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Since this is the biggest bike ever for me I've started questioning my abiliy to get my wife on. I still seem to have some problems at times when stopping and taking off with a right or left hand turn..especially if uphill. Any sage advice about putting the boss on the back. I know, practice, practice...but what else should I do? I don't want to get us hurt.

If this has been covered before excuse me. I'm kinda new here.
 

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One of the great things about riding a wing is that they are so heavy that a lady on the back doesn't seem to make much difference.

My wife is a good passenger and good passengers really do make the difference, apart from the odd whack between the shoulder blades when I'm going fast and the urge she has to converse I'd never know she was there.

However what makes that so is she knows how to be a good passenger. When we first started riding together I simply told her to look over my shoulder as we go around corners and just go with the bike. This she does and she doesn't cause any unfavourable movement, even when the pegs are scraping.

Andrew
 

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She has been my passenger for many a mile on smaller bikes. My other one is an old CB550, but this one is sooooo much heaver it has me concerned. She knows to sit still, etc. but the getting moving again at slow speeds worrie's me. Besides, we have the intercom's now and she will really be able to tell me how to do stuff!!
 

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F.A. I would suggest you just go out by yourself for a bit moreand test yourself on the difficult areas you mentioned. Get your confidence up because your are right it is a big bike when it is stopped or nearly stopped. Get use to it solo, then you will be all right. Be careful at stop signs and lights when your feet are resting on those painted lines, they can be slippery with a little sand on them and when you park the beast I always put it in gear before I dismount and this will prevent any tendancies for the bike to roll forward if gravity coax`s your bike forward and the side stand folds to the up position, leaving you there trying tohold the wing up and farts are a flying in your riding pants. Find a nice quiet spot witha upgrade. Take your time, you`ll be cool.
 

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Good advice JJ. That's pretty much what I've decided. I have no real problem alone but just don't feel ready to take on a passenger. At least my feet touch the ground. I have a friend that just bought a new 1800 and he has to tipy toe to touch the ground, but he's only about 5'3". Quite a sight :action::action:.
 

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Practice, practice, practice... I rode my 1200 (been off bikes for 25yrs) for six months before I put the woman who hangs around here on the back. Don't take anyone with you until you are comfortable with the bike. I did a lot of parking lot practice. That woman and I are not small people, between the two of us we weigh more than half the Goldwing does. That woman wasn't a natural passenger so I had more on my hands than expected at first. It comes with a little practice though.

That woman and I rode up to Paradise on Mt. Rainier today (damn hot for here, 90F).It was a nice ride, about 70 miles each way. Paradise is located on the SW flank of the mountain at 5400' elevation, so it's a gain of over 5000' for us. Interestingly with the hot weather the bike remained cool, about 1/4-1/3 of the temp gauge scale, but got hot enough to bring the fans on while idling for about five minutes at the park gate.
 

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I wouldn't put a passanger on if you don't feel ready by your self, just keep riding by your self and soon it'll be second habit, Then try taking her on short rides until your ready, If your not sure about a passanger, then your not ready, get use to the bike first.
 

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Good advice all. Exavid, you should bring "that woman" over to Sequim some day. It was hot here as well but mid 80s. All the weekend warriors are over here for the holidays, so we're saying put.
 
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Hey fatalattraction :waving:It takes a little time to get used to the weight of this brute, so just take your time and ride alone for now. :clapper:If there are any empty car parks near your place :jumper:this is a good spot to practice right and left hand turns with your wife on behind you. :weightlifter:Just take it easy untill you get it right. :clapper:Good luck and many safe (s)miles. :skipping:

:walker::18red::walker:
 
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fatalattraction wrote:
I have a friend that just bought a new 1800 and he has to tipy toe to touch the ground, but he's only about 5'3". Quite a sight :action::action:.
Hey fatalattraction :waving:please tell your friend to make sure he has the rear suspension set at the default settings (0)on his :18red:He can check his settings by pressing the memory button on the left panel. :clapper:

:weightlifter::18red::weightlifter:
 

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I wouldn't put my wife on my wing until I felt that I was capable of being control at all times. Fortunately, she didn't bug me as she understood that the wing is the biggest, best bike I've ever had.She is an excellent rider and sits still and doesn't try to help me drive:clapper:.

It took me about a month until I was completely satisfied with my performance. The last bike I owned was a 750 Yamaha some twenty two years ago.Stopping gracefully has been my biggest challenge. I laugh about our occasional "controlled crash" when coming to a stop. I don't get tippy but I bang my shins on the crash bars once in a while. Other than that, we love to ride together. We went on a 250 mile ride last Tuesday. The weather was excellent: 75 deg temps, fluffy clouds on a beautiful blue sky with little wind. It truly doesn't get much better than that.

But, don't rush in to anything. Take you time now and you'll appreciate it later.

Regards,

Hobie
 

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Take your time, as far as a passenger, you have the rest of your life to go on rides with the "Boss" !

Like some one said watch out for the "Painted Lines" especially in "Washington" they get very slippery for tires and feet !

Don't creep around corners give it a little gas, it's easier that way with heavy bikes !

You could throw a 90lb bag of Cement or salt on back, have to use a few Black rubber bungies so the bag doesn't shift, put it long ways so it doesn't break open and spill causing the weight to shift and practice! People will just think you just bought it and are bringing it home !

Besides if you dump a 90lb bag it won't scream at you for a week , lol !
 

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Hmm... I'd need more than one bag.
 

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I was very nervous the first time I had my rider on back. Luckily I started with my 90 lb daughter. She was the only one who wanted to ride. I have since had my wife on back and it feels very comfortable. Just be patient. When you do decide it's time, make sure she knows not to get on or off until your ready. Almost dumped mine one day when my daughter decided to jump off as soon as we stopped.



Billy
 

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I was also off bikes for about 22 years while we raised a couple of
kids. I am amazed that my wife was willing to climb right back on
after I bought my GL1200 Aspy. (She's got more guts than I do!)
What seems to help me in the slow-speed & uphill turns is looking
in the direction I want to go, not at the ground. Might not help
everyone but it works for me!
 

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Yep, looking where you want to go is the key, especially in turns. One thing to avoid like the plague is looking at obstacles you don't want to hit. There are several motorcycle safety sites on the web where you can learn a good bit about proper handling and specific practices you might want to try.

A little over a year ago I bought my first 'Wing after 25+ years away from bikes. I did a lot of reading, books from the library and on the web. Got lots of remedial stuff and several concepts that were new to me.
 
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jwinter75 wrote:
What seems to help me in the slow-speed & uphill turns is looking
in the direction I want to go, not at the ground.
Might not help
everyone but it works for me!
Hey jwinter75 :waving:This statement in red is 100% correct. :clapper:"Focus your eyes where you want to be, Not where you are afraid of Falling". :clapper:I have used that line in my signature on a number of occassions. :jumper:

:walker::18red::walker:
 

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wingdawg101 wrote:
You could throw a 90lb bag of Cement or salt on back, have to use a few Black rubber bungies so the bag doesn't shift, put it long ways so it doesn't break open and spill causing the weight to shift and practice! People will just think you just bought it and are bringing it home !

Besides if you dump a 90lb bag it won't scream at you for a week , lol !

Niow THAT made me laugh. :)

Jack
 
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