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2000 GL1500SE
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Discussion Starter #1
It's been awhile since I've seen this brought up, so I will do so. Has anyone had any experience using the silicone radiator hoses instead of the OEMs that Honda wants a fortune for? They are available from US makers as well as the ever present Chinese manufacturers. I know that some race cars and police vehicles use them, but have no knowledge of them being used on a Goldwing. I am in process of changing the timing belts on my 2000SE, and figured I might as well replace the hoses as well, even though they look in great shape.
 

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I think it would be hard to beat the OEM hoses, they last almost indefinitely.
 
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Impersonating a mechanic
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It's been awhile since I've seen this brought up, so I will do so. Has anyone had any experience using the silicone radiator hoses instead of the OEMs that Honda wants a fortune for? They are available from US makers as well as the ever present Chinese manufacturers. I know that some race cars and police vehicles use them, but have no knowledge of them being used on a Goldwing. I am in process of changing the timing belts on my 2000SE, and figured I might as well replace the hoses as well, even though they look in great shape.
Don't know anything about silicone radiator hoses, but do they soften up with heat as a rubber hose does? Or are they more flexible than rubber without the heat? I know I have to heat up the rubber hoses to get them onto my 1200's radiator, and even then it's a big PIA.
 

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I recently researched the question of "silicone vs rubber" as I prepared to do some work of one of my cars, a favorite we've had since new, we have kept it like new.


Rubber seals better to things like radiator necks. Silicone is typically thinner, so less crush under a clamp that will often loosen up sooner. I also found that a lot of off brand silicone hoses are substandard. EPDM Rubber in hoses these days last good too. Modern EPDM rubber hoses are a far cry from rubber hoses of the '60s. A unexplained loss of coolant can often be traced to porous silicone hoses as well, they are permeable, the water permeation rate is 15 times greater than EPDM rubber. Silicone hoses can handle hotter coolant like 355 degrees F but modern EPDM Rubber is good to like 257 degrees F too.


I'm just saying ... before paying good $$$, research it. I've carefully looked at my '97's hoses and they look / feel new still. Just tighten-check the clamps occasionally. I have a spare set picked up off Ebay hanging on the wall.
 

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The only hoses I'd replace (as a matter of age) on your 2000, are those for Fuel, Vacuum, and the "Smaller" lines for coolant (such as those that go to the carb).


The Larger (~5/8" ID) coolant hoses to the top/bottom of the radiator last forever.


I just replaced the Larger coolant hoses on my 1990... but frankly, I think it was not required, as with the old ones off, they were in perfect condition at 220k miles.
 
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On my GL 1200 hose are in great shape and it is a 85 Aspencade I have had it for 10years now and I believe in don't replace things unless they loo bad or they need to do to leaks or whatever. Just my thoughts .
 

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2000 GL1500SE
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the feedback! I agree with the majority who posted, the hoses are in good shape, so "don't fix what ain't broke!"
 

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If you decide to go with silicone, be sure to use "lined" clamps, and ones that have spring washers under the heads of the tension screws. There is a lot of expansion and contraction with silicone hose. The clamp must adjust to this. We had a lot of cold water leaks in trucks when they first changed from rubber. they solved it by changing to the newer style clamps
 
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