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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just a reminder to be extra alert this riding season. there are even more brain dead cagers on the road this year than there were last. while out stretching my 82's legs sunday, the inevitable car pulled out of the driveway without looking and i was forced to lay my bike down. luckily, i only received a few cuts and bruises as did my bike as this all happened at less than 30mph but be alert this riding season and happy trails to all.
 

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Glad you're OK with only a few scratches! I had two close calls a week ago Saturday (both on the same day) and both were because of inattentive cagers. Be safe and alert every one!
 

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Glad you are OK.
 

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The beginning of the riding season is always the worst, as they haven't see a motorcycle for months now.....
 

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My bike is big and red like a fire truck and I had someone trying to change lanes into me over the weekend. I guess I need to get one of those sirens too!

Glad you're ok.
 

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Motorcycles are common around here all year, the combination cage drivers/cell phone operators still don't see them. Seems like every time I go out on the bike I have a near miss or two. Never actually went down though. When this kind of thing happens on a daily basis, you learn to expect it, look for it, and be prepared to deal with it. I can usually spot somebody about to do something stupid from far enough back to have time to avoid it. They sometimes surprise me and DON'T do something stupid, but that is the exception, not the rule. Always better to be prepared.
 

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Happens all the time and I am glad you are not hurt.

However I hate to hear the phrase "I had to lay the bike down". Truth is tires, steering, and brakes give you the option of stopping or swerving to avoid a collision, Plus you are relatively well protected when still on the bike. A dropped and sliding bike is a bike that is out of control and will slide much much further than a bike that is still upon it's tires, plus you have given up any chance of control over steering, braking, or acceleration, and you are also now sliding down the road yourself with nothing to protect you but your helmet and jacket ect, which will now also need replacing.

Obviously I was not there and cannot judge your actions when confronted with a brain dead and blind cage driver, but please look into some advanced rider training like the MSF Experienced Rider Course.
 

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Glad it wasn't worse, even at 30mph real bad things can happen.
 

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I agree about laying thebike down nt the best idea but not being there I cannot critisize (spelling?) I have had to do several emergency stops and keeping the rubber side down works.Full control and controled braking is the way to go,But whatever works as long as you are OK.
 

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The beginning of the riding season is always the worst, as they haven't see a motorcycle for months now.....
change "motorcycle" for snow, leaves, girl in shorts, school kid, deer, heavy rain, and you pretty much have the mentality of 80% of anyone who found a set of keys this morning.
Rode 2 hours in a pouring rain sunday back to Ohio, 2-3 times I had someone on my tail 70MPH...mind you helmet is bright yellow, and my suit is lime green.
I swear I'm going to ride this year with my brights on, and flashers on, all day, all night

glad the OP is more or less ok
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks to all for your kind words and thoughts. yes it could have been much worse and i consider myself lucky. i just wanted to remind everyone at the start of the riding season to be aware and extra alert. things happen quickly.
 

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just a reminder to be extra alert this riding season. there are even more brain dead cagers on the road this year than there were last. while out stretching my 82's legs sunday, the inevitable car pulled out of the driveway without looking and i was forced to lay my bike down. luckily, i only received a few cuts and bruises as did my bike as this all happened at less than 30mph but be alert this riding season and happy trails to all.
You know, bikes stop better on their tires than they do sliding on their side.

In other words, you panicked and lost control.
 

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Glad you're not hurt! As for your course of action I can't say as I wasn't there. The only one who could evaluate the situation and act was you and since you weren't seriousy hurt it must have been the right response.
 

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...... and since you weren't seriousy hurt it must have been the right response.

Honestly? You're going with that?

I'm filing that under faulty logic.
 

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You know, bikes stop better on their tires than they do sliding on their side.

In other words, you panicked and lost control.
Really? Where you there to witness the event? Or are you such a know-it-all that you know the PREFECT response for EVERY situation? How do you know that there wasn't parked cars to the right & oncoming cars to the left?

Yes, Bikes do stop better on their tires then on the side. I know that from my motorcycle safety class that from 20 mph, I can stop in 20 feet. I have not tried that from 30 mph. But don't criticize somebody if you didn't see what happen.
 

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If one misjudges and ends up high siding it's very much likely to cause more damage to bike and rider. I guess all of us just aren't up to rgbeard's skill level, probably too late for me to catch up at my age. So yes, to me the end result is what counts.
 

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If one misjudges and ends up high siding it's very much likely to cause more damage to bike and rider. I guess all of us just aren't up to rgbeard's skill level, probably too late for me to catch up at my age. So yes, to me the end result is what counts.
I parallel it like this:

A) Ride well and do a proper panic stop - no one hurt at all
B) lose the bike and slide it - minor hurt.
C) High side it and really mess up good - Ambulance ride.

You're saying his outcome of B makes it the best choice?

I think I'll go turn on the stove, and cause minor burns on my hand. Since I'm not majorly hurt, was it the best outcome for my time from 4:28 to 4:35 PM? Or was the better choice to leave the stove alone?

This is all a long a protracted way of saying: I don't believe anyone at anytime when they utter the phrase: "I had to lay it down." That's simply someone in an embarrased way saying: "Yeah.... I, uhhh, meant to do that... yeah...."

Back to - he panicked and lost control... but, oh yeah... he meant to do that.
 

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If one misjudges and ends up high siding it's very much likely to cause more damage to bike and rider. I guess all of us just aren't up to rgbeard's skill level, probably too late for me to catch up at my age. So yes, to me the end result is what counts.
So about that skill level - how exactly do you "lay the bike down" intentionally? Did he choose which side to crash on? They never taught me how to crash my bike in any of the training courses I've been to. Or how to high side while braking in a straight line, for that matter.

Do you practice crashing and highsiding your bike, so you are ready to do it in an emergency situation? Got pics?

KeS
 

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When one of you experts get in an accident please be sure to have a camera to record your superb skills so those less adept riders can benefit from your abilities.
 
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