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Honda is saying that in the brake recall currently underway it is ok to have the rear wheel not spin freely. Under the test the bike will only fail if it requires more than 11.2 lbs of force to make the rear wheel turn. How can it be acceptable to have any drag at all?? It's one thing to apply the brake when you want it, another thing altogether to have a constant drag on the rear wheel.
 

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You have some brake drag if the brake was applied just prior to the test, it's running down the road that knocks the pads back.

You have a certain "brake-a-way drag" associated with wheel bearings packed with grease and turning the final drive in it's lube and the d-shaft and the various seals on shafts that turn.

:?It all adds up. :weightlifter:








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All disk brakes will drag on release and I don't have a clue what is tolerable, but that may be the initial drag right after brake release.. and that sounds okay to me.. it would have to lighten up though as you drive on... 11 lbs at 50 ft/sec (~35mph) is 1 horsepower or about 750 watts heating up that disc... it would be smoking in no time..
 

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Thanks for the input. I am trying to understand the process. My wife's bike had total failure and the reserve cylinder was replaced. After fixing the problem they did the initial test and her rear tire was totally freed up. My bike would barely turn during the test. I'm sure they will fix the problem, but the idea that there is an acceptable level of drag seems strange to me. I always thought the pads had some mechanism that retracted them.
 

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Disk brakes run essentially zero clearance... That's one of the reasons that they are so efficient and impervious to water... Zero clearance of course, implies that there is some drag there, at least initially, until vibrations, rotor run out, etc., knock the pads back a few thousandths of an inch...

You can feel this difference right after doing a brake job and the pads are still not in contact with your wheel... Rotate the wheel and see how free it spins... Then apply the brakes and spin the wheel again - there will be a noticeable difference...

Les
 

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When you release the brake , the rubber seals in the caliper , should retract the piston a little ( look at a new serviced caliper without brake pads , and you will se this ).
When everything is ok ,there is NO drag , after releasing the brake ! (only a little from the transmission ).
 

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Thanks Blacksmith. I'm not a mechanic, what you are describing is in line with the way I thought it should be.
 
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