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I am thinking of adding a sidecar to my cycle as i am getting old with a bad knee. Would appreciate any comments from people with sidecar experience. Thanks.
 

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You should really try to have a ride on an outfit first, theres a lot to get used to. I was consideruing a 1500 rig and got a test rid on one a couple of years back. I rode it for about half a mile and the handlebars wobbled all over the place, frightened the life outa me! The rig in question was a Squire and had the stock front wheel on the bike. I think it really needed a different setup to handle properly.
 

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What country are you from? There are many sidecar specialists to be found in Europe and England, in the Netherlands it is very popular to have a sidecar (a narrow one) on Goldwing. Many trikes as well there.
 

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Never mind the side car ,,how much do they want for the plane :):):):)
 

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I had a tough time learning to ride with a side car. This was after riding for 35 years. If you do decide to go that route, take plenty of time to get used to it before you hit the streets.
 

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I rode a Harley Dyna super glide with a side car for about ten minuets in a parking lot and that was enought for me , i had to fight it all the way both accelerating and braking. So it must take some getting used to . Larry
 

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When that times comes for me, and it will, my choice will be a trike, either converting mine, or buying one outright.



Good grief, this post is3 year's old!
 

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Hi dery, here's a website with a good bit of hack information:

wexman wrote: [/b]



Never mind the side car ,,how much do they want for the plane :):):):)
Which one, the Dauntless torpedo bomber or the Liberator bomber?
 

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exavid wrote:
Hi dery, here's a website with a good bit of hack information:

wexman wrote: [/b]
Never mind the side car ,,how much do they want for the plane :):):):)
Which one, the Dauntless torpedo bomber or the Liberator bomber?
Paul, you forgot the link:baffled::baffled::cooldevil::cooldevil::cooldevil:
 

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Doesn't matter how old the post is, it's always in vogue when you can no longer hold your ride in an upright position, or pick it up from its' side, should the unthinkable happen.

No. 1, sidecars do take some getting used to and a certified riding class is a must. Sidecars must also be right for your motorcycle and set up properly or you will never be happy. Their are steering modifications that should be considered and a custom rear wheel that will accept an Auto tire should be on the list. If you don't have a 1500 with a reverse, then more customizing may be in order, especially if you have knee or back problems, pushing a motorcycle and sidecar is not very much fun. Even after all you have done to make the ride smooth, it may still take time and a few adjustments, to meet your riding demands.

It's taken me two plus years, choosing and buying my basic sidecar rig, This summer (2007)I hope to have it done and on the road. Slow and easy is a lot better than jumping in with both feet and a lot safer.

glcxrider
 

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http://www.dauntlessmotors.com

I don't know what happened to this link, I tried to put it back in my previous post and every time I send it, it's not there. Let's see if it stays in this post.
 

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exavid wrote:
http://www.dauntlessmotors.com

I don't know what happened to this link, I tried to put it back in my previous post and every time I send it, it's not there. Let's see if it stays in this post.




Oh that what happened, Paul. I thought you just plub forgot.:cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cooldevil::cooldevil::cooldj:
 

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How did my old posting from three years ago pop up?
 

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Just thought I'd change my Avtar so JohnBoy could see how his "lawn ornament" looked lately.
 

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Check out the following:

http://www.hackd.com http://www.sidecar.com yahoo groups, sidecar talk

The Hack'd magazine is in WV, and you should ride overand talk to them. The Sidecar Magic shop is near by, and good people. Many other good folks in the east who know sidecars. You will find links on the sidecar.com site to installers. These folks are very helpful. Call them and talk to them and get various bits of advice.Going to one or more sidecar rallies is very educational. That's how I got re-oriented to sidecars, after being away from the lopsided third wheel for a number of decades.

Sidecaring is a great sport, and I have a GL1100 set up with a sidecar. I love it, and I travel all over with my rig.Learning to DRIVE them is different from a two wheeler, but it's not that difficult. That said, getting a rig well set up often involves more than simply bolting a sidecar to the side of a stock motorcycle. It is often done that way, but it often drives like that, somewhat poorly but operable.

The sidecar.com site also has several publications on line about operating a sidecar. Read them, written by Hal Kendall.

In terms of setting up the rig, there are issues of toe in of the sidecar wheeland outward lean of the motorcycle - adjustments that effect the handling of the rig and the rear tire wear. Hal Kendall handles that information on his on-line publications. Sidecars are also light when turning to the right (assuming the sidecar is on the right). You need to learn how to operate them with this issue. One thing, with a single passenger,nevercarrythe passenger on the back of the motorcycle, always in the sidecar. Hal also goes through the dynamics of center of gravity and tip overissues. Important stuff!

Going more technical, folks change the front steering to extend the front steerwheel farther forward, which reduces the trail. This results in less pressure on the handlebars and eliminates shoulder soreness during long trips,and makes the rig easier to steer. Several ways to do this, including modified triple tree or a leading link front fork.Wider handlebars are often utilized.

Suspension often isupgraded, and then even going to car tires on the rear drive wheel of the motorcycle are further modifications that happen. Stock motorcycle tires on the drive wheel oftenwear only5,000 to 8,000 miles, vs. 30,000 for a rear drive wheel car tire.

And then, a sidecar reduces your gas mileage.

Spend a lot of time on the internet getting oriented. Sidecar rallies are also fantastic places to get oriented. You will find lots of information talking at rallies. My experience isthat after attending rallies, talking to installers on the phone,and reading on line,I ultimately made the right decision on my choice for going three wheels. I really enjoy my rig a whole lot, and aput on the miles, including long miles!

I want to add two things; First, I thought you were in the eastern US. I don't know where you are... And second, although trikes are quite popular, for the money, you are way ahead with a sidecar set up. For less than the cost of a trike conversion, you can set up a sidecar with leading link front fork on the motorcycle, car tires, upgraded suspension, and the sidecar.
 

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To all of the people "who rode one and it shook, was difficult, etc." It Wasn't set up right. A properly aligned rig is a joy to ride. In simple terms, driving a poorly set up rig islike driving a car with the front end out of alignment. If you have to fight it, there is a problem. LDHack has some great references listed. Check them out, and try and find someone with a properly set up rig to try. Also, if you are getting someone to mount it for you, check out their credentials first. Make sure they know what they are doing. Just because someone is a motorcycle mechanic, doesn't mean they know anything about sidecars.

Enjoy!
 
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