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I have been told that there is rust in my gas tank and the rust is getting into my carbs. The technician told me there is a way to treat the tank by coating it with 3 coats of an epoxy type material. He says the removal of the tank is the most difficult task. He also mentioned the breathing tubes could be damaged if I was not careful. A new tank is not an option as they are not available for a 1980 GL1100. Actually the bike runs ok but under load in the higher gears it sputters a bit . It is much better since I put carb cleaner in a couple of tanks of fuel. Does anybody have any input?
 

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Removing the gas tank is a big pain in the ... But so is having to remove the carbs all the time to clean them. Depending on how bad ly rusted the tank is you may want to invest in a pile of fuel filters and change them often. I would probably carry the tools needed and some spare filters with me.
 

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I'm in the exact same boat. We both run the risk of jamming up the fuel pump.

Unfortunately, the only proper solution seems to be removal of the tank, and re-lining it. It sucks that people don't store these bikes properly and cause future headaches/cost to owners.

I'm going to live with mine by changing my fuel filters often. An inexpensive bandaid until i'm prepared to pay or pull the tank myself.
 

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Thanks for the info. I have not changed the fuel filter since I got the bike 3 years ago. I will check my Hanes manual on how to do this. Could you tell me if the Clymer manual is better than the Hanes, as I am new at attempting to work on bikes other than wires, plugs, oil filter etc.
 

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As long as your fuel filter is upstream from your pump and carbs, there shouldn't be any rust getting into anything but the filter. For the short term, I'd just put an over sized filter in the line and carry a spare. For the long term two alternatives seem viable to me, one is to haunt eBay and the various bike salvage outfits on the net to find a better tank; the other is to pull your tank, sand or bead blast it or chemically remove the rust and coat it. There are several good fuel tank sloshing compounds on the market, they are used in aviation too. Cleaning and coating your tank should do the job but you might want to do a little light poking with a sharp scribe around the worst rusted parts of the tank to make sure there's still enough metal left. You don't want the thing to crack or start pin-holing. Small pinholes will seal with sloshing, but larger weak spots might cause the tank to fail in a big way.
 

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that's a good point, Paul, re: sourcing a better tank
 

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had same problem with my 77 gl1000, and yes it is a pain to take out the tank, You have to remove rear tire, rear fender, innerfender, and the final drive, It's not the worse job, but is time consuming, I don't know if you can use the tank sealer linings becouse there are the pick up screens in the bottom over the pick up tubes, I don't know if they will clog up or not, I got lucky and found a tank on ebay for a big wopping 99 cents, and it was 12 bucks shipping, so not a bad deal for me.

I'd try to find a different tank, unless other people have done the reseal jobs without any problems, I have done it to other tanks, but on those I could remove the pepcock and there was no screens in side to plug. so I'm not sure on the goldwings if thats an option, I don't know how you would keep it out of the screens and tubes,

Good Luck
 

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Thanks Gearhead76. your advice is the same as the Honda dealer had. He was worried about the screens and devices you mentioned that are located in the tank. I am going to leave it for now. Tom
 

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The tank isn't so bad... took about 45 minutes to do mine, and the final drive does not have to come out (at least on a GL1000).
 

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Before I would pull the tank, I woud remove the drain plug and get the gas out. Then remove the gas gauge sending unit. Then hook a heavey duty garden hose to the hot water heater outlet at the bottom of the house hot water heater. Then flush the tank with as hot of water as I could get out of the water heater. Do this a couple of times. Then use avatation-permetex the non harding type I think and coat the threads of the drain plug so it woun't leak. Use 2 filters in the line going to the fuel pump and a smaller one like that used on riding lawn morwers in the line going from the pump to the carbs.
 

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exavid wrote: My mechanic told me the filter would stop big chunks, but not fine/sandy sediment. It seems that removing/re-lining or replacing the tank is quite excessive. Can i really get away with just keeping fresh filters without buggering up the carbs?
As long as your fuel filter is upstream from your pump and carbs, there shouldn't be any rust getting into anything but the filter. For the short term, I'd just put an over sized filter in the line and carry a spare. For the long term two alternatives seem viable to me, one is to haunt eBay and the various bike salvage outfits on the net to find a better tank; the other is to pull your tank, sand or bead blast it or chemically remove the rust and coat it.  There are several good fuel tank sloshing compounds on the market, they are used in aviation too. Cleaning and coating your tank should do the job but you might want to do a little light poking with a sharp scribe around the worst rusted parts of the tank to make sure there's still enough metal left. You don't want the thing to crack or start pin-holing. Small pinholes will seal with sloshing, but larger weak spots might cause the tank to fail in a big way.
 
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