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I looked at my initial response and I realize that was not clear, and that my response could have been a little more brotherly. I will do better when add my two cents to a discussion from now on...

Guys, my intention was to stress the importance of developing the necessary skills for control of your motorcycle. First, reading that riders are dropping bikes in low speed situations is an indicator that they are not utilizing the friction zone technique. Friction Zone is a primary element to riding a motorcycle, if you don't master the technique you will constantly drop your bike in low speed situations. Secondly, if you master friction zone and "the dip", it won't matter the size of the rider or the weight of the bike, you will be able to turn safely and with precision. Looking forward, looking up, and looking where you want the bike to go, will enable you to control the bike. A strong man CANNOT manhandle a motorcycle, the weight of the bike and speed will always work against him and win, until you master the physics of riding. I have seen it in person at the Midwest Police Motorcycle Training Program and in the Ride Like A Pro Video Series, women of average height and weight that have mastered the techniques easily controlling large bikes, not by brawn, but by finesse. Thirdly, I made mention of dropping the Road King because that is what I did repeatedly as I learned the techniques and developed my skill set at the Midwest Police program. I was not saying that dropping the bike is what made me a better rider, but rather, I learned the necessary skills so that I would not drop the bike. It was tough. I was bruised and embarrassed, however, at the end of the second day I could see some improvement in my riding. My instructors also reinforced the importance of the the techniques before I left for the day. I continued on with the course for two additional days and I passed. I believe however, that being able to master the techniques on a large bike is what enabled me to go out and buy a goldwing as my first bike. I constantly practice the techniques that I learned in the program. I have not dropped my bike or been in an accident since starting to ride in the summer of 2008.

I believe that we have to maintain a high level of mastery that cager's don't. My intention was not to offend anyone but to stress: training and mastery of the techniques.
 

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brian Yarker wrote:
Well I hate to admit this on here but I keep dropping the wing. Being new to my first wing I have dropped it for the third time, each time I was virtually stationary - once when coming out of a petrol station and someone walked in front of me just as I was turning and the bike dropped, the second time I was stationary at a roundabout with a pillion rider the bike just seemed to fall and the third just starting off and the engine died, each time no harm done or no sign of any marks on the bike. I know it is a heavy bike, my last bike was a V-rod which I thought was a heavy bike but I never dropped that. Everything is fine when moving but just hate stopping and starting now, guess it must be my age. Any advice welcome.

Thanks

Brian
I have had this problem too with my 79 but I am getting better. In my opinion it is not about the weight as much as the weight distribution side to side. Once I get to that magic lean angle at rest or very slow speeds over it goes and there is no stopping it with my 135# frame.
 

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Hi Pawing

Yes not just me I gather but glad I asked for help here as I've tried most of the things people have surgested which has helped a lot especially keeping the bike pointing forward and practice parking,the reverse take a bit of geting used but I'm get better ..

Cheers Brian...
 

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Years ago at mc rallies they would conduct a slow race, a desinated distance was chosen and the rider with the longest elapsed time trophed. Kind of like trials riding, get up on the pegs and practice balance , sit in the saddle and go as slow as you can and practice balance. All yours spills were low speed.Any fool can rip it down the road.
 

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I agree with chas weaver, grabbing the front brake at low speeds and not having the handle bars straight when you stop will tip you over every time, also always turn to the left when making tight turns and breaking in a parking lot so you can put your left foot down and still break with your right foot.
 
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