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never rode two up, does the passenger get on first or do I? thanks
 

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Piaggio MP3, was 02 GL1800
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I would ask which they are most comfortable with. Especially if it is a lady.
 

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You get on first. Be in a standing position with a grip on the handle bars beforepassenger gets on or off. If you are not ready the bike will go over. So make sure that you and other rider communicate with each other.
 

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I get on first, stand, legs tight against the bike, front brake applied and then passenger gets on. Let them get settled and then I get settled.
 

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AZgl1500 wrote:
I would ask which they are most comfortable with. Especially if it is a lady.
I agree. My wife has a lot of difficulty getting on the bike with me straddling it. I let her get on with the bike on the side stand.

I was pretty nervous about doing it this way at first due to stress on the stand. After 15 years I have yet to see any damage.
 

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I also have my wife get on first. She has a hard time otherwise (knees). I make sure the bike is on solid ground and I steady the bike also.
 

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Agreed I always allow my lady on first and then take special care not to land a stray boot on her when I get on

( no matter how tempting :D)

MW
 

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I always get on and steady the bike. If I have to I can stand and lean forward to get out of the way of the passenger mount. I also like to pull in the front brake.
 

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SETHAN12 wrote:
You get on first. Be in a standing position with a grip on the handle bars beforepassenger gets on or off. If you are not ready the bike will go over. So make sure that you and other rider communicate with each other.
that is how I do it as well, or did.... Beth has been driving her own bike for years
 

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I stand well forward over the front part of the tank (back part-whatever) have her step on the passenger peg/floorboard -just like getting on a horse.
 

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Wife gets on first because she can't get on afterI do.:D I just leave the bike on the side stand in a safe position or hold the front brake.:) I have seen a mechanic pick a bike up off the ground by leaning it over on the sidestand :?soI don't worry about the side stand breaking.:cool:
 

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also make sure that your air ride is up a little higher then normal. less bottoming out that way.
 

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laugh
This is a good question. You will always get both answers on it too. Now if I have a skinny little bikini model for a passenger I get on first (so I can grab a hand full:) If my wife is the passenger then she always mounts first. My wife is a LARGE woman and I'm slightly over 135 lbs so that is the only way we can do it. I also carry an air pump for the suspension as I need to max the rears when she rides with. I normally run 38-42 solo and 46-48 if I'm pulling my trailer solo. It's a really a matter of what you and the passenger find most comfortable with.
 

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I get on first and when I take off I look in the mirror to see if she's running behind me in which case I stop and give her another chance.:cooldevil: [sup]




It's okay she's in Hawaii this week with my younger daughter. She won't see this.;)[/sup]
 

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driver first, then put the bike straight up but keep side stand down for safety only, the passenger gets on from the left side as the rider. hold the bike straight while leaning forward if needed to give passenger more room to get on.
 

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Kinda like asking which comes first the chicken or the egg. There is no right or wrong way, Whatever works for the 2 of you. Mine has her own bike now so I don't have to worry about it.....
 

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Hidepounder wrote:
Kinda like asking which comes first the chicken or the egg. There is no right or wrong way, Whatever works for the 2 of you. Mine has her own bike now so I don't have to worry about it.....
I agree 100%. It is something the rider and co-rider needs to work out between them. Many times there are co-riders with physical problems that may prevent them from getting on last. I have seen this on many occasions.

It can be just as safe getting on either way........regardless of what some may think.
 

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I shamelessly cut & pasted this from another forum. If you are taking a passenger for the first time, this is important information.



You might also get a litle insruction yourself, if you haven't had a co-rider before.. If you are near NH, I'd be glad to help, of I'm sure there are others nearby who would offer some time & advice..



Anyway, these tips are excellent, and you should share them with your co-rider.







Number 9 is the main point.

TIPS FOR THE MOTORCYCLE PASSENGER
(Or How To Get Invited To Go Riding Again)

By Chuck Hawks


Riding on a motorcycle with a friend is one of the most fun things you can do. It can be an even more enjoyable experience if the passenger understands and follows a few simple rules. To be the kind of passenger riders want to ride with, remember the following:

1. Wear clothing that will give you some protection in the unlikely event of a spill. As a minimum, you should wear the following to protect yourself:

Footwear that protects your feet and your ankles (hiking boots are good).
Durable pants--leather is best; lacking leather, you will have to make do with jeans, work pants, or something similar.
An abrasion resistant jacket that zips or buttons up close to the neck (again, leather is best if you have it; a nylon flight jacket or parka are satisfactory, and a Levis-type jacket will do in a pinch).
Durable gloves.
Eye protection--ideally, the helmet you borrow or own should have a face shield for comfort as well as protection. If it does not, goggles are good, and glasses (dark or prescription) will do.
2. You should also attempt to dress appropriately for the weather. If you have not ridden very much, you probably do not realize how hot or how cold it can be on a motorcycle. If it is hot, it will feel a lot hotter while you are riding; if it is cold, it will feel a lot colder while you are riding. Ask the rider for advice about dressing for the anticipated conditions, but don't compromise your minimum level of protection as described above.

On hot sunny days, one trick is to wear an extra large white shirt over your jacket. It will reflect a lot of heat and help keep you cool. In general, it is easier to dress safely and comfortably for a cool day than for a hot one. Lastly, don't wear anything loose and floppy (like a long scarf or bell bottom pants) that could get caught in the rear wheel, sprockets, drive chain or belt, or any other moving part of the motorcycle. You could injure yourself, and might cause an accident.

3. Wear a securely fastened helmet that fits properly. Most riders have extra helmets and will be glad to loan you one. A helmet should be a snug fit; it should not be possible to twist it around on your head. The strap should be pulled as tight as you can get it. You can test for fit, and to see if the strap is tight, like this: grasp the chinbar of a full coverage helmet, or the edge of an open face helmet directly over your forehead, and try to pull the helmet backwards off your head. If the helmet winds up on the back of your head, tighten the strap or get a helmet that fits.

The rider can show you how to put on your helmet properly and easily (you kind of roll it onto your head from the front). If you ride often, you will eventually want to buy your own helmet. Just about any motorcycle shop can help you pick out a suitable helmet that fits you correctly.

4. Before you attempt to mount the motorcycle, make sure that the passenger footpegs are down. (They fold up when not in use, and it is easy for the rider to forget to put them down for you.) If you don't know where the footpegs are, have the rider point them out to you.

Also, beware of the hot exhaust pipes. Make sure you know where they are, and don't let your leg or any part of your body touch them as you mount or dismount the motorcycle. They can give you a severe burn right through the heaviest pants.

5. It is customary to get on or off the motorcycle from the left side. Always wait for the rider to tell you it's okay to mount or dismount. If you start to clamber on (or off) when the rider does not expect it, the sudden motion of the motorcycle will be disconcerting. You could even pull the motorcycle over, a big no-no.

6. Here is the best way to get on a motorcycle, and the method almost all passengers should use: extend your right leg over the seat, and then slide gently up onto the seat. Put your feet on the footpegs and you are onboard!

If you are not able to do that because you are a tiny person or a child, this will work: put your left foot on the left passenger foot peg, lean your body way over the motorcycle, and gently step up until you can swing your right leg over the seat and ease yourself down. You must keep your body low and lean over the motorcycle as much as possible while you get on, to help the rider keep the motorcycle balanced. The weight of your body, if it is too far out of line with the weight of the motorcycle, could pull the bike over, still a big no-no.

A person reasonably close to normal size (male or female) should not need to use this method to mount a motorcycle, and a heavy person should not attempt it under any circunstances. It is all a question of balance; the rider is not strong enough to force a big motorcycle to stay upright if you cause it to get out of balance.

To dismount, just reverse the process you used to get on. With a little practice, getting on and off will become second nature.

7. Once you are on the motorcycle, plant your feet on the passenger footpegs and keep them there. You absolutely do not want to bring your foot into contact with the rear wheel, drive chain or belt, or the hot muffler. Never attempt to help the rider hold the bike upright when it is stopped. Keep your feet safe by keeping them on the foot pegs at all times.

8. Place your hands on the rider's hips. That is the best way to hold on to the rider, and it keeps you in touch with the rider's movements. Keep your weight centered over the motorcycle. Try not to move around any more than is necessary, particularly when the motorcycle is stopped, as it affects the balance of the motorcycle.

9. Motorcycles turn by leaning (banking like an airplane), not by steering like a car. So don't be alarmed when the motorcycle leans over to go around a corner. To position yourself perfectly for a turn, just look over the rider's shoulder in the direction of the turn. If the motorcycle is turning right, look over the rider's right shoulder; if it is turning left, look over the rider's left shoulder.

You don't have to do anything else; looking naturally over the rider's inside shoulder will automatically put your weight right where it belongs in a turn. Keep your body in line with the rider's body to prevent the motorcycle from leaning more than the rider intends. (When going straight, it doesn't matter which shoulder you look over.) Never lean out of a turn; you could cause an accident that way, which is another big no-no.

10. When the rider puts on the brakes, it causes a forward weight transfer. If the rider is forced to break hard, as in an emergency, this forward weight transfer is very apparent; you will be forced against the rider, and you will start to slide forward on the seat. Don't panic. Try to keep back, away from the rider. Resist sliding forward by pressing your feet against the footpegs; use your thigh muscles to control your position on the seat.

If you slide forward, you force the rider forward, reducing the rider's control over the motorcycle. It also moves the weight distribution of the motorcycle forward, reducing the weight on the rear tire and therefore the traction of the rear tire, making it more likely that the back tire will start to skid. Obviously, none of this is desirable.

11. You can be an active participant in the ride by staying alert and being prepared. Help the rider look for potential danger, and be prepared to hang on and hold yourself back if you anticipate a need for sudden braking. Likewise, if the rider is forced to swerve the motorcycle to avoid a hazard in the road, you need to be prepared for the sudden lean and change of direction.

You can also help the rider scan for animals that may run into the road. Dogs and deer are particularly unpredictable, and you may see a deer on a hillside above the road, or a dog in somebody's front yard, before the rider. (After all, the rider is concentrating primarily on the road.) If you spot a hazard of any sort that you think the rider is unaware of, rap the rider on the appropriate shoulder, and point at the hazard in a way that brings it to the rider's attention.

__________________




Dave

GWBBA #9

rocketmoto.com


 

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Good advice. So far, I have always insisted on mounting first. I just don't trust the side or center stand to keep the bike stable. I'd rather have a good grip in it myself. I do always try to warn about floorboards/footpegs and exhaust. The wing isn't too bad about exhaust, but the CB900 I used to have would leave a mark on you in an instant.
Also, my riding habits are way different two up. My main concern is to take care of the passenger. No floorboard scraping or fast acceleration/riding. I'm always trying to protect the young lady on the back.
Jim(inSC)
 

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Before my trike, it was the wife first - always. She only weights 115 lbs so no worries about it going over. that started in the early 70's that way, never changed. Even now with the trike, women first. Kind of the same in etiquette - you know, women first :D

Oh, and I get off first as well. Again, always have. Well I went and blew the etiquette thing getting off :cool:
 
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