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I took my GL1100A out for one last pre-winter ride tonight, a toasty 38 degrees outside. Once I got it home, nice and warm, I drained and changed the oil and filter, and pulled the plugs. I squirted oil in the cylinders, and put the plugs back in - and as I torqued the first one, I thought; "this feels like a bit more than it's supposed to take" - just as I felt it give.

After lots of swearing, I pulled the socket out, and the top half of the plug (including the center electrode) came with it. That part of the plug had separated from the bottom half of the plug (the part with the threads, the side electrode, and the center ceramic insulator). The bottom half remains screwed securely into the block - thankfully it was the plug that gave way, and not the threads in the block.

I tried a couple things to get the plug remains out of the block, without luck.

Is there a tool that does this? Or can anyone suggest anything?
 

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maybe reduce the end of your shop vac hose with some pvc fittings and see if you can vacuum it out:baffled:eek:r are you trying to get the threaded end out:baffled:. I think i misreadthe post and ez out like said. Sorry JB
 

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GSMacLean,

Yes, there is. It is called an "ease out". You can get one at any auto parts. You have to use a drill, and it drills the broken part to a lock hole. Flip it over, and using the drill, you can then easily remove the part in the Goldwing. Beware of the kits. Just get the one you need.

There is another advertised on TV, but I cannot remember what it is called.

Hope this helps,

Good Luck,

God Bless,

Nightrider1

GSMacLean wrote:
I took my GL1100A out for one last pre-winter ride tonight, a toasty 38 degrees outside. Once I got it home, nice and warm, I drained and changed the oil and filter, and pulled the plugs. I squirted oil in the cylinders, and put the plugs back in - and as I torqued the first one, I thought; "this feels like a bit more than it's supposed to take" - just as I felt it give.

After lots of swearing, I pulled the socket out, and the top half of the plug (including the center electrode) came with it. That part of the plug had separated from the bottom half of the plug (the part with the threads, the side electrode, and the center ceramic insulator). The bottom half remains screwed securely into the block - thankfully it was the plug that gave way, and not the threads in the block.

I tried a couple things to get the plug remains out of the block, without luck.

Is there a tool that does this? Or can anyone suggest anything?
 

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I've had this happen before, an easy out did the trick.
 

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Sorry about your bad luck, but there's no fix for that problem...but, I'll be happy take the bike off your hands for 5 or 600 $$ :shock::shock::shock:

Easy-out is the way, just be sure to use a shopvac to suck out all the metal filings before removing the remainder of the plug.
 

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GSM - I had this happen with one of my cars years ago. The plugs were rusted in and whenI tried to loosen them one plug broke off in the hole. I ended up trying the normal reverse-thread easy outs, and no luck. No matter how hard I turned on the easy out, it would'nt budge. I was afraid to break off the hardened easy out in the hole.

I spoke with a friend who told me of a new "square" type of easy out that you tap into the hole. The four corners dig in like a cutting bit. They do not "expand" in the broken off part, and make it easier to remove. I tapped in the largest square easy out in the kit, heated the area with a propane torch and the plug spun right out. I bought mine at Sears, kit # 952315 for $12.99.



Of course you have to knock out the center electrode totap inthe bit, which will complicate things....may have to remove the head to get the debris out....

Good luck to you !!!
 

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Please be VERY careful when using an easy out. Do not use a lot of torque on the easy out or else it WILL break off, turning this into a nightmare.

If the remains of the spark plug doesn't come out easily with light torque on the easy out, STOP. It will save you $$ and heartache if you take your bike to an experienced auto or bike mechanic or a machine shop.
 

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mdbauer1962 wrote:
GSM - I had this happen with one of my cars years ago. The plugs were rusted in and whenI tried to loosen them one plug broke off in the hole. I ended up trying the normal reverse-thread easy outs, and no luck. No matter how hard I turned on the easy out, it would'nt budge. I was afraid to break off the hardened easy out in the hole.

I spoke with a friend who told me of a new "square" type of easy out that you tap into the hole. The four corners dig in like a cutting bit. They do not "expand" in the broken off part, and make it easier to remove. I tapped in the largest square easy out in the kit, heated the area with a propane torch and the plug spun right out. I bought mine at Sears, kit # 952315 for $12.99.



Of course you have to knock out the center electrode totap inthe bit, which will complicate things....may have to remove the head to get the debris out....

Good luck to you !!!
This sounds like what I will do. The center electrode actually came out with the broken piece - all that is left is some of the porcelain insulator in the center, and the threads.

Being that what holds the plug tight into the hole is the hex nut part of the plug, pushed against the crush washer which pushes against the head, and the hex nut part and the crush washer are gone, I'm hoping the remaining part should come out reasonably easily. I'm going to have another look at it tomorrow and see if I can convince it to come out.

And from now on, I will be using my torque wrench on my plugs, instead of just winging it like I always have (i.e. finger tight then 1/2 turn). :)
 

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The correct procedure on instaling new plugs are as folows. When you start the New Spark Plug into your Goldwing, #1 Put it in by hand two make sure you do not get a crossthread. #2 Put your spark plug wrench on it, ans as soon as you feel the Spark plug touch the end of the thread, #3 Just give it ONLY1/2 turn, and #4 put your caps back on. This comes right out of the Honda Manual, and as many plugs in any vechile, except a volkswagon or disel engine.

Good Luck.

God Bless,

Nightrider1

GSMacLean wrote:
mdbauer1962 wrote:
GSM - I had this happen with one of my cars years ago. The plugs were rusted in and whenI tried to loosen them one plug broke off in the hole. I ended up trying the normal reverse-thread easy outs, and no luck. No matter how hard I turned on the easy out, it would'nt budge. I was afraid to break off the hardened easy out in the hole.

I spoke with a friend who told me of a new "square" type of easy out that you tap into the hole. The four corners dig in like a cutting bit. They do not "expand" in the broken off part, and make it easier to remove. I tapped in the largest square easy out in the kit, heated the area with a propane torch and the plug spun right out. I bought mine at Sears, kit # 952315 for $12.99.



Of course you have to knock out the center electrode totap inthe bit, which will complicate things....may have to remove the head to get the debris out....

Good luck to you !!!
This sounds like what I will do. The center electrode actually came out with the broken piece - all that is left is some of the porcelain insulator in the center, and the threads.

Being that what holds the plug tight into the hole is the hex nut part of the plug, pushed against the crush washer which pushes against the head, and the hex nut part and the crush washer are gone, I'm hoping the remaining part should come out reasonably easily. I'm going to have another look at it tomorrow and see if I can convince it to come out.

And from now on, I will be using my torque wrench on my plugs, instead of just winging it like I always have (i.e. finger tight then 1/2 turn). :)
 

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My beater plow truck blew the center of the plug out. I used an easy out, but it wouldn't budge. I finally started the engine, and ran it up to temp. Bingo! The heat did the trick.
 

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I did the same on my old Chevy a couple of times. A square removal tool worked for me. Heat causes holes to expand. That goes for all holes. Aluminum expands faster then steel. I'd use heat at the same time. Before I put a plug in I recommend using a plug thread chaser to remove carbon. I don't think a hot aluminum engine is a good thing to screw a steel plug into as the resultant fit will be pretty tight after it cools. Warm; O.K., but not hot. Good luck, you will need it.
 

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Nightrider1 wrote:
The correct procedure on instaling new plugs are as folows. When you start the New Spark Plug into your Goldwing, #1 Put it in by hand two make sure you do not get a crossthread. #2 Put your spark plug wrench on it, ans as soon as you feel the Spark plug touch the end of the thread, #3 Just give it ONLY1/2 turn, and #4 put your caps back on. This comes right out of the Honda Manual, and as many plugs in any vechile, except a volkswagon or disel engine.
That's exactly what I did (I have the Honda manual), and that's what sheared it - I know what it normally feels like at 1/2 turn, and it felt tighter than usual - just before it sheared.

It also says in the manual it should be 12 ft-lbs, so I'll set it to that next time, I suppose.
 

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Put a big glob of grease on and in the hollow of the plug before you drive the ease out in the remaining part. Should keep any metal bits from falling where you do not wish them to, and if grease gets into the chamber, will not hurt anything.

Kit
 

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GSMacLean wrote:
Nightrider1 wrote:
The correct procedure on instaling new plugs are as folows. When you start the New Spark Plug into your Goldwing, #1 Put it in by hand two make sure you do not get a crossthread. #2 Put your spark plug wrench on it, ans as soon as you feel the Spark plug touch the end of the thread, #3 Just give it ONLY1/2 turn, and #4 put your caps back on. This comes right out of the Honda Manual, and as many plugs in any vechile, except a volkswagon or disel engine.

That's exactly what I did (I have the Honda manual), and that's what sheared it - I know what it normally feels like at 1/2 turn, and it felt tighter than usual - just before it sheared.

It also says in the manual it should be 12 ft-lbs, so I'll set it to that next time, I suppose.
The 1/2 turn method is only valid for NEW crush washers.. If you are reusing the washer you MUST use the torque method... (You have seen the result. After the washer is crushed, there is no more 1/2 turn available; something must give.)
 

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If you haven't already gotten the plug threads out you might try this as a precaution:
first of all, I agree that the easy-out should remove the threads and probably without any problem but... since you have to remove the porcelain to install the easy-out there might be fragments that fall into the cylinder.
Remove the valve cover for the effected cylinder. Rotate the engine by hand (via the alternator bolt in the rear of the engine) till you see that the intake valve is completely closed AND the exhaust valve is slightly open... about 1/8th inch open. Then, and only then, remove the porcelain and easy-out the threads. That way if any debris does fall into the cylinder you can use compressed air through the spark plug hole to blow out the debris through the open exhaust valve.
In this case I partially agree with using grease to catch the debris because IF the grease falls into the cylinder it will still have metal debris on the grease and could damage one of both of the valves, not to mention possibly gougeing the cylinder or the piston rings during start up.
Grease should be applied to the easy-out before installing it but IF metal fragments do get into the engine they can be blown out if the exhaust/intake valves are positioned as I discribed.
Hope this all works out for you!!!
 

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GS,

If you have a little powerful vaccum, before you knock out the center, use the smallest end you have, and use some duct tape, and get the smallest funnel you have, trim the end downand tape it over the ond of the vaccum, so it will fit in the spark plug hole, and try to pull the proken porcelain out od the cylinder with that. Make sure your pison is up to the top before you do this, and make sure you dont hit the piston. Then, get a Long("Q) tip, with some vaseloine on it, (Very Little Vasoline) and clean the top of the piston wit that.You should be able to remove 99%+ of it. Poecelain can cut the walls ofthe cylinder if not careful. Do this over and over to make sure you get it all out!

Good Lock,

Nightrider1

GSMacLean wrote:
I took my GL1100A out for one last pre-winter ride tonight, a toasty 38 degrees outside. Once I got it home, nice and warm, I drained and changed the oil and filter, and pulled the plugs. I squirted oil in the cylinders, and put the plugs back in - and as I torqued the first one, I thought; "this feels like a bit more than it's supposed to take" - just as I felt it give.

After lots of swearing, I pulled the socket out, and the top half of the plug (including the center electrode) came with it. That part of the plug had separated from the bottom half of the plug (the part with the threads, the side electrode, and the center ceramic insulator). The bottom half remains screwed securely into the block - thankfully it was the plug that gave way, and not the threads in the block.

I tried a couple things to get the plug remains out of the block, without luck.

Is there a tool that does this? Or can anyone suggest anything?
 

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At least now you know which plug was misfiring! Just trying to get you to smile! It'll come out,I always squirt some Liquid Wrench, or whatever I have on the bugger the night before, and then go for it. I agree some heat will help you bust it loose. Sorry this happened. I am scared to change mine, I have no Idea how long they been in there,as I'm the second owner.It runs great so I'm putting it off. Good easyouting to you! jimsjinx
 

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I winder what would happen if you sprayed it down with some oil, and started the engine to see if the porcelain could blow out of the center of the broken plug? It has to be cracked.? That might be worth a try!

Good Luck,

Nightrider1
 

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GSMacLean wrote:
Nightrider1 wrote:
The correct procedure on instaling new plugs are as folows. When you start the New Spark Plug into your Goldwing, #1 Put it in by hand two make sure you do not get a crossthread. #2 Put your spark plug wrench on it, ans as soon as you feel the Spark plug touch the end of the thread, #3 Just give it ONLY1/2 turn, and #4 put your caps back on. This comes right out of the Honda Manual, and as many plugs in any vechile, except a volkswagon or disel engine.
That's exactly what I did (I have the Honda manual), and that's what sheared it - I know what it normally feels like at 1/2 turn, and it felt tighter than usual - just before it sheared.

It also says in the manual it should be 12 ft-lbs, so I'll set it to that next time, I suppose.
That 1/2 turn is likely for a "New" plug with an uncrushed washer. Once it has been installed once, it only needs to be snug, not the 1/2 turn stuff...
 
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