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Hi all,

Hoping someone can point me in the right direction.

I just received a 1980 Goldwing GL-1100 Interstate. I also have a 1972 CB 750-four (K2).

I'm not sure how to describe my performance problem, so I'll compare the performance to my 750.

With my 750, if a car goes by at 80 km/hr, I could pull out from a stop sign and keep up to it immediately, going though the gears quickly.

With my GL-1100, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd gears seem gut less... If I crack the throttle, the rpm's jump high quickly, but there is no speed to go with it... If I accelerate slowly, it seems okay...

Its ok for cruising, but I expected a lot lot more from an 1100cc engine...

Seems like no snap at higher speeds either... ie: If I drop it from 5th to 4th and crack the throttle... a little acceleration... but again, not as much as I'd expect from an 1100cc engine...

I'm pretty sure one of the cylinder's rings is worn as I seen some oil leaking past it.
So, it does burn a little smoke.

But I'm wondering if I need to rebuild the engine to resolve the lack of power or get my carbs adjusted/balanced...

Any ideas?

Thanks in advance!
 

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The 1100 is no slouch, sounds like you have one or more problems.

Since it's burning oil I'd check the compression to get an idea of the condition of rings and valves.

"If I crack the throttle, the rpm's jump high quickly, but there is no speed to go with it... If I accelerate slowly, it seems okay... "

That sounds like the clutch slipping.
 

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First of all welcome to the forum!!

I really can't help much.. I suspect it is not an engine problem, but maybe carbs or ignition.. reasons? (1) Goldwing engines practically run forever.. and (2) it is a very heavy bike and not exactly a rocket.. although I think 14 second quarters (recalling by memory??) are still respectable... and even if it is an engine that is tired, you are far better off finding a used engine.. lots of them are available..
 

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Wow, thanks Dan! That was quick.

Bummer, I was hoping for a simply carb adjustment...

But, yeah, now that you say that, it does feel like the rear tire is 'catching' up to the engine..

So, is clutch slipping serious? Its more then just adjusting the cable I'm guessing??

Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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Thanks sandiegobrass, looks like a really informative and friendly place to hang out!

Yeah, I really love my old Honda 750-four engine, no smoke or anything. I'm hoping that with a little encouragement (new rings) my 1100 will hopefully last just as long and provide just as much, if not more, enjoyment...

I've had my 750 pop out of 4th gear when really accelerating quickly. The goldwing stays in gear, but like I mentioned to Dan, the rear end can't seem to keep up...

I will probably get the carbs balanced & adjusted. I think that is a good idea, also I'll probably have someone check out the clutch if it is over my head...

All those clutch plates just look scary!!!

Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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Thank you too William!

Wow, I was hoping to get an answer and got 2 great answers and a confirmation!

This place is great!

Can a slipping clutch be easily fixed? Or is a replacement usually necessary?
 

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On the clutch slippage, it could be as easy as changing out the oil to fix it.
I once had a slipping clutch but that was after adding some oil additive that thickens the oil, I was trying to find a engine knock. Who knows what the prior owner put in it.
Try a good quality 10/40 motorcycle oil.
 

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1987 GL1200 Interstate
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Hi 80, welcome to the forum.

You may well have a damaged clutch but it's more likely someone has been using car oil in the bike. Many car oils will coat the clutch plates and cause them to slip.

Anyway, before you pay someone to tear the clutch out, it may be a good idea to run some kind of crankcase cleaner through it. (Many here like Sea-Foam) And give it a couple of oil changes with wet-clutch-specific motorcycle oil before you give up on the clutch. It may come back.

As far as the carbs go, I wouldn't worry about them right now, but some plugs might help the power.

Running right, a GL11 should easily stomp and tromp a single-cam 750.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
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Awesome. Thanks Dan & Bike...and Dennis.

That is great news. I already have some seafoam and will try that first, then use some good wet-clutch motorcycle oil as suggested.

Thanks again!!!

PS: stomp & tromp... hehe. I like the sound of that. Sounds like this is gonna be a fun bike!
 

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clutch plates are at the rear of the engine, a little hard place to work but its possible without droping the engine.
It could be something very simple as a bad adjusted clutch cable so check that first.
you can also try seafoam on the oil for 100+ miles and see if it helps.
 

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As for the Seafoam I'd use no more than what it says on the bottle as I'm not a big fan of ANY engine flushes.
My opinion is flushing stirs up the crap in the sump which isnt hurting anything left there. Changing the oil and filter every 1000 miles 3-4 times using 10/30 is much easier on the bearings.
 

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80Goldwing, also try adjustments to your clutch cable, a rusty cable will release the plates and clutch material slowly causing RPM surge and little or no speed increase, but as all have said that 1100 will catch up aqnd eat a 750 no problem. I am sure the cable is a bit crusted
 

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I'd forgotten that the 11 has a cable-actuated clutch. As William and ARKnapp say, that too could cause the symptoms you're experiencing. Could just need adjusting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
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Ah yes, the cable did need some adjusting... Must better now... At least I scoot across the intersection anyway... ;-)

But still, seems to still want to slip if I'm cracking the throttle too hard too fast...

I did lube the cable, but it still requires a bit of force to pull the clutch back... If I give the clutch a little time to get in sync after I release it, it doesn't seem to slip... So maybe the plates are a little slow to release... as ARKnapp suggested. (thx)

I think the compression is shot on the left side, just from feeling the difference in exhust from left & right muffler. I hear a nice pop sound on the right side as it echo's off my palm. But I just get a little puff puff off the left side...

The previous owner was using regular car oil in it, but I've done 2 oil changes already with good motorcycle oil 10w40. So maybe it will dilute the car oil off the clutch.. ???

Not sure if that makes sense... lol

Anyway, thanks for the tips. Runs much better now.
 

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Automotive oil is okay as long as it doesn't say 'energy conserving', 'friction reducing' or such in the API donut on the container. I've used Chevron DELO 400 15w40 in all my bikes for years. My '93 GL1500 has run on the stuff for over 90,000 miles now and with a total of 130,000 miles on the odometer runs like a new bike. It doesn't use a drop of oil in 4000 miles. Your oil burn is more likely to be valve stem seals than valve guides or rings. Don't guess at compression, Get a compression gauge set, they're inexpensive at Harbor Freight, and test the engine. Be sure to have the engine warmed up, kill switch set to kill, battery well charged, and with the choke off and the throttle wide open measure the pressure on each cylinder. The most important thing is that all the cylinders are within 5psi or so of each other. It's good to have 165psi or more total pressure but that will vary a lot depending on the condition of your starter and the battery.
Personally if I had a clutch slipping problem the first thing I'd do would be to replace the clutch cable and set the proper free play. That will insure the cable is releasing the clutch completely and reduce the effort at the clutch lever. Then I'd change oil and put some miles on the bike then change the oil again. That will tend to clean things out. You also ought to check the brakes, the rear wheel ought to turn freely in neutral with the bike on the center stand. If you jack up the front of the bike to get the front wheel off the ground it should also turn freely. Also if you ride a mile or two using the brakes only very lightly the calipers should all be cool, if one's hot you probably have a frozen caliper which will drag and reduce performance. These are some of the easy, cheap things to check before getting into thinking about major surgery on the old machine.
FYI I had a 1982 Interstate which is actually a bit higher geared than the '80 so it wouldn't accelerate as fast as yours. My '82 was very quick, it ate Harleys for lunch and I'm pretty sure it was faster off the line than my six cylinder '93 Aspencade. Once you have your bike in shape I think you'll find it surprisingly quick.
 

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Hi exavid,

Thanks for the tips. That is good to know about the oil. I'll double check to see what the PO used.

My brother inlaw helped me put in some new valve stem seals. I noticed a small teaspoon+ oil in the bottom (side) in one cylinder... But, I'm learning that is normal for a older side stroke piston... I think...

I'll have to check to see if it smokes off the center stand as opposed to the kick stand... Plus, the oil is topped up, so I'm going to watch it and see what happens at the center mark. Dan mentioned how a full level might contribute to the smoke...

I just did a search and yeah, I guess those compression gauge are not that expensive...I had imagined more... lol.. yeah I figured my 'technique' was questionable at least..:D

And your right about the clutch cable, I should just take it right out of the equation and get a new one. thanks for the nudge... hehe

I'm starting to get a little giddy over the power issue. Sounds like this bike can haul ass... :banana:
 

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bro the 1100 is an awesome bike much stronger than my 750-4
was (and I bought that one new) However my 1500 smokes it off the line and top end and shes got over 160,000 on her
but when I'm all by myself I still enjoy my 1100
 

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I finally got fed up with my clutch slipping when pulling a trailer over the West Virginia mountains coming home from buying some parts from a fellow forum member.

I ran some Seafoam through the oil, changed the filter and oil, This and a cable adjustment got rid or the slippage. The bottom adjustment was way off at the clutch.
 

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Good advice by all, don't forget the 1100's like high RPM's... above 3,000 & they are not scared to run close to redline all day long :action:
 
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