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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone! I posted sometime about a year ago about my project GL1200, and since it's summer again, I'll be trying to fix everything I can, and I know I'll need pointers along the way!

Here's what I've done so far:
-removed all the plastics and cases
-removed the crash guards
-removed the exhaust
-removed the rear suspension (I'll be replacing these with mechanical rather than air)
-removed the rear wheel

My goals for the next couple months are to:
-replace the fuel lines (I'd rather not have fuel lines of unknown age)
-replace the rear suspension
-replace the tires
-change the timing belts
-check the water pump
-rebuild the forks (progressive springs, again to eliminate the need to rebuild the air system)
-start work on rebuilding the brakes

Since I plan on replacing the fuel lines first, I know I'll have to drain the old gas out of the tank and buy a fuel filter.
Are there any fuel line kits specifically for the fuel injection system, or would the lengths be the same as for a carbed 1200?
Also, how would you recommend draining the gas?

Thanks for taking the time to read this!
 

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Junior Grue
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8,153 Posts
They should be high pressure and different to a carbureted system.
Yes.
Fuel tank to pump looks like bulk hose but after the fuel pump it looks like miniature brake lines with banjo fittings. You'll probably have to get these custom made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Alright thanks for the advice! Do you think I would be able to get similar hoses at an autoshop? maybe bringing the fuel lines off the bike would help
 

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You're better off finding something like a granberries or hose power and giving them the old lines and having new ones made up. At least look into it and get some quotes. Any shop that does hydrolic lines or a/c lines "should" be able to make something up.
 

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Vintage Rider
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2,410 Posts
Good luck on that LTD. It is most likely going to be a challenge. While you have it apart, I recommend completely removing and disassembling the fuel injection system, cleaning everything, replacing ALL the rubber hoses and lines on it, Check the 2 reed valves that control the idle for rotting and cracks, and check to make sure the plastic top cover (that the air filter housing sits on) is completely sealed all the way around the edges and that all the screws are there. Most of the issues I had with mine were FI related, pretty much everything was wrong with it. I had to rebuild everything piece by piece. Several parts are no longer available, but can be modified or fabricated. Make sure you have a manual before taking anything apart. All parts for each cylinder must be kept together, and put back where they came from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
JerryH: thanks for the advice. I'll be looking for a manual in the near future then along with places to get the fuel lines made. The fact that I've been able to start it without much trouble even on old fuel makes me hopeful that there's not too much to do, so we'll see (though I thought the fact it didn't idle very well makes me skeptical about the reeds...).

I do hear the FI 1200s have some nice acceleration... I'll keep that as motivation while working on the FI system!
 

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They do have nice acceleration, and once you get the bugs of age worked out you'll probably never look back. I love my fuelie! Running like a top for two years and then some without any injection trouble (I caught reed valves early though), and mine was poorly stored for five years... took less than a week and $200 to get it back on the road (minus tires and fluids of course).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
They do have nice acceleration, and once you get the bugs of age worked out you'll probably never look back. I love my fuelie! Running like a top for two years and then some without any injection trouble (I caught reed valves early though), and mine was poorly stored for five years... took less than a week and $200 to get it back on the road (minus tires and fluids of course).
That's great to hear! Mine will be a little more work since it was crashed so I'll be converting it to a naked wing. Once it is roadworthy again I'll see what I'll do!
This is my first project bike, and though it's not the simplest, I think it'll be very rewarding to complete.
 
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