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Discussion Starter #1
At least about the products they sell. I have a 5hp briggs that needs a carburetor diaphragm so I went to a small engine shop with the part, handed it to the man at the counter, told him what it was for and asked if he had one. He asked if I had the engine model and serial #, I just took it back and walked out. Came home and searched on the web, there are 2 possibilities and it's quite obvious which is which. Back before the computer age a parts person would have just walked back to the shelf and got one.
 

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Magic Moderator
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Exactly and they had a large inventory so there was no need to order one for the customer and then have them wait for it to come in leaving you with a piece of machinery you cannot use for days.
 

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Junior Grue
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It use to was that a parts person was also a mechanic.

It seems that now a parts person just has to know how to use a mouse, keyboard is optional.
 

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the local small engine repair shop does their own work, but, they too refer first to the engine/model number and then get a parts fische and then go to the parts drawers.

amazingly those drawers had what I wanted, a small spring to go on the throttle of my lawnmower. he said it is a very common part for people to loose.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
the local small engine repair shop does their own work, but, they too refer first to the engine/model number and then get a parts fische and then go to the parts drawers.

amazingly those drawers had what I wanted, a small spring to go on the throttle of my lawnmower. he said it is a very common part for people to loose.
I'm sure there are things that are less common and the model # helps but when there are 2 choices it's simple enough to pick up a package and compare "that's not it" and get the other one.
 

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How about when you go into the shop, hand them the part, they look at the part and tell you that's the first time they ever saw one of these
 

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I used to work on small engines. Along with the model number, there may be a "type" number. The type number will help the parts person in identifying the parts used on that particular engine. A lot of manufacturers used parts from different suppliers.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I used to work on small engines. Along with the model number, there may be a "type" number. The type number will help the parts person in identifying the parts used on that particular engine. A lot of manufacturers used parts from different suppliers.
I understand that but again, there are only 2 choices for a 5hp horizontal shaft briggs & stratton engine, an old style and a new style diaphragm, easily distinguished from each other.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
try handing the cashier a 20 and a 1, plus a nickel- for a bill of $11.05
Sit back and watch the gears grind and jump the track...the register has to tell them to give you back a 10!
I do that all the time. You sure get some confuzzed looks. :ROFL:
 

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Toolcraft4100
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Is that two or four wheel drive?


I have a '96 Suburban and went to my regular auto parts store for a front door hinge pin and bushing kit. The guy asked me if it was 2wd or 4wd. Then he asked me what motor it has. I don't want to be a smarta** so I go along with it. Then his computer says he hasn't got one. So I told him that there are millions of Chevy trucks on the road and that's a common part to wear out and I can't believe he hasn't got one and I leave the store. As I'm getting into my truck with the sagging drivers door the manager runs out and tells me they have the part I need, but it was in the wrong bin. So I followed him back in and bought it. I don't want to be a grumpy old guy, but sometimes it takes an extra effort.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I have a '96 Suburban and went to my regular auto parts store for a front door hinge pin and bushing kit. The guy asked me if it was 2wd or 4wd. Then he asked me what motor it has. I don't want to be a smarta** so I go along with it. Then his computer says he hasn't got one. So I told him that there are millions of Chevy trucks on the road and that's a common part to wear out and I can't believe he hasn't got one and I leave the store. As I'm getting into my truck with the sagging drivers door the manager runs out and tells me they have the part I need, but it was in the wrong bin. So I followed him back in and bought it. I don't want to be a grumpy old guy, but sometimes it takes an extra effort.
All they know how to do is punch it into the computer, if you go online to search for parts it makes you do the same thing they do. Those hinge pins are usually on the HELP shelf. I lube my hinges when I service my 94 silverado, 250,000+ miles and hasn't needed any yet.
 

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I used to work in a Welding Supply store and Auto Paint. We had a bookkeeper that would help out on the counter when it got busy. A customer would bring in a welding tip as a sample and we would go to the drawer that had tips in it and pick the tip that matched the sample, the bookkeeper would ask the guy the make and model of the torch and look up the # of the tip and hand the customer the box. Then the customer would look at the tip in the box and say this tip doesn't match and the bookkeeper would tell the customer that was the right tip because it says so in the book. Anyway we all had a good laugh watching Bill try to tell this guy that was the right tip. Then we would take the sample back and get the right part. Sometimes the customer has no idea what kind of torch he has so you just give him something that matches the sample. That is why he brought the sample in the first place.
Dave a company name Dormin used to make those Hinge pins for Chev trucks. Today Help has Some of the small parts but Dormin had a big inventory of small parts and great quality.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I used to work in a Welding Supply store and Auto Paint. We had a bookkeeper that would help out on the counter when it got busy. A customer would bring in a welding tip as a sample and we would go to the drawer that had tips in it and pick the tip that matched the sample, the bookkeeper would ask the guy the make and model of the torch and look up the # of the tip and hand the customer the box. Then the customer would look at the tip in the box and say this tip doesn't match and the bookkeeper would tell the customer that was the right tip because it says so in the book. Anyway we all had a good laugh watching Bill try to tell this guy that was the right tip. Then we would take the sample back and get the right part. Sometimes the customer has no idea what kind of torch he has so you just give him something that matches the sample. That is why he brought the sample in the first place.
Dave a company name Dormin used to make those Hinge pins for Chev trucks. Today Help has Some of the small parts but Dormin had a big inventory of small parts and great quality.

A lot of the parts in the help section are Dorman.
 

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try handing the cashier a 20 and a 1, plus a nickel- for a bill of $11.05
Sit back and watch the gears grind and jump the track...the register has to tell them to give you back a 10!
Try handing them the dollar and the nickle after they have punched in $20 at the register. That gets them everytime...
 

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Shut down the line! Call a manager, need a key (sound of sirens)

regarding matching the part: Jet airliner windshield bolts get replaced with a new panel of glass.
In this example of a European airline, Mechanic goes to bin and matches up the bolts, sends aircraft out the door.
Subsequent flight, the windshield popped out, sucking the pilot halfway out of the airplane--

Investigation found prior mechanic used a bolt a few threads shorter than specified by part number,
instead of looking up correct number and picking it from correct bin.
The next guy used the same mistake to continue the problem.

Could have been worst crash on record, a cabin steward held onto the pilots feet so he didnt disappear!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Shut down the line! Call a manager, need a key (sound of sirens)

regarding matching the part: Jet airliner windshield bolts get replaced with a new panel of glass.
In this example of a European airline, Mechanic goes to bin and matches up the bolts, sends aircraft out the door.
Subsequent flight, the windshield popped out, sucking the pilot halfway out of the airplane--

Investigation found prior mechanic used a bolt a few threads shorter than specified by part number,
instead of looking up correct number and picking it from correct bin.
The next guy used the same mistake to continue the problem.

Could have been worst crash on record, a cabin steward held onto the pilots feet so he didnt disappear!
So I guess I shouldn't use the diaphragm I got off ebay, by matching it to the picture, even though it is a perfect fit. Now this garden tiller might cause an earthquake. :ROFL:
 

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matching Pic is one thing....
Matching up a wrong bolt could result in the lawnmower blade slicing a foot or two off your height.

Please practice safe sex, we have enough Earthquakes in Ca. already!
 
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