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Does anyone know if there is a Honda or aftermarket kit for rebuilding calipers? I think I am going to do this as I found my front brake sticking, which is contributing to my (improving but) still poor gas mileage (something like 23mpg for city riding)I also plan on replacing the pads with fresh EBC models.Thanks(and this really is the BGWWSOTI /forums/images/emoticons/tongue.gif)
 

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 does anyone have a Honda part # or should I just go with the aftermarkets?
 

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If the calipers are not leaking, then maybe you can do without the seals.

If you pump out the pistons you can clean them up with some fine emery paper, pay attention also to the caliper in front of the rubber seal and clean this area up, lube them up with a little brake fluid or some silicon grease if you prefer and refit. They should be easy to push back with just finger pressure. It is common for the caliper mounting points to seize up also , dismantle , clean with emery paper and refit using a good quality copper based grease, you can use the silicon stuff if you prefer but copper grease works just fine.
The caliper should move back and forth on its sliders easily, Refit , bleed and check for any leaks
Job Done.....:D

BB
 

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I just did a tire swap on the front of my 84 Aspy and pulled both calipers apart and cleaned all parts with brake cleaner. As I was going back together, I gave everything (all surfaces that move) a nice light coat of Havolin Gold synthetic grease. The pistons, I wiped with some DOT4 brake fluidbefore pushing them back in. The calipers are nice and free and everything moves as should. I can really tell the difference. I used to hear brake noise (rubbing the rotors) while moving. The calipers were all fairly gummed up and were very difficult to move. Everything is so much nicer now.
 

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The front calipers of my '84 1200a are practically seized I am in the process of dismantling them. when I pull the hand brake one piston moves but not the other. The one that moves cannot be pushed back in, even with a clamp. Any tips will be of great help asI have never done this before.I boughtthe bikeabout a month ago.
 

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I just rebuilt my 3 calipers on my '81 GL1100 using the K&L kits from JCWhitney. All the needed parts are included. Brakes are now like new.

When you get the pistons out pull the rubber seal out and I bet you find a crystalized build up in the groove. That was one of the things causing my brakes to bind. It took 120psi air pressure and 5 minutes blowing air in the banjo bolt hole to get the right piston out.

The other thing was the hoses had failed and were collapsing. Replaced the hoses with HEL Stainless brake lines. The old lines were shot.
 

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Greetings new folks!

I used a Dremel tool with a bronze brush and slowed way down with a speed control to clean the grooves in my calipers. It was amazing to me the amount of crud that had built up in there. A light touch was all that was needed and now I have all th brakes I need when I need them on my1983 Interstate.

Regards,

Hobie
 

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Some usefull info here. I am hoping to free up the brakes without having to dismantle the calipers. I have a dremel which I hope will be usefull. Thanks for the tips.
 

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If you want the brakes to operate properly and safely and not fail or lock up on you it's going to take a teardown and rebuild of the calipers. Look at your brake pads, if one of the pair is worn a good bit more than the other it's a signal that your caliper is frozen and can't move side to side to even out the brake pressure. This leads to poor breaking and possibly a locked up wheel. You really should polish up the pistons, clean out the cylinders, replace the rubber seals and clean and free up the mounting sleeves. If the sleeves are stuck and don't move freely there will be problems.

You have a nice bike treat her right and she'll take care of you.
 

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I agre with paul in that you cannot forget to look at the sleeves (the last place I looked when I was having trouble) they allow the brakes to go back to a neutral position, if they are not working properly the brake will continue to be held against the rotor. I pulled mione out and it was all corroded, cleaned it up and used anti-seize and it works great now
 

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I took out the old pads they were worn evenly but needed replacing. I used a 'G' clamp to push the pistons back home pulled the levers to to push them out again. There was no sign of corrosion. I was able to push the pistons back home again without using the clamp. I cleaned them, and coated them with copper grease and re fitted them on to the bike. i hav'nt had a chance to test them yet other commitments and very bad weather. IfI am still not happy with them after testing I will take your good advice and start again. Thanks again.

My next job will be more fun. The alternator is kaput :D
 

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Hey bigdog :waving: How ya doing?

Mycalipers on minewere sensitive to the humidity. Some days it seemed to be ok, then before the week was over, I was unable to even move the bike as the calipers were sticking really bad. I took mine apart and cleaned the grooves really well and out new seals in. More of peace of mind than anything, but when that cager :Xpulls out in front of me, the last thought I want to have is "are my brakes ok?" Hopefully, you will not have to deal with yours if all is well.

Take care :action:
 

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If the caliper pistons were stuck pushing them back in or pumping them out isn't going to do the seal or dust boot any good. There is no way the pistons can stick unless the seals have adhered to the piston or the piston has corroded to the cylinder. Either way you will damage the seal when moving the piston. If there's enough corrosion to stick the piston to the cylinder wall it's going to damage the seal as it goes by when the piston comes out. If the seal is stuck to the piston it's going to tear off some rubber when the piston moves. The seals may hold for awhile, but they've been damaged if the pistons ever stuck and then has been moved in or out. Likewise the Honda and Clymer manuals both call for lubing all the brake parts, piston, dust boot, seal, and cylinder with brake fluid before assembling. If the piston resists going into the cylinder with new seals try twisting it while pushing it in. I don't use any kind of grease on the piston since I'm not sure what type grease is compatible with the seals or the brake fluid. Brake maintenance is the most important kind of work you can do on a bike, it doesn't pay to try to save a buck on the brake system. If the engine rattles or quits it's not likely to kill you, if a set of mickey moused brakes fails it just might.
 

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Your right in what you say. I was afraid to test the brakes.( Although I did'nt get time to take the bike out)I have already decided to dismantle the brakes and do a proper job. last thing I want is for the brakes to fail when I need them most. Thanks again.
 

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A little more checking and I found a reference in the 1100 manual that recommends wiping the pistons with DOT3 or silicon grease prior to insertion into the caliper. For myself I never like greasing the pistons, it can hold grit on the exposed part of the piston and help it get dragged into the seal.
 

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I always use DOT 3 brake fluid on the piston/seal.

Silicon grease on the slides makes them smooth.

A thin film on the back of the pad that contacts the piston stops any squealing.
 

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ok, so i am just getting around now to doing this job. turns out, my piston ARE stuck to the sleeve - seems to be corrosion. any advice on freeing them? will pumping them full of liquid wrench hurt?
 
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