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You may have no more problems starting your bike and that will be wonderful. The starter can be removed and repaired as stated previously. IF the starter clutch slips again , before removing the engine try the SeaFoam cleaning method mentioned in post #11.
With my 1100, I found cold weather starts with engine cold when the starter clutch might slip.
 

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Official "Cheeky Plonker"
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Just to return for a moment to the whirring and clunk part of this tread, my engine has done that periodically for the 15 years I've been riding it.

It's not terminal!
 

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Official "Cheeky Plonker"
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Y'know what? you could be right there, it hasn't done it in the last few years and that might be since I switched to the Delo 400.
 

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You don't have to pull the engine to remove or install the starter. To get at the starter clutch/sprang you do. Two different things.
 

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I think we have all made driving "errors in judgement" in our years of riding time. And the fact that we are on this forum to talk about it means SOMEONE is watching over all of us! The ones who are NOT here are ones who were not so lucky. I remember very well a time I went into a turn, And I knew this road, far too fast and even though I did everything right the bike laid down. (Well, everything except trying the turn at 90 MPH!) The old Harleys had those squared off tires so when you laid it into a turn you were on a pencil line size tire patch. I was lucky that the bike went down and out in front of me and I took out 50 feet of picket fence and a couple hedges. The bike was in front and took out the fence and bushes and I was just along for the ride. I actually rode the bike home with not much more damage than a broken front brake lever and a bent shifter (right hand shift on the 66 Harley) and a few scratches on the exhaust. And to add to the luck the homeowner told me to not worry and the fence and bushes, He hated them anyway and I saved him the trouble of removing them. He was just glad I was Ok.:smile2::smile2::smile2:

I have just gotten back into riding after many year away from it and I find I am not as confident as I used to be. Maybe that is I am not as Overconfident as I used to be?
 

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On the 1100 and 1200 Hondas at least, the starter can be removed, cleaned and repaired fairly easily without removing the engine. (I've done it on my 1200.) I just didn't know where the starter clutch was, for which you gave me the bad news. I'll wait for it happen again before I do anything about it. And thanks for the post. I appreciate your help.
I was going by what the manual said. The 86 and 87 1200 has a chain guide and the starter can be removed without pulling the motor. But I can see how leaning the bike could keep the sprocket in reach

Sent from my SM-J320V using Tapatalk
 

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Dont know a lot about starters but in two occasions my son followed me on my Suzuki and went stright where I was making a left. It was a rural road in both occasions and no harm was done to my son or bike. Since then he is a much better rider.
Motorcycle riding require special attention and mind preparedness.
You can not ride for months and the go straight for the twisties.
In the days I work hard on building the house when Im tired I always take the car to Home Depot instead of motorcycle.
Doing curve after curve require a bit of warm up at slower speeds
 

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Dont know a lot about starters but in two occasions my son followed me on my Suzuki and went stright where I was making a left. It was a rural road in both occasions and no harm was done to my son or bike. Since then he is a much better rider.
Motorcycle riding require special attention and mind preparedness.
You can not ride for months and the go straight for the twisties.
In the days I work hard on building the house when Im tired I always take the car to Home Depot instead of motorcycle.
Doing curve after curve require a bit of warm up at slower speeds



Peter,
when I was working for a habit, and riding my 1500 everyday, things were done by muscle memory.


now, being retired and 20 years older, and letting 3 to 4 months or more slide by between rides, things don't happen as easily. I really have to push hard to keep the concentration where it belongs.
 
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