery that never needs water added to it. Then just keep the voltage up wit a tender. I love my Dekka battery!
 

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13.8 to 14.2 is ideal so it sounds like your charging system is working OK. You just have to check these little batteries often and top them up with distilled water only. Never add acid.

Q
 

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A wet battery on a bike with higher than normal voltage is going to go thru water faster than we like. Anything above about 14.2 or so, it'll start making water disappear. A lot of the 1200's are running close to 15v. I even had one last year that was running almost 16 (YIKES!!), so I tried 3 other regulators. All were above 14.2 volt, so I settled on the one that was just above that.

I agree with the Dekka.
 

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Temperature, humidity and charging voltage.

The ideal charging voltage for a lead acid battery will vary depending on the ambient air temperature. As the temperature gets lower, the ideal voltage goes higher. On a hot 120 degree day, the optimum voltage is 13.6. At +40 degrees F, the voltage rises to 15.2. At -40 degrees (heaven forbid) it isabout 17 volts.

Most modern vehicles have temperature sensors built into the voltage regulator in the charging system. The regulator will automatically adjust the charging voltage as the temperature changes.

The problem is that older vehiclesas well asmost motorcyclesdon't have these voltage compensating regulators. So the charging voltage is fixed at about 14.2 volts or so which corresponds to about 70 degrees. That works ok for riding in most climates.

Since you live in Mexico which is somewhat warmer than where I live, your charging system is likely overcharging your battery. Overcharging causes the water to "boil off" more quickly.

So the short answer is that you need to add water more often because you live where it is hot. I wish I had that problem!!!
 

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The last battery I had did the same thing, new battery fixed the problem.
 

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When I'd take long trips on the 84 Aspencade or 79 Kawasaki KZ1000 I had to top off the water every day, 2 days and they were dry.
 

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A "trickle charger" is not a good option. It will also cause the battery to go dry by supplying a constant charge. What is needed is a "battery tender". Tenders automatically turn off when the battery is fully charged then on again when needed.
 

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would not a full service charger do just that? The directions in my charger says it does.
 

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"would not a full service charger do just that? The directions in my charger says it does."

Terminology being tossed around is rather poor. There are 3 stages to the charge cycle, as long as your charger has the 3rd one you're good to go. Simplist thing I can say without getting deep into it is check your documentation. It's the float charge you need for long term.
 

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If you can afford it spring for a gel cell battery. No acid or water mess. Have one in my 03 Silverwing and haven't had first bit of problem with it.
 
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