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Hello,
I was just able to get my new to me 83 GL1100 standard up and running well.
The bike has ~18k on the clock and spent a lot of it's life stored under a house in upstate NY. This is my first bike less than 38 years old and my first Goldwing so excuse any odd questions.

When driving on long sweeping corners at high speed I am noticing the bike shifting. It feels like it's coming from the rear end and the bike is trying to move upright.

I have brand new tires on ( bike still had factory tires! ) suspension at 20 front n 50 rear and holds air. I greased everything when putting the rear wheel back on and all the splines looked great. Not sure what else to check?
Any suggestions?
 

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Anti-Guru
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we had recently been discussing similar complaints for a 1500... thoughts cam to the head bearings (steering) being too loose or "notchy"...

You may wanna sit the bike up on it's center stand, then lift the front of the frame so that the front wheel is in free to rotate and "steer". "steer" your bike from side-to-side feeling for looseness and/or strange behaviors aroud the centered position - you should have a smooth feel all the way from lock to lock.

Also the swingarm bearings may e suspect (generally an inspection and re-lubrication is all that would be necessary.

Is there any chance that either bearing set could've rusted while in storage?
 

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Thanks for the response. The side stand, centerstand and exhaust cross over are covered in rust. Some of the clear coated aluminum has minor pitting. It's kinda weird the rest of the bike just has dust on it, the frame looks good as do all the electrical connections and 99% of the stickers.
All I can think of is the bike was driven in rain a lot?

I can check the swing arm and steering head bearings. My cb450 has swing arm bushings that need regular checks assuming it's a similar story for this big girl.
 

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Monkey with a Football
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Be sure to check for rusted out swing arms in the inside corners. They like to do that.
 

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Gregarious Greeter
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[align=center]

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[align=center]Welcome gguerdat[/align]
 

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The thoughts on steering head bearings, swing arm bearings, etc. are good ones.

20 lbs. and 50lbs. are a bit high for the suspension. Is there any oil leaking from the forks or rear shocks? Is it possible there isn't any oil left in either?

If the bike was stored on a damp concrete surface or dirt I would check very carefully for rusted frame or swing arm parts. Poke at any even slightly suspect area with a small screwdriver or an awl. The center stand area and the swing arm are likely suspects.

I've had a car stored on a concrete garage floor and the frame rusted so badly that I had to junk the car. Pieces of rust had fallen off, and the car was not moved or touched.

Good luck with your new toy,

Lyle
 

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not shure if it may have been in a small flood to get the stand and centerstand rusted. I have pulled a car out of a garage that was parked there for over 15 yrs. It also was junk frame rust. The swingarm bushing may also be sticking and rusted causing handling problems. Like others say take a sharp pick and dig hars around the lower frame.
Wilf
 

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The shocks could have lost the oil over time (and still hold pressure) with no sign of it leaking sill visible. That will cause a wallowing sensation on sweeping curves.
 

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I am sure you already did, however, we would be remiss if not mentioning changing the belts. Right? Welcome bty
 

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+ at least 1 on the belts

They can be purchased at your local auto parts store for far less than Mother Honda wants for them.

Timing Belts

GL1000 & GL1100
Gates - #5119 or #T274 (2ea.)
NAPA - #250274 (2 ea.)
Goodyear - #40274 (2 ea.)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
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Wow thanks for all the feedback and warm welcome!
I have new timing belts and bearings on my shelf just need to pickup the wheel studs to do the conversion.

I do not see oil leaking from the front shocks, the current dampening effect is awesome compared to my 450. Would not hurt to change it though.
I do get some oil out of the rear shocks when I let air out. It's just a mist though not like a stream.

I picked at some of the bike before I bought it but not the swingarm.
Im out of town right now but will be sure to dig-in on Saturday.
-G
 

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So There was no play in the rear swingarm, which is great! I pulled the caps on the sides and there is some very light rust dust but nothig serious looking. The left side has an Allen key head and what looks like a locking collar. Will need to pickup the bit to fit my torque wrench before I pull it apart to grease it up.
This weekend I will change the oil out and pickup studs for the timing belt conversion.
-G
 

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Still Learning
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gguerdat wrote:
So There was no play in the rear swingarm, which is great! I pulled the caps on the sides and there is some very light rust dust but nothig serious looking. The left side has an Allen key head and what looks like a locking collar. Will need to pickup the bit to fit my torque wrench before I pull it apart to grease it up.
This weekend I will change the oil out and pickup studs for the timing belt conversion.
-G
That's the second time you mentioned studs for the belts? Where are you getting that you need to get studs for the belts from?
 

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Ditto Rudy ., you describe a lot of rust underneath the bike , this should be checked out by cleaning the crap off and then go at the bottom frame and swing arm with a long heavy punch and hammer . Give a healthy smack to each location that looks rusty and weak. Pay special attencion to the inside of the swing arm as there is a weld lip that accumulates salt etc.
If all is well check all front and rear bearings as descibed .
 

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Discussion Starter #16
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OK,
Finally got to work on the bike. I poked all around on the underside and things feel really solid. I took a few pictures too.
The studs I am talking about are for the aftermarket timing belt tensioner bearing conversion.
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/forum9/56720.html
If I have this bike long enough to need another belt it will make locating the bearings much easier.
So I went to replace the rear shock and fork oil and the rear shocks had lost most of their air charge. So, looks like there is a leak in the system. I will order up the parts to put it all back together. I used ATF in the forks and they feel even better.
This bike makes my 450 feel like I am riding a coal cart!
Thanks for everyone's help! I am banking on re-built rear shocks to help straighten things out.
 

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