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After viewing RLAP the Fifth DVDa couple of times I'm still not exactly sure I learned anything that hasn't been part of my repertoire for the last 44 years, but it offered some refreshers.



First the easy part: The author (Motorman Palladin) states in his opening comments that if you've viewed RLAP 1, 2,3, or 4, there's really nothing new in version 5. So if that's your situation, you can put your wallet away and save the $34.95 he's asking for the latest issue.:)



In looking and listening, I didn't see anything that hasn't been an accepted tenet in low speed (or high speed) motorcycle operation dating back to the invention of 2 wheelers. Having said that, the RLAP presentation provides the re-packaged information in an entertaining form, and the demonstrations of low speed/big bike handling through a variety of fairly intimidating obstacle courses are certainly impressive and confidence inspiring. There's a bit of an element of campy showmanship of course, but that's to be expected from a troupe that puts on motorcycle shows and teaches the RLAP training seminars 365 days a year. If we all put in those kinds of hours at practice we'd be able to make a DVD too.



I did find the presentation a little slow and frequently found myself thinking "OK, OK, I got it the first time you explained it, now skip on down!" But of course the DVD is pitched to a generic audienceand illuminating a technique from several different angles is an accepted teaching practice, so my impatience is just due to me being a curmudgeon:(; I often have the same problem with the way MSF publications present their information.

In my opinion the DVD could have been shorter, ending after the presentation/demonstration of the 8 excercise/courses. The section dealing with the Motor Officer Course simply went over much of the same technique, differing only in the layout of the obstacle course (tighter tolerances).

I also felt thatone of the more important cautions wasn't properly emphasized. At the end of the 8 excercise presentation the instructor noted casually in passing that you should cool the clutch and rear brake "every 5 minutes or so" especially in hot weather. Given the extensive demonstrations of riding the rear brake and slipping the clutch during the obstacle courses, I think that caution should have been presented at the beginning of the exercises and reinforced midway through. Because of the way the DVD is edited, the viewer doesn't see any of the students or demonstration riders cooling down their bikes during the exercises and it isn't emphasized in the written practice instructions that accompany the DVD.

My last nitpick is admittedly petty and mean spirited.:X In the opening credits the DVD shows that Palladin and his Ride Like A Pro team are sponsored by Harley-Davidson; the RLAP team uses Electra Glides. No big deal; the EG is comparable in weight and slow speed handling to Goldwings.What frosted me a bit is during the all too brief views of the students and the accompanying off screen analysis commentary, the camera seemed to focus on the poor guys and their GL1800's having troubles with the obstacle courses (including a GW dump). There are a few sequences of non-GW riders having problems, but the principal focus is on Wing riders' difficulties. The fact that the ending summary shows an 1800 (Red, too...:dude:) successfully navigating the course doesn't wholly dispel the tacit negative message.

Having said all that, if you've never seen the demo's or haven't ever gotten used to slipping a clutch and using the rear brake to stabilize your bike, this is a decent presentation and may inspire you to do great things at low speed (U-turns, figure 8's, cone weaves, etc) with confidence.:cool:

Or not...:cheeky1:

IMHO $19.95 would be a more realistic price for the offering, so if you want to add this sort of thing to your personal MC library, see if you can find an "obsolete" version (RLAP 1 through 4)


My .02
 

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Fenry, Have you ever watched Jerry perform in person??

I have watched his performance (in person) several times over the past five years. He is very interesting to talk with in person.
 

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DBohrer wrote:
Fenry, Have you ever watched Jerry perform in person??

I have watched his performance (in person) several times over the past five years. He is very interesting to talk with in person.
I wouldn't doubt it a bit.

Nothing in my write-up was intended to demean his achievements or diminish his skills or that of his team. I will state unequivocally that any one of them could run circles :) around me, and having been an LEO for 11 years, I possess a certain empathy for LEO's in general, so I intended no damage to Mr. Palladino.

I caved in and bought the DVD because across all the mc forums to which I've either belonged or contributed, there is a universal recommendation that "RLAP is a MUST have" (kinda like the "must change the timing belts" crowd here:)).

Having seen it and digested its content, I can say that it's good subject matter, well presented. Will you be permanently scarred and deprived if you DON'T see it? Doubtful. Would I join the "you GOTTA see it" crowd? Not really. As I mentioned, if you're unfamiliar with slipping the clutch and using rear braking during slow speed maneuvering, then RLAP is definitely your cup of tea. If you possess proficiency in those techniques, then you'll take away an appreciation for the skill level of the riding team. Nothing more; nothing less.

My .04;)
 

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I to possess an empathy for LEO's as I am in a family of LEO's. State and county levels. One of my nephews rides a Harley Davidson.

I learned use of the clutch friction zone and rear braking for tight U-turns and slow speed maneuvers many years ago.

My first ride was a 1949 Indian, hand shift, foot clutch, manual spark advance and crank start. Started riding that bike while in high school.

It was a lot of fun dragging parts on curvy roads with that 'ole Indian. The Indian's were actually faster than the Harley Davidson's. Don't ask how I know....!

The bikes we have today are a piece of cake to ride compared to bikes like the '49 Indian. Glad I had the opportunity to ride it several years.

Bikes were kinda rare where I grew up and I had lots of requests from school friends for a ride. Girls usually got priority.

Last weekend the Florida Professional Drill Team gave a great performance using four Harley Davidson's and four Gold Wing's at the Mountainman Rally in West Virginia.

Appreciate your response.........Dave
 

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Ditto on RLAP V. Wastes to much time and his jokes aren't very funny.
 

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Is it my imagination, or do most training courses concentrate on "slow, tight manuevers"? What I want is a course that will keep me alive at speed. It's embarrassing, true, to drop your bike in a parking lot..... but it's often deadly to drop your bike or collide with something at 60 plus miles per hour.......

I am a self-taught rider (except for the ERC) and learned many of my skills through the "hard knock school of riding", although I've only had one serious accident (a largely unavoidable deer strike), in forty years..... While I probably harbor a ton of bad habits, I can get by in the parking lot; it's the winding, free-flowing highways that I am concerned about.

I've heard that the Brit licensing and training systems are much, much better than ours, and include a lot of "on-the-road" training with an instructor following behind with a radio. Does anyone know of a training program in the states with this kind of approach? With an emphasis on "at speed" training?
 
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