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Would you consider yourself an aggresive, medium or easy going goldwing rider, and how many miles do you get on a new set of brake pads?
 

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Over 125,000 miles and I have replaced them twice. The last time because they were oil soaked. I have a bit more weight, but then I have good heavy brakes in the rear and they re separated front to rear not in line with (rear and one front disconnected).
 

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I'm a medium to aggressive rider. I also use the brakes for friction zone handling a lot. My bike turned over 26,000 miles last week and the back brakes were at 20-25% left. Front brakes are still around 70%.

John
 

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I am a pretty aggressive rider except I don't brake hard going into corners usually, I'm not racing so I just decel before the turn and brake if I need to. I changed the left front at 30K, it's the one that gets the most use on an 1800, the rest were still real good. I will probably get close to 50K out of the others.
 

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Brakes? You mean to say my 1100 has brakes:11brown: That thing is like trying to stop a freight train with the brakes it has. Time to save for the braided lines.
James
 

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My riding style depends on my moods and who I am riding with. At 42,000 miles I had the brakes replaced, there was still about 20+% left on them but I was going on a 5K mile trip and did not want to hassle with them on the trip.

Like many of you I will use the brakes/clutch/throttle during slow speed turns. In reality I think this is probably a lot less wear than grabbing them hard at 70 to make the offramp you almost just missed.
 

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Hard to tell, the linked brake system changes things some. Even so, I use the throttle and gears more than I use the brakes.
 

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I also shift down to slow down, but in the last MSF class I took they stressed using your brakes instead of shifting down.

The reason they gave was that during an emergency you would not be trying to shift down and concentrating strictly on using your brakes while trying to avoid any collision.

I tow a trailer during my long rides in the summer and I notice the difference in the stopping distance. I'm sure that has quite a bit of effect on my brake wear. I definitely leave more room between me and the traffic ahead with the trailer.
 

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I also shift down to slow down, but in the last MSF class I took they stressed using your brakes instead of shifting down.

The reason they gave was that during an emergency you would not be trying to shift down and concentrating strictly on using your brakes while trying to avoid any collision.

***************************************************************

I have taken several MSF courses over the last 15 years and find it quite interesting how they keep changing what they teach. One year it's this and the next it's that.......!

I use engine braking all the time. It provides much better control and stability especially when running the curvy mountain roads that I frequently ride in West Virginia.

If one practices panic braking periodically as I do, then there should be no problems applying the brakes when the emergency arises.

The key is ride alert, it's a full time job.
 

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I will usually get about 40k out of the fronts, more out of the rears. I usually try to use compression braking as much as possible.

I was instructed in my first MSF course (courtesy of the US Army) that you should always keep the bike in the proper gear for the speed you were traveling. The easiest way to do this is downshifting and using compression braking. Made sense to me at the time and I've always done it that way.
 

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BustedKnuckle wrote:
I will usually get about 40k out of the fronts, more out of the rears. I usually try to use compression braking as much as possible.

I was instructed in my first MSF course (courtesy of the US Army) that you should always keep the bike in the proper gear for the speed you were traveling. The easiest way to do this is downshifting and using compression braking. Made sense to me at the time and I've always done it that way.
+1

Better overall control, and you are in the right gear if full throttle is needed "now".

And, the brakes last ten times as long as never gearing down.
 
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