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Law says no semis will run recaps on steer,and reliable driver would NEVER use recap tires on steer axle
FMCSA 393.75
(d) No bus shall be operated with regrooved, recapped or retreaded tires on the front wheels.
(e) A regrooved tire with a load-carrying capacity equal to or greater than 2,232 kg (4,920 pounds) shall not be used on the front wheels of any truck or truck tractor.

There is a difference between regrooved and recapped
 

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FMCSA 393.75
(d) No bus shall be operated with regrooved, recapped or retreaded tires on the front wheels.
(e) A regrooved tire with a load-carrying capacity equal to or greater than 2,232 kg (4,920 pounds) shall not be used on the front wheels of any truck or truck tractor.

There is a difference between regrooved and recapped
Yeah some tires are regroovable but they are usually used on trailer
 

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I drove for company that would only run recapped tires on the drive axels,his theory was if the cap comes off the drive axel the trailer will slow the motion of the errant cap,he only run new tire on the trailer thinking the won’t fail as fast as recapped and he didn’t want the trailer tire cap come off and do damage to cars
 

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All tires have the tread put on in a mold last. If a new tire is run low on air it will loose its tread just like any other.If the recap is done by a good company their will be no problems.Drivers not checking thing is a large part og the problem.
 

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Cihilb posted:
"Most tires will have either a red dot or yellow dot on the tires. These indicate the light spot of the tire.
On motorcycle rims and some alloy car rims, there also may be a dot on the rim. This is the heavy spot on the rim. Aligning the dots will bring the wheel and tire closer to balance. Less weights will be needed."



Try explaining those dots to the monkey changing your car tires. He won't know...and won't want to know.
 

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Cihilb posted:
"Most tires will have either a red dot or yellow dot on the tires. These indicate the light spot of the tire.
On motorcycle rims and some alloy car rims, there also may be a dot on the rim. This is the heavy spot on the rim. Aligning the dots will bring the wheel and tire closer to balance. Less weights will be needed."



Try explaining those dots to the monkey changing your car tires. He won't know...and won't want to know.
I learned the hard way that trailer tires should be replaced every 4-5 years regardless of tread depth, including steel-belted radials. I was towing my boat with tandem axle and my daughter following me. Next thing I know she was pelted with rubber as I quickly pulled to the side. My right rear tire blew the rubber off of it, damaging a 1/4" plate steel fender and leaving a tire with metal shards sticking out all over the place. Tires looked like new, actually perhaps 10 years old, and garage kept. Tire shop said that trailer tires need to be replaced, as I said, every 4-5 years, period. I'm in the auto parts biz, so I asked many more trailers shops who said the same thing. I think its because of the way steering axis inclination twists the tires when cornering, especially when backing into a spot on a 90 degree angle. A friend sent me an article on bike tires many years ago stating that they, too, ought to be replaced on calendar year even if tread looks good. Sorry, can't find the article. I do replace my bike tires at 5 year intervals. Cheap insurance to cover my *ss!
 

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Cihilb posted:
"Most tires will have either a red dot or yellow dot on the tires. These indicate the light spot of the tire.
On motorcycle rims and some alloy car rims, there also may be a dot on the rim. This is the heavy spot on the rim. Aligning the dots will bring the wheel and tire closer to balance. Less weights will be needed."



Try explaining those dots to the monkey changing your car tires. He won't know...and won't want to know.
Usually the dot on the rim that corresponds with the dot on the tire is long gone. They put a dot on the rim at the factory so the tire can be installed in the best position but it's not a permanent dot. Aligning the dot with the valve stem is an old wives tale.
 

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It definitely is because:

of the severe Side Wall Stresses when turning extremely tight corners.
if you are outside and looking at the tire on a trailer, and the driver turns as sharp as possible, the sidewalls will flex sideways as much as two (2) inches....

I did that several times....
the 1st time was in Arizona with our 34' triple axle Avion.
I had 6 ply truck tires on it, because I thought they were "hell for stout".

we moved from Arizona to Oklahoma, and 5 of those truck tires blew out before we made it to Yukon, OK.
1 near shamrock, TX
1 near Sayer, OK
1 near Clinton, OK
2 just before Yukon, OK

I had 6 tires mounted up on it, yup, truck tires, I only had 150 more miles to go, and my wallet was busted. and they are all still holding air, and look brand new, at 10 years of age.
it will never leave here though, it is now a Hobby House for baubles for my daughter's business.

I now also have a 26 ft Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler:
I bought 4 brand new Goodyear Premium, 10 ply tires for it, and their Lifetime Extended Tread wear warranty.....

they are replaced for the life of the thread, if any is left, no matter the age.
 
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