Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
24,835 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I loaded up a bunch of 45 acp & 223 ammo back in the early 90s. A 50 cal ammo can full of each. Have been shooting some of it now and then ever since. Recently at least 1/2 of them come out with the brass split. I even pulled some of the bullets out of the 45s to check the powder charge and the brass split when pulling the bullets with a kinetic puller. Probably most people don't keep ammo around that long but wondering if anyone has any ideas on this. The only thing I can come up with is the fact that this was before I started using latex gloves to handle cleaned brass and my finger prints are etched into them, maybe that weakened the brass.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,769 Posts
Perhaps but wondering if the cases were virgin when you reloaded... We know that every time you fire a round, the case stretches a bit... Just wondering if the cases were reloaded several times before or perhaps you bought reloads when you purchased and one does not know the history of the shell casing when one does that - just some food for thought...

I use .45acp reloads most of the time and have never seen a split casing before on the reloads I use... If your powder charge is within limits, my money would be on stretched cases for whatever reasons...

Les
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
24,835 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Perhaps but wondering if the cases were virgin when you reloaded... We know that every time you fire a round, the case stretches a bit... Just wondering if the cases were reloaded several times before or perhaps you bought reloads when you purchased and one does not know the history of the shell casing when one does that - just some food for thought...

I use .45acp reloads most of the time and have never seen a split casing before on the reloads I use... If your powder charge is within limits, my money would be on stretched cases for whatever reasons...

Les
They wouldn't have been reloads if they were virgin brass.:grin3: They were all once fired brass. The strange part is that they were good until recently as I get closer to using the last of them.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
24,835 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Some powders are mildly caustic and what ever you used has had a long time to eat at the brass.
No, black powder is corrosive but modern smokeless powders are not. Besides that the cases split from the mouth well above the base of the bullet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,769 Posts
They wouldn't have been reloads if they were virgin brass.:grin3: They were all once fired brass. The strange part is that they were good until recently as I get closer to using the last of them.
You misunderstood Dave... You can buy either virgin cases or once fired cases or perhaps multiple fired cases... My point being how many times were they fired previously??? If only once as you say, then I would expect the cases from the get-go...

I recently fired some 30 Carbine ammo that was at least 40 years old and aside from one or two misfires in a hundred rounds or so, there was no other problems... So, to sum up, could have been case deterioration for whatever reason but I would suspect it was the cases to begin with... Might want to think twice about shooting the balance of them though...

Les
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
24,835 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
You misunderstood Dave... You can buy either virgin cases or once fired cases or perhaps multiple fired cases... My point being how many times were they fired previously??? If only once as you say, then I would expect the cases from the get-go...

I recently fired some 30 Carbine ammo that was at least 40 years old and aside from one or two misfires in a hundred rounds or so, there was no other problems... So, to sum up, could have been case deterioration for whatever reason but I would suspect it was the cases to begin with... Might want to think twice about shooting the balance of them though...

Les
No misunderstanding, I was just making a joke. Virgin brass would be hand loads, not reloads. I have fired a lot of very old ammo without a problem also, that's why I am puzzled by this. It was supposed to be once fired brass form Midway.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,761 Posts
Look around on the internet for "Seasonal Cracking" of loaded ammo. Possible bad annealing of brass from the factory. Now I have to go check on my old ammo stores.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
24,835 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Look around on the internet for "Seasonal Cracking" of loaded ammo. Possible bad annealing of brass from the factory. Now I have to go check on my old ammo stores.
Interesting. I wonder if having the ammo can lined with newspaper could have anything to do with it?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,769 Posts
I think it was just bad brass - which was my entire point of the past 3 posts...:ROFL:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
24,835 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I think it was just bad brass - which was my entire point of the past 3 posts...:ROFL:
I have a hard time with that theory since it didn't happen with the same batch until recently.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,633 Posts
Dont know much about this , but i think i remember someone from my military days (25 years of service , many of them as a tank commander and some years as instructor in explosives ) talked about gunpowder or explosives could get old and burn to fast ??
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
24,835 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Dont know much about this , but i think i remember someone from my military days (25 years of service , many of them as a tank commander and some years as instructor in explosives ) talked about gunpowder or explosives could get old and burn to fast ??
There is some truth to that but it wouldn't explain why some of them split when I pulled the bullets.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
24,835 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Look up the Mfg website, contact with an email, send a sample for their lab to study, receive their results....problem solved.
More trouble than it's worth. They would just conclude something out of their control happened to it and like I said IT DID NOT ALL DO IT, JUST WHAT I HAVE FIRED RECENTLY GETTING DOWN TO THE LAST OF IT. I have a 3 lb coffee can full of it that did not split.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
24,835 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I think I finally figured out why the brass was splitting. I discovered my sizing die was making a small scratch in the brass vertically, must have always and I didn't notice it, and the brass always split vertically. Apparently the scratch weakened it. Returned the die to Hornady and they sent me a new one, no more scratches.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top