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Hello, Just got this engine delivered here to AL. GL1200 and was going to swapwith my engine on my 84. However when the engine arrived I found thecrank shaft couldn't be turned over. I noticed that the left intake ports had what looked like dirt or sand in them. Turned out to be a dirt dobber nest. That had got wet and the dirt or mud got into the cylinder. That was the reason the engine crank wouldn't turn. I have now pulled the head on the left and removed all the crud but noticed the cylinder wall is pitted from rusting in the area that was covered with the mud. My question is, has anyone seen this before and is there a way to fix this. Only the leftfront cylinder is this way. I tried to buff the wall with fine sand paper and oil. And even tried a wire brush. Does this mean I will have to find another engine or will it run for a while. Help, Thanks Tom:?
 

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I've dealt with an 1100 that had similar problems. Water had gotten into the left two cylinders and caused a fair amount of rust and corrosion. I polished it out with fine wet/dry sand paper and reassembled the engine. It ran, smoked a bit at first but I think that was mostly old oil in the mufflers because the smoking cleared up after a bit of riding. Later on I checked the compression and found all four cylinders around 165psi a maximum of two or three psi differences. I don't like the idea of pitting in the cylinders but if it's only in one area and not too deep it probably won't hurt it much. The only way you can find out is to put it back together and try it.
One thing to be careful with is to check the valves to make sure there's no serious rust on the stems. It would be a good idea to remove the valves and clean any crud off them as well as lubricating the guides. Some engines that have been allowed to corrode in the cylinders also have rust on the valve stems which can cause a valve to stick open. This is not a good thing on an interference engine.
 

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if you can get the cly as far down as possible you can hone it with cylinder hone and drill. pretty easy to do and i don't think your going to get all the pitting out if it's very bad.but i'm with exavid i don't think one spot is going to make it unuesable or cause it to smoke. what have you got to loose but time and a head gasket. if your afraid of it i have an engine that someone put the belts on wrong needs heads. had 38000 miles on it and it just happens to be an 84. you can have it but i'm in tn and you'd have to use your pgs on it and your carbs.:action::action:
 

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Thanks to everyone for the advice on the cylinder problem. Where does everyone get their head gaskets. I see them on eBay but wonder if they are available elsewhere. Will let you know how it works out. Thanks, Tom in AL
 

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Personally I buy the Honda head gaskets even though they are overpriced. I know many members here use aftermarket ones and have no problems at all.
 

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I agree with all of the above.

just hone the cylinder enough to get rid of the high spots. Don't worry about the pitting. new OEM head gaskets and put it together.

After about 100,000 miles from now, take the heads off and see how it is doing. :action:
 

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I've had both good and bad luck with aftermarket head gaskets. The problem is that they are not all the same depending on who made them. I've not had a problem with OEM gaskets. In my opinion, for what it's worth, is that the critical part of changing head gaskets is first cleaning the mating surfaces of the head and case of old gasket material without marring the surfaces. Next is cleaning the threads of the head bolts and lubricating the threads and under the bolt heads with MOLY PASTE, not moly grease or any of the cheaper stuff. The last thing is to bolt up the head with a torque wrench using the specified pattern and bringing the torque up in three steps, a bit at a time. I like to re-check the torque on the bolts once more when I've run the engine a few hours because the heat/cool cycle tends to compress the gasket a bit more sometimes. I think this is specially important with aftermarket gaskets. Be careful when installing the head gaskets because they can be reversed, ie, flipped left to right so the rear end of the gasket is toward the front of the bike and vice versa. If you get it on backwards, at least on the 1100s, not sure about the 1200, you'll get a major oil leak. It's because the gasket isn't symmetrical down by the small bolt at the bottom center of the head.
 
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