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Vintage Rider
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While I have the entire fuel injection system apart, well at least off the bike, I have most of it back together now, I was looking at where the throttle cables go. Does anyone know why this bike has two cables? It has a "pull" cable, and a "push" cable. The "push" cable really doesn't do anything. The pull cable opens the throttle, and the spring on the air chamber where the throttle linkage is mounted to closes it. If the pull cable were to break, the spring would close the throttle.

The reason I'm asking is because my '04 Honda Rebel and '02 Vulcan 750 both had dual cable throttles, and I couldn't figure out what they did either. One person on a Rebel forum was having problems with his throttle not closing because the push cable was sticking. I got to looking at mine, and simply could not find a reason for it, so I removed it. The throttle worked much smoother, and snapped back much easier without the drag of the push cable, so I removed it from the Vulcan 750 as well. Same resullts, throttle closed easier. this was a couple of years ago, and I have had no problems with using one cable. My '94 XT225 only came with one throttle cable, and it works fine.


Is there really a need for the push cable on the Goldwing? One thing I am absolutely certain of is it is not a safety device, it is actually safer without it. Binding in this cable could cause the the throttle to not close when released.
 

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Look at the cable again, Jerry. It's not a push cable. It comes in on the opposite side of the throttle twist. It's a pull cable when the throttle grip is forced shut. It is a safety device.
 

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Ok, I see it now. It could be a safety device, unless it sticks. But in order for it to be needed, the main throttle spring would have to break. Also there is the front brake, the kill switch, the clutch, and the ignition switch on the handlebars to shut it down or stop it if the main spring did break. I know many Japanese bikes are made with one throttle cable, so it can't be absolutely essential. I'll probably put it back. I would like to find one for a bike without cruise control though, that uses a one piece cable instead of a 2 piece cable. The more connections and moving parts I can get rid of the better.
 

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Junior Grue
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JerryH wrote:
Ok, I see it now. It could be a safety device, unless it sticks. But in order for it to be needed, the main throttle spring would have to break. Also there is the front brake, the kill switch, the clutch, and the ignition switch on the handlebars to shut it down or stop it if the main spring did break. I know many Japanese bikes are made with one throttle cable, so it can't be absolutely essential. I'll probably put it back. I would like to find one for a bike without cruise control though, that uses a one piece cable instead of a 2 piece cable. The more connections and moving parts I can get rid of the better.
Jerry your starting to see but not completely.
Yes a broken return spring or a stiff pull cable for lack of a better description could hold the throttles open but it is highly unlikely the throttle return cable would fail at the same time and the only failure mode would be something breaking.

Put the darn thing back on or someday you'll be cruising along and as traffic slows and your Wing doesn't when you release the throttle you and your bike end up as hamburger on the rear of the vehicle in front of you.
 

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Ken, some folks run with scissors, don't wear seat belts, ride bikes with shorts and sandals and defeat safety devices on 30 year old motorcycles...

That's when Darwin's theory kicks in.
 

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I always remove safety devices on motorcycles. Not a single one of my bikes has the clutch and sidestand lockout switches on them. I don't need them for the same reason I don't need a neutral light. I learned to ride a LONG time before any of those things come along. Not needing or using those things are a matter of skill, which has to be learned. Many newer riders depend on these devices, and never learned how to ride without them. It's been a looong time ago, but I seem to remember crashing my first bicycle a lot, until my dad took the training wheels off.

I remember a BMW ad from some years back, touting their fairly new antilock brakes, claiming they made the most foolproof motorcycle in the world. A magazine editor took exception to their ad, stating that you need to be careful when you start building motorcycles for fools, you just might wind up with a car. I thought it was funny at the time, but now it's actually coming true.

I'll take my motorcycles without the relish thank you. I can't remember the last time I used a pair of scissors, but I'm pretty sure I didn't cut myself. I do wear seatbelts, and I do wear a helmet and some gear while riding, but I don't ride bikes with safety or emissions devices. That's one of the reasons I won't own a car less than 40 years old, to avoid that crap. Thats also the reason I won't buy a new bike anymore, they are loaded down with safety and emissions crap. The main attraction of motorcycles to me is that they are very basic, elemental machines, an engine and wheels with the parts to connect them together. I have not survived 44 years and over 400,000 miles of riding by being stupid. I just learned to do some things for myself that others depend on the bike to do for them. I will not ride an unsafe motorcycle. The tires, brakes, lights, and all controls get checked out before every ride. But "safety devices" designed specifically to interfere with your ability to control the motorcycle simply go to far.

One of the so called "safety devices" on my 26 year old motorcycle is actually unsafe, as it does interfere with proper control of the bike. That would be the linked brakes. I already have the parts, and intend to convert them back to actual motorcycle brakes. The lever will control both front brakes, and the pedal will control the rear brake. That is the way motorcycles have been built forever, I have no idea what Honda was thinking when they designed the Goldwings brakes, but having only one front disc on a bike of the Goldwing's size and weight is downright dangerous.


I have spent a lot of time on the race track, in cars. Mostly the dragstrip, but I have done some slalom course stuff too. I have been through Bondurant twice. One of my favorite maneuvers in a car is called the "bootleg 180" which requires being able to lock the brakes. I practiced and practiced that until I got it down solid. But guess what? you can't do it in a newer car, for two reasons, one is that you can't lock the brakes, and two, most new cars are front wheel drive.

Anyway, this could go on forever, so I'll just wrap it up. I refuse to own any vehicle that has any device which interferes with my total and absolute control of it, or my ability to tune it as I please.
 

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Vintage Rider
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Ken Bergen wrote:
JerryH wrote:
Ok, I see it now. It could be a safety device, unless it sticks. But in order for it to be needed, the main throttle spring would have to break. Also there is the front brake, the kill switch, the clutch, and the ignition switch on the handlebars to shut it down or stop it if the main spring did break. I know many Japanese bikes are made with one throttle cable, so it can't be absolutely essential. I'll probably put it back. I would like to find one for a bike without cruise control though, that uses a one piece cable instead of a 2 piece cable. The more connections and moving parts I can get rid of the better.
Jerry your starting to see but not completely.
Yes a broken return spring or a stiff pull cable for lack of a better description could hold the throttles open but it is highly unlikely the throttle return cable would fail at the same time and the only failure mode would be something breaking.

Put the darn thing back on or someday you'll be cruising along and as traffic slows and your Wing doesn't when you release the throttle you and your bike end up as hamburger on the rear of the vehicle in front of you.
Wouldn't the proper procedure be to hit the kill switch, pull in the clutch, and apply the brakes, all at the same time? It should be easy, if you are maintaining a safe following distance. I rode an old Triumph, with drum brakes, for about 3 years. During that time, it must have broken a dozen throttle cables, as well as several brake and clutch cables. You always carried spares. And it was really annoying when it happened, but it never caused any accidents. I have never had any cable break on a Japanese bike. But I will put a new one on the Goldwing anyway, since the one thats on there is probably the original and 26 years old. Better safe than sorry.
 
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