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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off I'd like to say I'm already way ahead of the game because I've got Vegaswingnut helping me(the man never gives up and I personally think he is a shade tree genius).

That said, after much research online and in both Clymer and the Big Honda service manuals, there is precious little information on the topic. Most of the advice is about removing the airbox and little else. With this thread I plan to end this. I plan to take pictures and maybe video with my phone throughout the process that will be specific to the 93 GL1500 and 1500s in general.

Here is my plan: I'm not a big fan of removing the airbox. It sounds like a tough job that only adds a little better view(someone may want to change my idea on this). Anyway, I did find a tutorial for the same process only for a GL1100 and except for the need to move the carb rack(I don't have one) the procedure seems sound. Disconnect both cables at both ends -> remove one of the cables from the grip end -> tie a heavy gauge wire or piece of string to the bottom of the remaining cable -> pull the remaining cable out from the grip end carefully threading the wire/string though the bike and out the grip end -> attach the wire/string to the bottom of BOTH new cables -> lube the cables -> carefully feed the the cables through the bike from the grip end to the left side. Now this is why I'd rather not remove the airbox, I feel we'll have a better chance of threading the new cables through the bike in the exact pathway of the old cables if the airbox is in place. My gut feeling is the cables will present a real problem getting the airbox back in place after the new cables are in place. Getting the tubes under the box reattached and keeping the box in the right place just sounds like a nightmare we don't need. -> reattach the cables and adjust, which sounds like the toughest part of the job to me, well both disconnecting and reconnecting.
What do you guys think? Are there any "gotchas," that I need to be aware of, do you have any advice(other than paying someone else to do the job)?

Note: I think I read the stuff about removing the airbox here in previously recommended threads, please do not take offense, I gleaned most of this from many sources, and I have posted this in two other forums as I'm a beginner to wrenching on my own bike and am looking for every bit of advice I can get.

~O~
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I just realized this is in the wrong section(sorry). If a MOD could please move it to the technical section I'd appreciate it.

~O~
 

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I replaced both my cables about a month ago when I rebuilt my carbs. Both cables do NOT go to the carb. The "B" cable goes to a box under the left fairing pocket. From there, a short cable goes to the carb. At least that is how it is on my 2000A.

BTW, I didn't think the air box was a big deal to remove / replace.
 

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The frustration of changing the cables with the air box in place will be a lot more than just pulling the box.
 

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As for routing the cables I tape the lower end of the new cable to the upper end of the old cable and pull them through. That way you only have to do it once and being of the same diameter and flexibility the new cable follows along with no problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

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Well, there ya go, Omega Man!

One of the handiest tools I have for working on my bikes is a 14" long "hemostat", originally the thing they clamp arteries and veins with. Really handy for grabbing cable ends, hoses and clamps to hook to the air box, etc. In the old days it made quite a roach clip, too!:ROFL:


 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, there ya go, Omega Man!

One of the handiest tools I have for working on my bikes is a 14" long "hemostat", originally the thing they clamp arteries and veins with. Really handy for grabbing cable ends, hoses and clamps to hook to the air box, etc. In the old days it made quite a roach clip, too!:ROFL:


I happen to have a pair of the short tipped variety. :ssshh:

~O~
 

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YA, be aware that it's not a throttle cable to the carbs! It's to the thingy on frame in behind the left inner fairing for the main throttle cable, and a then a short one to the carbs and another to the cruise control. So that thingy in behind left inner fairing has 3 cables, only 1 goes to the throttle!
At least that is how my 88 was.

Also the cable for the 88 is for 88, 89 for 89, I think anything 90 and newer was the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
YA, be aware that it's not a throttle cable to the carbs! It's to the thingy on frame in behind the left inner fairing for the main throttle cable, and a then a short one to the carbs and another to the cruise control. So that thingy in behind left inner fairing has 3 cables, only 1 goes to the throttle!
At least that is how my 88 was.

Also the cable for the 88 is for 88, 89 for 89, I think anything 90 and newer was the same.
Is that shorter cable from the cruise control box known to fail?

~O~
 

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You might want to get your self a service manual for your bikes year. I have a 2000A. My cable layout is, "A" cable goes directly to the carb. "B" cable goes to the box under the left fairing pocket. From there, a short cable goes to the carb. The cable for the cruise control runs from the Actuator to the carb.
 

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