Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
510 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

Ok, so it's time to rebuild both brake M/C's, and I want to know what I'm in for...



I've rebuilt a M/C on a yamamahahaha before, and it was horrible. The retaining ring was WAY down inside of a super narrow well, and I had to make my own removal / installation tool to get in there. Am I likely to see something similar on the wing?

Anyone experienced on rebuilding M/C's on the 1200's willing to give me some "hints"?

For reference, it is a 1984 1200 Interstate, and I'll be playing with the Front and rear brakemaster cylinders. (Clutch seems ok for now...)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
510 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
imported post

come on guys... I know at least one of you has ventured here... :baffled:



My :12red:doesn't like to stop too well right now, so I'm going to try and attack this over the weekend.





By the way, has anyone noticed all of the profane smileys we have to choose from?

:3sum:(3sum) and :bananas:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,473 Posts
imported post

hey philcsand,

What makes you thing the M/C needs to be rebuilt? Is it leaking fluid at the M/C bowl or lever? If not, you may just need to bleed the brake lines!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,148 Posts
imported post

Me thinks Teacher is getting warm here... If there are no leaks, why the rebuild?

I'm thinking the calipers need work.. Sticking pistons will present the same situation you are experiencing. Especially if you just put new pucks in. The claliper pistons must be clean and shinny all the way down to the end of travel, or they will stick in the bores.

If the M/Cs are not leaking, take the time to remove the calipers, pump the two pistons out as far as possible without popping them out, and insure that they are clean. As always, if the pads are worn down, replace them at this time.. Reassemble and bleed, bleed, bleed the brake system, front and rear.

Let us know what you find..

Let's see,,,,,,,,, Raunchy smiley..... Here you go!:2finger:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
510 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
imported post

the lines are 100% bled.

The problem is that I need to pump the brakes to build up pressure. If I just grab the front brake, not a whole lot happens. I need to pull a few times, THEN it works sorta. The rear needs 1 press / release, then it's ok. It'll stop without, it just sinks to the stops. THAT sounds like brake fluid is getting past the head of the plunger.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
623 Posts
imported post

Phil, My 84 brakes are exactly as you describe. Pretty weak. Just got done bleeding the brakes profusely and cleaning all the caliper slide pins. The slide pins were sticking a little I think, but I really think the old rubber lines have just outlived their usefull life. i think their expanding so much that the MC can't push enough fluid in one stroke to build enough pressure. I realize this is not a direct answer to your question.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
510 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
imported post

Hmm...

That's food for thought.

I may look into replacing with goodrich SS lines. I did that on my 1980 KZ, and it made a world of difference.



Do you know what size banjo fitting is required?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
623 Posts
imported post

Sorry don't know what size the banjo fiitings are, I think the copper crush washers are included with the brake line kits. I know Jim Venne at http://www.vencowings.com/index2.htmlcarries brake line kits for the 1200's. Very nice guy to deal with.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
510 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
imported post

At $261 for a kit, I'd rather build it off the rack at my local motorcycle shop. With goodrige lines, you just choose the length, and then the end fittings. It'll probably end up costing me about $120 to do it that way...

First thing is I'm going ot have one more go at bleeding the lines. I'm going to try the reverse-purge. (Forcing clean fluid IN to the bleed valve.)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
623 Posts
imported post

OUCH ! I had no idea they were that expensive. How do i contact another source? Thanks George.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
510 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
imported post

What I'm going to try and do is figure out what size banjo fittings the goldwing uses, and then I'll go to my motorcycle parts place, and buy the parts needed. If I can find the parts, I'll post a list of goodrige part numbers, and total cost in case someone else wants to make their own lines.

but first I need to know the banjo fitting size. I feel another thread coming!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
760 Posts
imported post

On my wifes 82 I took an oldhose down to a local hose supply store here in Tulsa. They made a replacement hose with stainless for 36 dollars.
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

Pumping the brakes to get pressure is almost always air in the lines. Since you're going to replace the lines anyway, why don't you take one of the brake lines such as the short flexible piece on the rear caliper with you? But before replacing you lines why not try some aggressive bleeding?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
imported post

I had a similar problem with the front brakes on my 81 GL1100 Interstate. Kind of spongy, just not right when I squeezed them the first time. I could not find the problem so I rebuilt the master cylinder and both calipers. I bled the system repeatedly with my mighty-vac, I also bled it several times using the syringe method to force brake fluid into the system through the bleeders. No improvement in the brakes at all.



I finally replaced all 3 front lines with a stainless steel lines from Spiegler. The 3 line kit was about $140.00, I received the lines in just few days and it fixed the problem.

http://www.spieglerusa.com/
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
419 Posts
imported post

You don't need special tools to rebuild teh GL1200 MC. A standard circlip pliers will do fine. This is one of the ewasier MCs to strip. Same can't be said for bleeding, you will probably spend a bit of time on that. :waving:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,824 Posts
imported post

Bleeding the brake lines in an older M/C Wing is a bit of a time consuming and patient requirement. The old lady I now drive, 1980 GL1100 needed the front and rear done simply because I was totally unaware of the condition. They neither leaked nor were spongy, but the bleed down and inspection paid off in big ways. Both were neglected and along with brake fluid was an unknown crud and jelly substance. All rubbers tested OK.

The end result was that my life was saved days later in a panic stop that worked. The pressure build up in any hydraulic system cannot rely on a retry. In an emergency you need all the grip you have and the piston, plunger cylinder will deliver all the pressure available only if no air, no crud, no water and no other contaminants are in the line.

Air can be compressed and as such will reduce the acting pressure placed upon the cylinders, pistons of the brake caliper. So all air needs to be expelled and it may take a long frustrating time, since you do not want the piston on the hand grip nor the piston on the foot pedal to move beyond the physical ends of the piston travel. So use short strokes and a lot of them, do not pump in the initail stages of evacuating air since this will turbulate the air and you will not even see the very minute bubbles. If you do, take a break and come back to it later while the small air bubbles move up the system.

Be patient and be sure you end with a brake feel that is hard. Listen for the calipers sending out the pistons and returning. Take your time it will save your life.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
623 Posts
imported post

Philcsand, Hope this reply finds your brakes healthy. I was wondering how you made out sourcing aftermarket brake lines? Did you find out what size and type the banjo fittings are? Did you have any luck with goodrige. It's been a few months now and i was curious. George.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
296 Posts
imported post

Hondda MC's are easy to rebuild, the circlips are easy to get at and no special tools are needed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
510 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
imported post

well gkiesel,
I didn't get around to sourcing the lines. I don't have a spare $200 lying around to do the conversion. I did rebuild the front MC, and I flushed all the hydraulic systems. That seems to help out some. I read in one of my manuals that the symptoms I was seeing was indicitive of dirty abutment surfaces in the calipers. I haven't gotten around to looking at that, but I will eventually. As it is now, the braking power is such that when I am riding solo (which I do exclusively) there is more than enough. Add an extra couple of hundred pounds, and it may get to be a bit of an issue, so before the 2up season gets back I'll make sure to get to the absolute bottom of the problem.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
623 Posts
imported post

Hey, thanks for the update.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top