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I have not yet measured the required thickness but I think I still have enough meat there to do this. Any advice before proceeding? 
 

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I read somewhere (maybe here) that motorcycle rotors are a different metal composition than cars, and need to be ground down rather than turned down.
I'm not real sure about this. You might want to do a search and check. I don't know what happens if they are turned.
 

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I wish I had one of the old "lapping" blocks we used to use on valve discs for large system valves in Navy ships.

I would rather do that than try turning one down, that way it would not warp from heat and would be perfectly flat 360 deg all the way around!
 

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sanfelice wrote:
I have not yet measured the required thickness but I think I still have enough meat there to do this. Any advice before proceeding?
Sanfelice, why are you turning your rotors? If just for cosmetic reasons then DON'T turn them. If for a warpage problem or thickness variation then possibly a very light cut. If turning for wear lines or slight scores just leave then as the new pads will soon conform & work properly.

Most bike rotors are very thin to begin with & don't leave much to work with.

One thing you have to watch for is turning the rotors sothin that they will let a worn brake pad allow a caliper piston to travel out of the caliper far enough to leak or **** & jam up. Also thinner rotors will re-warp easily from the heat generated from a couple of hard stops.

Twisty
 

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Honda does not recommend turning or cutting the disc rotors... It's much safer to just replace them when worn or warped..

Twisty is also correct in that the pistons will exceed their safe limits of travel inside the cliper if the pads wear and the rotor is too thin.. That would be a major disaster..
 

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several years ago I had a pulsing front rotor on my '78. I knew a shop that gound them down and had it down (within specs). It has worked great since. As I understand it, the rotors do not "turn" correctly and end up worse, which is probably why honda recommends againt it.
 

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Yes, I have heard the same thing about Honda rotors. In fact, I used to have a Prelude on which Honda recommended against having the rotors turned, but I did it anyway. It was one of the best things I could have done. they probably recommend against this for all vehicles - sells more rotors :baffled:

rcmatt007 wrote:
several years ago I had a pulsing front rotor on my '78. I knew a shop that gound them down and had it down (within specs). It has worked great since. As I understand it, the rotors do not "turn" correctly and end up worse, which is probably why honda recommends againt it.
 

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I don't think it's worth it to grind the rotors. I don't know if it softens the metal surface or the things are surface hardened, but every turned down disk I've ever had on a car or truck didn't last long before it warped again. As Twisty said grooves aren't really a problem. If there's a noticeable lip on the rotor edge it's probably getting close to replacement. Rear disks come up often for the 1500s since there's still a bunch of them being triked. I got a good used rear disk for my bike that way.
 
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