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[align=center]Rebuild the Timing Belt Tensioner - DIY $20 (Preliminary Version)[/align][align=center](and good for all Gold Wings GL1000, GL1100, GL1200, GL1500)
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[align=center]LINK HERE
[/align][align=center]Information developed on or about March 1, 2008 by sandiegobrass

[/align] It is for use by the Gold Wing community. It may be freely copied or distributed if you include the acknowledgement of the origin.

Summary


You can rebuild your timing belt tensioner for less than $20 with quality parts (the same ones used on automobiles).

New OEM tensioners are available for $60 to $80 each. And this is still a reasonable price considering that it is the complete assembly, so I am not necessarily recommending that anyone abandon the OEM solution when it is still available. However, this part is often in short supply and in many cases backordered, so at least those of you that are somewhat handy with tools may be happy to substitute something different that is equally as good, if not better in “fit and function”. This also might be particularly useful on the road for an emergency repair, or the very “budget minded” who would rather spend some time to save a few bucks.

Below there are more possible methods than you probably want to know. I’ve summarized some of the best choices below with a descriptive title. (This will all be edited later.)

· Quick and Dirty 3/8” Hardware Method
· Quick and Dirty 7/16” Hardware Method
· Quick and Dirty 12mm Stud Method
· My “Editor’s” Choice Custom Hex Bolt Method
· Better 12mm Stud Method
· A Good 10mm Stud Method
· Weld Type Options


Background
After I changed my timing belts last winter, I noticed that the tensioners were a bit looser than I thought they should be. I didn’t change them, but ordered a new set. They were backordered and I was told that it would take about 4 weeks to get them. If I had been “out of a ride” for this 4 weeks during good weather, I would have been a bit miffed, so I immediately determined to find a way to rebuild the old ones. To do that in a sound manner would require some research.

It was determined that GL1000 and GL1100 tensioners are identical. Likewise, GL1200 and GL1500 tensioners are identical but different than 1000/1100 tensioners. Ebay yielded a pair of worn out tensioners off a GL1000 and also a single one off a GL1200 for the project experiments. After receiving them, it was immediately evident that the only difference between the two kinds were the backing plates. The bearings and pulleys are identical for all models of Gold Wings (except of course the GL1800 that has no timing belts). This is to say that any of these methods will work equally well on any Gold Wing. The only exception to that statement would be for the GL1000 when you are fitting back the original heat shields that were later dropped from the 1100.

The first option that was considered was to try to rebuild using exact parts. The GORY DETAILS of the OEM tensioner bearings and pulleys are interesting but not relevant. In short, the bearings and pulleys are specially made for Honda (and maybe others, like Porter-Cable) by NTN and could not be obtained directly from the OEM manufacturer (NTN). In my phone discussion with NTN about the NUMBERS on the bearing, it was explained that the bearing used the shields, cages and balls from that bearing but the inner and outer races were specifically manufactured for the OEM application. It was clear that rebuilding using identical parts was not a viable option.

Design Evolution

The next option considered was to try to find appropriate parts to replace the OEM pulleys and shafts. Again, some research into the availability of bearings lead to the LIST OF REPLACEMENT PULLEYS for automotive use. There are many choices, In fact, from this comprehensive set of choices the selection was reduced to THE FEW COLORED choices that were purchased for further inspection. This was further reduced to TWO BEST choices; the T42015 and T42025.

The choice of an appropriate fastener was also by design. By measurement, the hole in the tensioner plate is precisely 14mm. There are a very large number of automobile wheel studs that are 14 mm at the shoulder, so pressed-in automobile wheel studs seemed to be a good option. Subsequently by searching the DORMAN CATALOG, approximately 20 POSSIBLE CHOICES emerged. The DETAILED MEASUREMENTS of each still leaves many suitable choices. In most of the described cases, a single choice of wheel stud will be stated, but there are many options that will work. There were some favorites but no clear winners. Nuts, washers and shims were purchased as well, and the optimization process was begun.

Ultimately, possible choices were assembled for inspection using a test plates with an appropriate thickness (3/16”) and hole (14mm). There were two clear winners in the idler pulley/bearing department. These were the Gates T42025 and T42015. Both are readily available. The T42025 equivalent is also available by about 5 different manufacturers making it a current popular choice (it is used on many 15 year old and older Toyotos). However, the T42015 is a newer design for late model (2001-2009) automobile application (KIA, and Hyundai). The latter is also usually much cheaper and actually a better match to “fit and function” for this application, although some may object to the typical Korean origin of the T42015 bearings compared to the typical Japanese origin of the 4T2025

After assembly and inspection, a number of possibilities developed that depends on the overall skill and objective of the rebuilder. For example, if only hardware store fasteners are to be used, it would be different choices than if automotive fasteners were to be used. Likewise, the availability of specialized tools like a drill press or welder might influence choice. In the end, there are perhaps tens of not hundreds of combination that would work.


[align=center] COMPLETE DOCUMENT HERE


ONE EXAMPLE METHOD
[/align][align=center](See complete document for many other possibilities)
Quick and Dirty 12mm Stud Method
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EDIT: the PDF document is attached here for the sake of Permanence.
 

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Thanks,John.. I've been sitting on this for months.. finally just said to myself.."post it". I know wda-83wing has been after me to get the information out there for some time.. I don't know if many will use it, but it is definitely an option to buying new..

And I notice that it has some errors in it still.. even a couple of the figures will need to be redone, but one should be able to figure it out.. I'll get to it later :)cheeky1:.. ask Wayne what that means...)


SDB/Jim
 

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Thanks Jim for posting this, I will be changing belts this winter and will also do the tensioners. You work hard on this and it shows, I big thank you is not enough buit thanks anyway.
 

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I will leave it here for a few days, to get maximum exposure, then move it to the reference forum as a sticky. Good stuff.
 

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Excellent, useful,referencematerial/info Jim! Well done! :bowing: :bowing:



Ken
 

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Sandy,
Thank you so much, it is nice to know that if I need to I can rebuild the tensioners in the future.

John
 

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Really nice work, SDB. I have a couple of duds on hand, and I will be having a go at it.
 

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Hawker22 wrote:
Really nice work, SDB. I have a couple of duds on hand, and I will be having a go at it.
I am becoming more fond of the 10mm solution. If you can find (or make) the 14mm OD, 10mm ID bushing, then it is one of, if not the best (I amy be changing my "editor's choice").. although any will work.
 

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The document currently does not have the below informations, although it will be updated to include it in the near future.

THE TWO BEARINGS
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The T42025[/b]
[/b]
The T42025 is a close fit (not exact) to the OEM tensioner pulley. In particular the OEM bearing is 60mm outside diameter and the T42025 is 57.5mm. This is quite acceptable (but for those concerned with this, the other choice (T42015) matches the OD exactly).

This bearing is used in early Toyota applications from 1988 through 1997 for the 2.0 and 2.2 liter engines. For the best selection of parts use the 1997 Camry LE 2.2 liter engine lower[/b] timing idler. http://www.RockAuto.com lists the following applications:

TOYOTA CAMRY (1988 - 2001), TOYOTA CAMRY ALL TRAC (1989 - 1991), TOYOTA CAMRY CE 1997, TOYOTA CAMRY DLX (1983 - 1992), TOYOTA CAMRY DLX ALL TRAC (1988 - 1991), TOYOTA CAMRY DX (1993 - 1996), TOYOTA CAMRY LE (1983 - 1997), TOYOTA CAMRY LE ALL TRAC (1988 - 1991), TOYOTA CAMRY XLE (1992 - 1997), TOYOTA CELICA 1999, TOYOTA CELICA ALL TRAC (1988 - 1992), TOYOTA CELICA GT (1986 - 1998), TOYOTA CELICA GTS (1990 - 1992), TOYOTA CELICA GTS ALL TRAC 1993, TOYOTA CELICA GTS SPORT (1986 - 1993), TOYOTA CELICA ST (1987 - 1989), TOYOTA CELICA ST SPORT 1986, TOYOTA MR2 (1991 - 1995), TOYOTA RAV4 (1996 - 2000), TOYOTA RAV4 2-DOOR (1996 - 1997), TOYOTA SOLARA (1999 - 2001)

Likewise there are the following equivalent choices for the lower timing belt pulley: Steel Smooth (57.5mm x 12mm x 29mm):

KOYO Part # 1350363011 $15.24
BECK/ARNLEY Part # 0241006 $19.26
GATES Part # T42025 $27.79
CLOYES Part # 95302 $27.79
SEALED POWER Part # 222111BT $39.79
ACDELCO Part # T42025 (#89049141) $27.99

The T42015[/b]
[/b]
The T42015 is a near exact fit to the OEM tensioner pulley. In particular the OEM bearing is 60mm outside diameter and the T42015 is 60mm.

This bearing is used in late model KIA and Hyundai applications from 1997 through 2008 for the 1.8L (and maybe others) engines. http://www.RockAuto.com lists the following:

HYUNDAI ELANTRA (1996 - 2001), HYUNDAI ELANTRA GL 2008, HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS (1996 - 2008), HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS SPORT 2008, HYUNDAI ELANTRA GT (2002 - 2006), HYUNDAI ELANTRA L 2008, HYUNDAI ELANTRA LIMITED (2006 - 2008), HYUNDAI ELANTRA SE (2007 - 2008), HYUNDAI TIBURON (1997 - 2004), HYUNDAI TIBURON FX (1997 - 1998), HYUNDAI TIBURON GS (2005 - 2007), HYUNDAI TUCSON GL (2005 - 2008), HYUNDAI TUCSON GLS (2007 - 2008), HYUNDAI TUCSON L 2008, HYUNDAI TUCSON LIMITED 2008, KIA SPECTRA EX (2004 - 2008), KIA SPECTRA LX (2004 - 2008), KIA SPECTRA LX CONVENIENCE 2008, KIA SPECTRA LX PREMIUM 2008, KIA SPECTRA SX (2005 - 2008), KIA SPECTRA5 (2005 - 2006, KIA SPECTRA5 LX 2008, KIA SPECTRA5 LX CONVENIENCE 2008, KIA SPECTRA5 SX (2007 - 2008), KIA SPORTAGE LX (2005 - 2008), KIA SPORTAGE LX CONVENIENCE 2008

Likewise there are thefollowing equivalent choices for the timing belt pulley: Steel Smooth (60mm x 10.3mm x 28.5mm):

BECK/ARNLEY Part # 0241282 $16.72
GATES Part # T42015 $17.88
CLOYES Part # 95471 $14.65
NAPA NTP 95471 $23.49
NAPA NBH T42015 $26.49
 

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Greatly revised version uploaded.. if you have a version before the date of this posting, you may want to throw it away and get the new..

The 10mm stud description was also messed up big time.. (too much cut and paste from other methods..) but I think fixed now..

Jim


PM me ifyou find any more errors..

...fortunatelyyou review ofthis preliminary version means that it will likelykeep getting better:waving:

Also be mindful of computer caching issues or you might still have the old version
 

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Current version (Version 20081027) check first line of your document...
 
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