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Just Winging It
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Thank you so much for your question. I truly did not understand about the clutch-slipping thing. It works! My slow-speed confidence level just went up two points.
Pull your foot peg up.

You'll see there are feelers so you know when you reach the edge of the lean limits.

That's what made the grinding sound in the first video.
 

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With all the skill patterns out there that you can do, most are comprised, in my opinion, of three maneuvers - the u-turn, figure 8 and circles. If you can get a u-turn to between 17 and 20 feet consistently (two parking spaces) and feel comfortable you can apply your technique from this to achieving the same with figure 8s and circles. Once you get comfortable with these three skill patterns, try doing these patterns with the handle bars at the full lock position (bit disconcerting). You will find the bike turn within an even smaller radius. Once you get to this point, the next step is to let the bike lean over with the bars at full lock, looking where you want to go and possibly hearing the pegs scrape, and having total control of the bike. Not there yet, but working towards it - may not get there but have a goal to shoot for. Only scraped my foot peg(s) of my 1800 once during the accident avoidance drill on the course last year. Looked at what I had to do to achieve this and if I had thought about it, probably would not have done it.

When practicing on these big bikes, if it starts to go, let it. If you get to this point, there is no way to stop it, and if you try, you may very well hurt yourself. I have tried and caught my foot under the rear guards on my 1800. Hurts and I was lucky that was all. I did wrestle with my 1800 once in a parking lot. I was damned if it was going down. Won the battle but lost the war. I was sore and stiff for a good 4 weeks - think I pulled just about every muscle in my shoulder area.

I like the CHP training u-tube video. The instructors on my advanced course here in Sidney were local bike cops, but had gone on the CHP course and passed it. It was amazing what they could do to a bike even if it wasn't theirs.

I find it to be a nice feeling when you pull into a parking lot and can maneuver your bike in small, tight spaces and look like you've been doing it all your life.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #43
JeffMayfield - Thanks for the info on the ticklers! I couldn't figure out what those were for. Figured maybe some kind of vent...
 

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Not only does buddy serve as a great camera platform = they are there to help lift if needed!

Be sure to youtube the vids of How to lift a Goldwing
there is one with a 5 foot tall girl doing it!

With 2 people its much easier... 1 healthy person with good back, or two average people.
For noobs- the crash bars are designed to roll to a certain angle and stop- while fully protecting the bags, plastics and passenger
I am guessing that pre-1500 models all incorporate Hondas thinking on those??
The angle it stops is one easiest to right the bike from~

Tip- the coach from a performance riding school has a motto:
Stop looking at where you are going to crash, tighten your knees against the tank and LEAN MORE!!
 

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I didn't read all the pages of the thread, but has anyone recommended counter-leaning while on the bike for U-Turns?

It's quite useful.

If you lean contrary to the turn, the bike leans further in the direction of the intended turn and tightens the circle effortlessly.
 

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Counter balance on a bike is useful, it takes time and distance to achieve. If you are in tight quarters, you may not have the time or distance to move to counter balance. The last course I was on, we were told that it is more the upper body position in relation to the bike- keep the upper body relatively straight and let the bike lean under you, and keep your butt planted in the same position while hugging the tank with your knees as has been mentioned. The more you lean the bike over doing a slow speed maneuver, the more you keep your upper body upright (and quiet). If you look at most police riding videos, there is very little if any shifting of weight while they are doing the skill patterns.

A straight arm policy is also advocated. The arm that is opposite the turn (right turn - straight left arm/left turn - straight right arm). This causes the rider to have to position the body more to the outside of the turn because you are reaching for the windshield with your straight arm - hence the counter balance needed to ensure you do not lean with the bike. You are also making room for the other arm to bring the bar into your side. I find it hard to bring the bar to the full lock position otherwise.

There is a skill pattern that is used at the Wing Dings - it is to do a 135 degree turn from full stop within 9 to 12 feet. The only way to do this is to turn the wheel and lean the bike over, and go. If you have to move to counterbalance by moving once you start, you cannot do this skill pattern.

This is how I practice and do courses. It works for me, but I'm still working on it. If you find something that works for you, take it and run with it. I always found that not everything on a course fits or suits my riding style, but I always come away from a course with more than I went into it with.

The best part of the courses I've been on has always been the people. The comaraderie, and pride that each of us has in our bike(s) sure stands out during the course.

Cheers
 

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A very informative tread. Cant wait for the weekend to try out the techniques described.. I have been slipping the clutch, but have also being varying the revs and found it hard to control the revs. It never occurred to me to fix the revs at a constant and completely control things with the clutch..

Thanks for the lesson
 

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Oh - THAT guy...
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If nobody saw it, it didn't happen!0:)

Rayjoe
I wish!

The second time, when my foot slipped off the centerstand? It toppled in to my supervisors KTM bike, which then fell over and creased, big time, my other supervisors Honda Pilot...

That was a great day. They laughed. Well, all but the Pilot owner.
 
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