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Thanks for the welcome guys, I'm still going through old posts and finding info I wish I'd read before attempting some of the work I've done. Being of the philosophy that if you take every nut and bolt off, the problem is sure to show itself, has got me in trouble a few times.

Right now I'm staring at the shock air compressor, lying on my garage floor, and wondering if it would be worth just pulling all the air-assist components and swapping the existing shocks with a couple of standard Progressives? Any thoughts?

Thanks,
 

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I wouldn't recommend going to a spring shock on an Aspencade. The main reason for the air shock in the rear was so that you could adjust the suspension for changes such as solo and two up riding. If you go to a spring shock it's difficult to get at it to adjust the preload cam for differing loads due to the saddlebags. If the air shocks you have are the problem you can replace the seals or install Progressive 416s which is a combination air/spring shock. Not cheap but excellent shocks.

You might try looking into the air dryer on your compressor setup, I found the desiccant pretty well broken down and turned half to powder when I rebuilt an 1100 last year. Plugged up the compressor's source of air. I got new desiccant beads on eBay, cleaned the thing all up and it came back to life nicely. If you have the Helm Inc. service manual for the 1100 it gives good information with pictures and drawings on the air system. It's the best $36 you can spend on your bike.

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Thanks Exavid,
I took the compressor apart, the beads were fine but I did think the spring-loaded buttons for the front/rear and increase air were a bit sticky (maybe leaving the system open for air to escape). So I cleaned those up and it seems better. The shocks still compress more than I think they should (not enough oil in them from my last attempt?) but it'll do for now. I ordered that manual so I'll wait for it to arrive and in the meantime the weatherman say's it should be a reasonable week for riding.

Thanks again,
 

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I've been reading and looking through the posts.

Can anyone point me to a set of replacement springs for the rear?

I've got a 85 LTD, and I need to replace the rear springs.
Based on cost, I think I'm going to replace them with OEM or standard instead of progressive.

Anyone know where I can order the springs?
Do I need special tools to replace them?
 

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Come on you Experts (Guru's):3sum: Devil_Dog has a problem with the rear springs on his '85Ltd :12red:lets get some help to this guy

:leprechaun::18red::leprechaun:
 

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devil_dog,

http://www.mawonline.com/progress.htm#Shock%20springs

(76515) $49.95 Progressive Shock Spring Kit Mfg.#: 001172

Scroll down to the Shock Spring Kits. This is the springs you need. I put these on mine and LOVE them. Best money I have spent yet!!:waving:
 

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Snorebaby wrote:
devil_dog,

http://www.mawonline.com/progress.htm#Shock%20springs

(76515) $49.95 Progressive Shock Spring Kit Mfg.#: 001172

Scroll down to the Shock Spring Kits. This is the springs you need. I put these on mine and LOVE them. Best money I have spent yet!!:waving:


Thanks for the info.

I think this will do the trick on mine also. I have to run them about 80 PSI, or the bottom out VERY easily. The compressor doesn't seem to want to run it that high.
I believe I have other issues, as in the air lines, for the rear. The springs will make things much easier.

I hope they're not hard to put in.
 

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I read through the whole thread. It would seem a bit much for me to tackle.

I'm little short on space to accomplish some of this, and lack some of the tools.

What would anyone think is a fair price if I took it to someone else to have it done?
 

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Devil_Dog wrote:
I read through the whole thread. It would seem a bit much for me to tackle.

I'm little short on space to accomplish some of this, and lack some of the tools.

What would anyone think is a fair price if I took it to someone else to have it done?
It is not really hard to do, just time consuming. The hardest part was getting the bags and trailer hitch off to get to the springs, and that wasn't too bad. As far as space goes, I did mine in my driveway. Just put it on the center stand and remove, rebuild, replace one shock at a time.

As far as cost.....about an arm and a leg (figure about a minimum 4hr labor @ $65/hr for a shop to do it) compared to about $100 - $150for you to do it yourself.
 

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Great article, I decided to do the rebuild on my 85 Interstate, however the rear shocks (original) do not have a lower circlip but a thin wire retainer for the seal. Anyone have any ideas on how to remove it, thanks

Geoff
 

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:waving::waving:Welcome to the World's Greatest Goldwing Site GG1947! :waving::waving:

If you can compress the shock a small amount to take the pressure off the snap ring you should be able to get one end of the ring pried out of the slot a bit with a small screwdriver or machinist's scriber. Once you get an end pried up just slip a small screwdriver between the ring and the slot. Then just keep working it around, prying a bit up each time and using the screwdriver to hold it from going back into the groove.
 

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[align=center]Hey bruceabryan and GG1947 :waving: [shadow=orange]You are Both Very Welcome to The Worlds Greatest Goldwing Forum.[/shadow] :clapper::clapper::clapper::clapper:[/align]
[align=left]Would Both of you please update your profile and insert your LOCATION. :weightlifter:[/align]
[align=left]:leprechaun::18red::leprechaun:[/align]
 

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Thanks, will give it a try this weekend and advise how I made out. I have been working on my own bikes for years and just recently discovered this site, excellent place for help and information. I have attached a picture of the wire circlip in case anyone else runs into this system.

Geoff
 

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Worked just as advertised, by compressing the shock I could tap the retaining washer down slightly and pry out (carefully!) the spring circlip. Thanks for the tip. Now on to finishing the rebuild.

Geoff
 

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Finished the rebuild following the pictures by Gambler and Progressive's instructions and all worked fine. Couple of items worth mentioning - the Progressive replacement damper is now sealed and therefore does not require the same amount of fluid as the stock one, they say only 2 ozs are needed. Also the position of the circlip holding the springs is about 1/4 inch higher than stock. Other than this not difficult to do. In my previous post I mentioned having to compress the shock to get at the seal retaining circlip, not a problem when reassembling as the seal will go far enough into the shock body when there is no air pressure to seat it. Gambler's "home-made" shock compressor works great.
 

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what a great post gambler, i have a 1980 gl1100ka and when checking the pressure in the rear units i get a gold coloured fluid spitting out of the schrader valve, only a small amount, it clears itself till the next time i come to check the pressure. is this normal or do i have a problem. i have only had the bike for 2months and no service history came with it.

thanks kevin
 

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No problem, you're just getting a bit of the shock's oil that works it's way into the air lines. Sometimes a good bump can get oil into the air lines as the shock compresses suddenly.
 
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