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I emailed the guy he said he bought from the son of a deceased man about 6 months ago. Stated he was told it ran when it was parked. Also noted the front wheel seemed to not turn smoothly.
 

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Jump on it ! IMO!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
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I guess the only thing id be worried about is not having a clue where to start once I got it home, guess I need to pick up a few repair books. But I cant think of a better way to learn.
 

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serch this fourm i found all the repair books for my 81 gl1100 and my 76 gl 1000
got my gl 1000 for 200 not runnin g but in way worse shape so go for it .imo
 

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I'd recommend giving it a pass. After sitting for eight years it's hard to know what it's going to need but it's very likely the rubber parts and seals are going to be pretty tired. If you have the tools and experience to totally go through the bike I'd offer $400 but not a penny more. My bet is that getting that bike roadworthy will require nearly $1000 in parts. Tires and tubes, battery, seals, brake overhaul kits, master cylinder rebuild kits, carburetor parts, and the list goes on. If you're ready to take that on it can be a very satisfying experience. I used to have a shop where I rebuilt and sold GL1100s. It took me awhile to get smart enough to know what to buy and what to pass up. My first rebuild project ate my lunch. I paid $600 for an '82 and ended up with about $1200 dollars in parts and pieces, paint and over 200 hours working on it. The final price I got for it was $1200. A real learning experience.

If you are more interested in riding a 'Wing than working on one I'd recommend looking for a decent running 1100. You could find one of those for less than that 1000 would take to bring up into shape. A bike that's been recently ridden is likely to be a better risk than one that's been sitting for a long time.
 

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Actually im more interested in learning how to fix one up. I have a ninja 250 and a ural gear up that I scoot around on. Im no mechanic but really would like to learn to be. Since there are no motorcycle repair classes around I figured this would be the best way to learn. Completely stripping it down is something id actually like to do.
 

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I did it with an 83 aspencade, 36,000 miles, bought a non running, 13 year neglected for $500. You can do it with a 1000. Get the Honda repair manual.
 

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With that attitude, there is no better feeling than knowing that you did it yourself with pride, perseverence and a good application of elbow grease.

But, exavid is correct on what you should expect in parts costs. Lay it out up front, is the bike worth $400 + $1200 or $1600 to you when you get done with it?

Only you can answer that question. Look at it, does it need a lot of body work, painting? Paint can eat you alive, easily $1200 just for that alone.
 

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If you want to rebuild that bike for the satisfaction of doing it then it's well worth the cost. I get a lot of satisfaction resurrecting an old machine for another life on the road. It can be frustrating at time but it's worth doing as a labor of love. Do it right, tear the bike down to a bare frame, clean that up and repaint it as well as repainting all the black painted parts on the bike. A good 8" bench grinder with a couple of wire wheels on it is a much used tool on these jobs. I buff up every bolt and nut that goes back into one of these old bikes. On an 1000 an electic impact driver is worth it weight in gold. On those models the front cover as well as other parts are held on with Phillips screws instead of bolts. An impact driver will remove these with a lot less damage than a screwdriver. If you clean up each individual piece down to the bolts and nuts you'll have an outstanding bike at the end of the process. A fine wire wheel on a drill is very helpful in cleaning rust off chrome. The wire wheel will take off rust but won't damage good chrome. Do it right and don't cut any corners and you'll have a bike to be proud of that will make you feel good every time you see it.
 

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How much is he selling it for ?
 

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Hes asking $650 for it so you should be able to walk in with $500 cash in hand and get it. Either way the price is right. The Best part is that it has been in a garage thats a real plus You will be suprised at just how little it will take to get it to fire up. And at the price a little work to just get it to run you can flip it and move to something bigger and better if you want.
 

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I bought a 77 GL1000 that had not been run in 15 years. I had to go through every thing on the bike to get it going again. The major stuff took me six months and is an on going project. So far I have $1443 just in parts. I can't sell it and make any money on it as I have too much in it. It is a fun bike to ride and I am going to keep it. Still a worthwhile project.
 

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It can be done,I had an 82 Interstate I paid $400 for and put about $1200 into it getting it road worthy.Rode it for 3 years and 15,000 or so miles.When I bought my 1500 this spring I advertised the 82 on Craigslist and sold it the next day for $2000.Made $400 on it and got to enjoy it for 3 years.Money well spent.

Farmer
 

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Do it.. other then not knowing what the mechanical end is it looks great. Just go through the whole thing clean all electrical connectors etc. Drain and clean the tank re lube everything check everything real good and fire it up.
 

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I agree with you 100%, the satisfaction of bringing one of these back is gratifying. The information here and on the naked goldwing site will provide step by step (with photos) to fix everything that needs fixing with these bikes. that being said if you hope to make some money when you're done, not likely to happen on that year and with what you'll have to put into it for parts. I bought a naked 79 for $120 last winter (blown head gasket and water pump, plus carb kit from Randakk). she owes me about $700, luckily doesn't need tires. I put sportster mufflers on it, best .99 cents I ever spent. got a great sound.
 

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There is also a 77 listed in Des Moines CL for $325.
 

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You will need to clean the carbs before trying to fire up. The bad gas will have congealed in the jets. At least pull the bowls off and spray carb cleaner around the carb bottoms and the bowl, then fill the bowls with carb cleaner just to get a quick fire test. Flush the brake systems after sucking out the old fluid and bleed them out, you might not have to pull the calipers on three year set if that's all it was sitting. It is fun getting to know your bike.:action:
 
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