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Still a winger at heart.
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I know that this is a serious case of preaching to the choir... Most of you probably rode better than me years ago, and have forgotten more than I have learned.

With that said... I have come across a riding tip that works well for me. I though I share it for that one person in a million that might need it.

In my quest to be smoother, more stable, andmore controlled in the twisties... I have found that if I concentrate about 40-50 feet in front of me (rather than closer) I find I am much smoother. I 'spose it due to a wider field of vision and the ability to anticipate sooner.

:banana::11black:
 

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Concentration is a key element to smooth riding, but I also scan from the apex of the curve in front of me to looking at what's in the road not so far away from me. Eyes on a swivel sort to speak. I don't have any trouble maintaining a groove because I see what the curve in front of me is doing, be it getting tighter or looser, and with an frequent glance a little closer to the front of the bike, I can recognize bad road or debris, vehicles, animals, and the such and make what corrections are possible to avoid them and stay in the groove. I love the feeling of tracking through a sharp curve and beeing able to power on in the last part of the curve, zooming out onto the straight-away like a fighter plane. I love the focus that becomes part of the ride.:dance::cooler:

I try to avoid going into an unknown curve "hot". I hate the feeling that I'm going to perhaps run off the road before I can get slowed down.I've never donethat, but I've had my orrifices pucker a couple of times.:jumper::goofygrin:

Keep enjoying the ride Ubarw, cause I know you do.

Man, so do I:byebye::waving:

hobie
 

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It's like trying ride on a painted line. If you look well ahead it's easy to stay on a painted line, try it looking right in front of the bike and it can't be done. Same thing on the road anywhere, gotta keep the eyes way ahead. It might take a little practice in sharper curves, it's hard at first to keep the head up when you're bearing down in a sweep. I'm convinced a lot of accidents where someone crosses the center line is caused by a fixation on the line instead of keeping the eyes well ahead where they want to go.
 

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:shock:but I've had my orrifices pucker a couple of times.:jumper::goofygrin:
Thats the feeling where your stomach knows you are at the line a split second before your brain...

:shock::shock:
 

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You're right Exavid !:clapper:
 

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Hey UbarW. Now if you can just give me a tip how to come to a nice smooth well choreographed stop!! I know, practice, practice, etc. :action:

Actually I do ok most of the time, except when someone I know is around, then it looks like choreographed chaos.
 

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Thats a good one. You asking me for tips on consistently stopping in a graceful manner.

It seems that sometimes I roll up likehollywood star, all style, smile and gile. Then Iforget to put my foot down.

Or, I roll to a smooth stop, looking cool. I look around, surveying how many people noticed my superior skills. Then I kill the bike with extreme prejudice cuz I left it in third.

Yep. All style!:cheeky1:
 

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A graceful stop requires a gentle stop. If I see my fork go down any, it isn't a graceful stop. As she comes to a stop the brakes need to be let off so at the moment of stopping there should be very little if any brake being held, at least on level ground. Brake modulation takes a bit of practice, I got lots of that bringing a 45' coach to a stop without the passengers being able to feel the moment the bus actually stopped. It's not quite as easy with air brakes, they aren't quite as sensitive to pedal pressureas hydraulic. Your foot should hit the ground just the moment the bike stops not before. It's also harder with a passenger on the back, any movement from there will throw you off a bit.
 

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riding tips...

The best I have is

Push right to go right, push left to go left.

According to Don Vesco works from about 15-300 MPH outside of these speeds you need to steer in the direction you intend to go.
 

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Tonys96 wrote:
riding tips...

The best I have is

Push right to go right, push left to go left.

According to Don Vesco works from about 15-300 MPH outside of these speeds you need to steer in the direction you intend to go.
I have had a buddy tell me this, and I am having a hard time getting my head wrapped around it. It seems counterintuitive.

I have tried to try it (does that make sense?)
 

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Think about it, if you've ridden a bicycle you've been doing it. Basically by pushing right to go right you're pulling the wheels of the bike tothe left,out from underyou, initiating a bank to the right. At very low speeds the bike really isn't banking much if at all, then you can turn the fork in the direction you want to go, at this speed the fork is turned to keep the bank from developing a bank.

Remember if you do manage to get yourself in a bind and swinging wide in a curve, push that bar toward the road, you can almost always bank her a little more and save the day. Lean down toward the bank to help the bike by lowering your CG. Never get nervous and lean away from the turn, thatwill automatically cause the bike tobank deeper into the turn. If worst comes toworst I'd rather have it slide out from under me than go wide because I didn't push her down hard enough. On dry clean pavement you can leave a real trail of sparks from the pegs and can feel them start to fold on their hinges long before the bike will let go.

Personally I'm a real whuss these days and don't push things like I did in my well spent youth. The hell with that 'ill spent' stuff it was fun!
 

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Been riding 32 years and just had a reminder on the last group ride I took to Niagara Falls this past May. I was last in the group and had head phones like it should be done legally, in one ear, jamming to the walkman I velcrode to my tank. We all pulled into the gas station, so I pulled into the last pump open, jamming on the song that was on the radio, went to lean the bike over on the kickstand! But I forgot to put the *&^%$%^& Kickstand Down!. Talk about feeling like a Dumb*ss!:doh: Anyway I followed the proceure I saw years ago about picking up a bike by yourself and it worked real well. I will see if I can find it on the web and post it if anyone is interested. Yeah I had it picked up before anyone got to me to help. They all got a good laugh alond with a bunch of folks at work when we all got back!
 

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You can find the butt first shuffle to lift a Wing here on the forum. Do a search, we've nattered about that too of course. I've had the unenviable opportunity to do it more than once. After an unfortunate experience with a piece of asphalt that broke under my side stand I even got to try it with the bike all the way down on its mirror. It worked well and I didn't starve to death in the woods. Didn't do much more than put a couple little scratches on the mirror and mud on the wind wing. Lucky me. Been more lucky if the damn pavement hadn't given way!
 

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Did the same thing with my 87 Harley Electroglide Classic with a nice looking Blonde on the back, after she got off at the gas station, everyone was watching and I forgot the kickstand again. The porbability of messing up is proportional to the people watching you!:bananas:
 

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fatalattraction wrote:
Hey UbarW. Now if you can just give me a tip how to come to a nice smooth well choreographed stop!! I know, practice, practice, etc. :action:

Actually I do ok most of the time, except when someone I know is around, then it looks like choreographed chaos.
Hey Fatal, you and I both, could go in for synchronized ballet stopping. I look like a fish out of water 70% of my stops. It always goes well if there is no one around to witness the event, but wheneverI have an audience, the old stopping fairy visits and my legs flay around wildly as I heave on the bars to keep her upright! Typically, if there is anyone around, being a Wing, they will bound to be looking!!

I am watching the tips avidly, and am trying to re learn the techniques that seemed to come naturally years ago with my other wings. I was beginning to think I was the only one, but it is good to know that there are others with "two left feetitus":goofygrin:

I have been practicing Exavids suggestion on cornering and I find it really helps, and has avoided any brown underwear experiences so far.

I will now try the total stop before planting feet down, just hope the grey matter remembers the feet bit!!:goofygrin:



Pete
 

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My take-off is smooth as glass, when I stop, I almost fall on my..uh..side. The smooth controlled stophas been one of thebiggest challenges for me. As was said, when people(usually HD riders) are watching,sometimes mydismount looks like a controlled crash. And when my lovely wife is on the back, though she's a great rider, it seems that compounds the problem. Higher CG I guess.

I've also found the "back into it" method of picking up the bike is the ONLY way to do it. Not that I've actually ever had to use it.:D

As far as the push rightgo right, I believe that gyroscopic forces are at work there also. If you take a gyroscope and spin it up and push on it's axis, it will exhibit a force 90 deg. to the force pushingit, in the direction of the spin, I believe. I learned this stuff back in '74 when I went to USAF avionics school so my memory might have faded a bit:baffled:

Hope you folks have a good weekend riding. It's going to be 97F.tomorrow and 103F.Sunday:crying:No rain in sight forever. I never thought I'd get really tired of continuous dry and hot weather but I am. Oh well.

Hobie
 

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Yep gyroscopic force really helps things, that's why a bike once up to speed will be stable. When the bike leans, the force (may it be with you) will attempt to turn the fork in the direction of the lean which stands her back up. That's the resistance you feel when pushing on the bar. If it weren't there the bike wouldhave no dynamic stability. When you trike a bike, it's only the fork rake that centers the steering, and that doesn't vary with speed.If I'm visualising it rightI think the lack of lean when turning the fork of a trike adds resistance to turning the bars. You trike guys should be more knowledgeable about that, does the steering effort increase with speed?

Another thought about coming to a suave stop. I often find it helpful just prior to the actual stop to stick my left leg out, not quite touching the ground, but just enough to ensure the bike will lean to the left, the weight of you leg is enough to make sure she will lean that way when stopping. I don't think it's possible to gracefully bring it to a stop and try to put both feet down consistently. I find starting out up hill especially with two up, that holding the bike back with the foot brake rather than using the front brake, gives me finer control of the throttle-clutch coordination. This stuff is pretty obvious but it's what works for me.
 

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This reminds me of a friend who was 5" 1" and rode a 71 honda 750. It must have had a seat height of 34 or 35 inches. He could not come close to touching the ground with both feet. He would decide which foot he would put down and slide over on the seat in that direction. I never saw him drop it but it was a sight to watch
 

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As a "professional driver" we us what is called the "Smith system"

The five keys to safe driving...

HERE is the home page...

I know that is for driving cages but they still work for bikers as well:waving:
 

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DigbyODell wrote:
As a "professional driver" we us what is called the "Smith system"

The five keys to safe driving...

HERE is the home page...

I know that is for driving cages but they still work for bikers as well:waving:
I've been exposed to their videos through one of the companies I drove for, pretty good stuff and it applies to whatever you drive.
 
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