Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
407 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

Why in the hell would anyone want to call a license plate a "Reg Plate"?

I've been working on wiring for three days. I mounted it and lighted it using nothing but stainless and LED's. The only light on the bike that is not LED is the 60 Watt headlamp. I'm sure that research and human inventivenes will correct that soon. My harnass is rock solid and bullet proof soldered and well insulated and well located conductors. I called a friend tonight and told him that after tonight's effort, the only thing missing from my new born bike would be gasoline and oil. In less than two days he would be hearing me pull into his driveway.



I ran my Wing to keep the battery charged today. Sounded nice. Nowhere near a British bike though. Sorry.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
410 Posts
imported post

TominDallas wrote:
Why in the hell would anyone want to call a license plate a "Reg Plate"?
It means Registration Plate. :smiler:

Very nice work I have to say. I look forward to seeing pictures when she is finished and ready for the road.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,185 Posts
imported post

In the UK all vehicles are allocated a Registration number, by the Driving and Vehicle Licencing Authority (DVLA) in Swansea, South Wales. This number is allocated to the vehicle when it is first registered for being driven on the road and the first keeper is responsible for getting the Registration plate made up,( or actually the garage usually does it on your behalf) with the correct letters and numbers in place on the plate.
The plate stays with the vehicle for the duration of it's life.
The very first registration plate was A1 and we have seen a variety of combinations of letters and numbers, over the many years, as more and more vehicles have been sold.

All plates must meet an exacting shape and size and the font must be a correct size and type too. Motorcycles used to have plates front and rear, but the front, mudguard mounted ones, were disbanded many years ago due to them being dangerous in the case of an accident.
Motorcycle plates must be square with the first set of numbers above the second set, unlike cars that can have rectangular plates with all the letters and numbers on the same line.

:waving::waving:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
593 Posts
imported post

Silverfox, "Rego" (registration) plates in Queensland. An annual Rego sticker is issued when the "rego" is paid - at least the GW windshield is a handy spot for the sticker. As with cars, its a nuisance to have to peel it off & replace it annually - 5 minutes better used elsewhere. From what I see of interstate cars & bikes, that is pretty well the same throughout Australia.
Similarly, the front plates were abolished here many years ago for bikes/
Plates are issued by the State Transport Dept & can be personalised at a cost, so they are not restricted to the one bike (or even vehicle) for its life
Interesting these varying quirks over such a physically small item/
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
710 Posts
imported post

Here's another "silly British" one..why do we call the luggage area in a car the BOOT? After all, when you go out walking you don't carry anything into your boots!

Maybe we need a new thread started on the ridiculous names that have grown up with us and perhaps some members might have some history on how it came about they can share.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,076 Posts
imported post

John Goodell wrote:
TominDallas wrote:
Why in the hell would anyone want to call a license plate a "Reg Plate"?
It means Registration Plate. :smiler:

Very nice work I have to say. I look forward to seeing pictures when she is finished and ready for the road.
Im British and ive always known it as a license plate maybe they changed it way back in time from a reg plate to a license plate
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,235 Posts
imported post

So.. what's the story on calling a toilet "the loo"?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
imported post

us385south wrote:
So.. what's the story on calling a toilet "the loo"?
why is it called a JOHN on your side of the pond?:)



Alan Y
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,235 Posts
imported post

Pot, crapper, head, commode, throne... etc.,etc.,etc.

I have no clue whatsoever...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,185 Posts
imported post

us385south wrote:
So.. what's the story on calling a toilet "the loo"?

What is the origin of the word 'loo'?

There are several theories about the origin of this informal British term for a toilet. The first, and most popular, is that it derived from the cry of 'gardyloo' (from the French regardez l'eau 'watch out for the water'), which was shouted by medieval servants as they emptied chamber pots out of upstairs windows into the street. This is historically problematic, since by the time the term 'loo' is recorded, the expression 'gardyloo' was long obsolete.

A second theory is that the word derives from a polite use of the French term le lieu ('the place') as a euphemism. Unfortunately, documentary evidence to support this idea is lacking.

A third theory refers to the trade name 'Waterloo', which appeared prominently displayed on the iron cisterns in many British outhouses during the early 20th century. This is more credible in terms of dates, but corroborating evidence is still frustratingly hard to find. Various other colourful theories also circulate, involving references to doors numbered '00' or people called 'Looe'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,235 Posts
imported post

Ah... good stories. My overly etymological nature has been momentarily satiated.

Thank you Silverfox...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,185 Posts
imported post

us385south wrote:
My overly etymological nature has been momentarily satiated. 
You might want to see a Doctor about that. :shock::ROFL:
 

·
Still Learning
Joined
·
13,270 Posts
imported post

Crapper came from the inventor's last name Crapper. From England no less.
Ah, a name gone down in history......

Thomas Crapper (baptised 28 September 1836; died 27 January 1910) was a plumber who founded Thomas Crapper & Co in London. Contrary to widespread misconceptions, Crapper did not invent the flush toilet. He did, however, do much to increase the popularity of the toilet, and developed some important related inventions, such as the ballcock. He was noted for the quality of his products and received several royal warrants.

Manhole covers with Crapper's company's name on them in Westminster Abbey are now one of London's minor tourist attractions.[2][3] Thomas Crapper & Co owned the world's first bath, toilet and sink showroom, in King's Road until 1966. The firm's lavatorial equipment was manufactured at premises in nearby Marlborough Road (now Draycott Avenue).

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/crapper#ixzz1k1XHanka
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,235 Posts
imported post

Not to drift too far off topic but, yep... I knew that. Oddly... I have a rather keen interest in manhole covers... see my gallery HERE.

Weird, I know...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,185 Posts
imported post

Thanks guys for reminding me why I enjoy coming here so much, where else could a thread meander from a relatively straight forward subject of reg plates and rebuilds, on to water closets and drain hole covers. :D
 

·
Still Learning
Joined
·
13,270 Posts
imported post

Just kinda goin down the tubes eh?
 

·
Still Learning
Joined
·
13,270 Posts
imported post

That is quite a collection of covers you have going, just watch out for the buses!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
276 Posts
imported post

I was stationed at RAF Bentwaters in 1980.
Had a 1964 Ford Cortina, Reg POO604D.
Loved that little car.
My mechanic, Peter Lister, Ipswitch, called it POO, cause it was a piece of....poo.
 

·
Still Learning
Joined
·
13,270 Posts
imported post

I remember the Cortina as poo too, then came the courier.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top