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I recently installed a used "clean gas tank" on my bike and it is running rough. I would like to attempt to do my carbs but everyone I talk to tells me to let the professionals do it. I am an instrument mechanic by trade and am use to dealing with fine adjustments and the lot. Would I be getting in over my head? The other issue is that I can buy after market carb kits for $17 Can. or OEM kits for $54 Can. What would be the difference other than being gouged by Honda. What other parts would I need besides the carb kits? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
 

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Tommyrich,

You can do the job. The price alone:cooldevil:may provide you withthe incentive to do the job. Just take your time and do not be in any hurry. I purchased an 81 GL1100 that had been sitting idle for to years with no stabalizer added to the fuel. Needless to say the carbs were a mess. Getting the carbs off of the bike was more of a PITA than the actual cleaning. It is a tight fit and you need to be careful. First time I took them off took about 2 hours ( I had to take them off and put back on 5 times before I got mine cleaned correctly).

You will need to disconnect all of the applicable hoses, choke, and throttle linkage. The throttle linkage is difficult as you do not have much room to manuver and you could bend the cable and linkage if you are not careful. This will take a while - especially your first time. You will also need to remove the 2 covers on the carbs that are located on the fuel pump (right side when sitting on the bike) side of the bike (Make certain that you mark each cover so they are installed on the correct carburetor). You need to remove these to allow the carbs to fit thru the frame when removing them. This is a tight fit as I mentioned earlier. DO NOT force the carb set out - although you will have a great urge to do so. Work it out slowly and you will eventually get it.

Once you have the carbs off of the bike, make certain that you get all of the passages cleaned out - especially the pilot circuit which affects your idle. I used my air compressor with gun attachment and rubber tip to blow air thru the passages. Hopefully yours are not as bad as mine were and are not clogged.

Clean out the fuel bowls (this will be painfully obvious when you look at them) and check/clean the needle valve and seat. I cleaned the entire assemblies with carb cleaner.

If you did not mess with the float level you should be OK, but I would take measurements on all 4 and check if they are all similar. If they are all the same then most likely the levels are OK. This is my theory and has worked for me - the reasoning being that it is unlikely that all 4 floats are calibrated wrong - unless a butcher last worked on the bike.

Do not know about which kit to recommend as I did not replace any components - just cleaned them up.

Make certain that you do not interchage the vacuum pistons (which fit in the covers that were previously removed to get the carbs out) between carburetors when reassembling . Since you marked them accordingly when you removed them this should not be a problem:). It seems that these are particular to each carb. I made this mistake and had to use crocus cloth on the pistons for the 2 carbs that i interchanged on - part of the reason that I had to take the carbs off 5 times , it took me a while to figure out that the pistons were sticking and causing a lean condition.

These are my observations regarding the removal and cleaning of GL1100 carburetors. There are others who are experts with regards to Goldwings who probably have some better advice or additional wisdom to add. Listen carefully to them and you will not go wrong.

Good luck and enjoy!
 

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A great source for carb cleaning and parts is "Randakk Cycle Shakk". He evaulates carb parts and also sells some. It's a super web site if you are looking for information about carb rebuilding. Good Luck...Jack
 

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Tommyrich, I agree with everything Wolfej1 said. I rebuilt my carbs in 2001 so here is my 2 cents worth. At that time my dealer said there was no "kit" part number available from Honda, so we looked at the fische and put kits together. I should have kept a log of the costs but as I remember after I bought all the little parts, I had over $100 in each carb. The only after market kit I could find at the time was from K? and from the forum information available to the time, they were having quality problems. I'm sure that has been fixed by now. There are several options available now so getting parts should be no problem. If the kit you choose does not include them, there is a tiny hole in the center of the slow speed jets. (I removed the carbureator array three times before I found it) Go ahead and replace the air cut off valves and the accelerator pump, they are beyond use by now. Good luck and keep us informed as to how it is going.
 

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I have never rebuilt motorcycle carbs myself though I am mechanically inclined. No one in my area works on older bikes so I tackled it myself. I just read everything i could find on the internet and dug in. I bought the kits from sirius. It was really not hard at all. The hardest part for me was setting the float height. I ended up getting a oven pan (don't tell my wife) and with the carb setting in it, kept fiddling with it until I got it right.
Before I rebuilt the carbs, I did have a flat spot at around 3600 RPM. I read on some sites various fixes for this and some other things. I tried these fixes, but in the end, I just put it all back together without any of the fixes. The bike runs great and no flat spots at any RPM.

I will say the needles from Sirius were not quite right. The bike ran better with the old needles in it (cleaned of course)

On most aftermarket float valves, they apparently do not come with the screen filter. I just popped the ones off the old needle valve and put them on the new ones. You can buy OEM ones with the screen for alot more money, but the screens just pop right off. I would not run it without the screen as , in my opinion, you are just asking for dirt to clog the valve.

The biggest thing is make sure you synch the carbs when you are done. I did not have a synchronizer and instead of waiting, I made the one mentioned on the internet using clear tube and 2 cycle oil. It was sort of a pain as it takes awhile for the oil to settle if the carbs are way off, but it did work and made all the difference in the world.
Just take your time, have a very clean area and pay attention to the things in the Clymer manual that are wrong (mentioned on various sites).
If I can do it, you can do it
 
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