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I'm changing the brake pads in my 82 1100I and I'm trying to figure out how to remove the pins that hold the pads in.



Could use a little information on this one, I've tried pulling them out with a pliers and tapping on the other end with a hammer, nothings moving. So before I do something stupid and really muck it up, how do these things come out? I've gone through the manual and all it says is to remove them, not how to.
 

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what are they stuck? if they are take a punch and a hammer and give them a good lick or two. that should break the glaze. i trust you've already removed the pad pin retainers.
 

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Yes, I removed the clip that holds the pins in, but the pins don't want to come out. I didn't want to start hitting them only to find out that there is another, less violent, way to remove them.
 

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Sometimes wiggling the pads while you pull on the pins helps. Yours may be stuck more than normal though. Try some penetrating oil.
 

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I used both suggestions, nailed 'em with penetrating oil, waited, then tapped 'em out. All went well.

It was disturbing to find just how bad they were though.
 

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Every time I change my pads I use fine sand paper to clean the pads then re-lube them with Moly 60 paste lube just like I use on the hub splines. Haven't froze up on me yet in 2 years.
 

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It is worse on a 1500! They are allen heads, which must be made of junk metal, cause the socket head hole strips out all the time. I had to soak em with PB Blaster, and use a quality ("Craftsman") easyout to get them to budge! I used brake caliper pin lube on the new replacement pins during reassembly with the new pads. Glad you got em out! jimsjinx
 

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One of the handiest tools in working on bikes especially brakes and other dirty or rusty parts is a wire wheel. Ideally an 8" bench grinder with a wire wheel on it but an electric drill clamped down to a table or bench will suffice. With a wire wheel you can clean up bolt threads, various parts and pins and rusty parts. You can't go wrong cleaning up screws and bolts (use a small vise grip to hold them on the wheel) and lubing all of them that thread into aluminum with aluminum anti-seize. You'll thank yourself later on.
 

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Richard, knew you'd get them out. Here's a tip that I don't think is on this thread yet. If the pins were that stuck I'm betting the four pistons that exert pressure on the pads to depress them against the disc are dirty/corroded. It is critical that you clean them. While the pads are off hold the caliper in your hand and squeeze the brake lever or pedal for which ever caliper you're working on. This will pooch the pistons out so you can clean the corrosion off the pistons with some fine wet sand paper. If you don't get that crud off it is likely that when you install the new pads (being as they are thicker than the old ones) when you get the brakes back on they will not retract. The pads will drag and eventually overheat the disc eventually causing the brakes to lock up. Don't let the pistons pop out of the cylinders. Clean them all the way around the back sides of the pistons. It's tight but you can do it. Lubricate them with some brake fluid and squeeze them back into their original position and then install the pads and complete the assembly. Make sure the new pads are not dragging by spinning the wheels by hand. Take it for a short like half mile short test drive, apply all brakes a few times and get off the bike and check to make sure the discs are not overly hot. They will be a little hot to the touch. That's normal but they shouldn't be scorching. Touch all the discs being careful not to burn your fingers and they should all be relatively the same temp to touch. If one is noticeably hotter than the others take note of it. It usually takes a few test rides to get them all seated and working properly. Take a brake bleeder wrench with you on the test drive in case you need to let a little pressure off one of the calipers. And don't get any nicks or deep scratches/gouges on those pistons. Good luck.
 

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Hell, pop them out and clean up the caliper, piston and cup, install new o ring..never take short cuts with your brakes..
 

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If you don't get that crud off it is likely that when you install the new pads (being as they are thicker than the old ones) when you get the brakes back on they will not retract. The pads will drag and eventually overheat the disc eventually causing the brakes to lock up.

This is what happened to me on a poker run last year. Couldn't finish the run, had to get a ride back to the starting point to get the truck and trailer. Thank god I decided to trailer the bike to the run instead of riding it or I would have been stranded on the interstate on the way down.

I completely rebuilt the rear caliper with new seals and completely flushed out all the old brake fluid, bled with my Might-Vac and was good to go. I used emory cloth to clean the pistons and cleaning everything with fresh brake fluid before putting it all back together.

That sucker got so hot it was smoking before I got it off the road, had to jerk the left saddlebag off and cool it down with bottled water before cracking the banjo bolt to free it up to get it on the trailer.

This is the pistons before cleaning.


This is the pistons after cleaning.


This is what I cleaned them up with starting with the coarse and working to the finest.
120 grit on the right, 400 grit in the middle and 1000 grit on the left.
 

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when i put them back together i use antiseize gold.
it is the best antiseize for heated parts on a bike or car
 
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