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I’m looking to replace my existing brake pads with higher performance pads. The calipers and master cylinders were rebuilt this past winter, and the brake lines were replaced with ss braided lines. I initially installed EBC organicpads but have close to 12K miles on them already. I’m going to replace the pads this winter when I flush out the brake system and replace the fluid with fresh.



Without starting a pissing contest, can anyone comment on the use of sintered pads from DP vs EBC? The DP brand pads specify separate part numbers for front and rear while EBC /HH pads use the same part number for both front and rear. How will the 2 brands of sintered metal pads affect disc wear vs. stock pads? Is the stopping performance of these “sintered” pads worth the extra effort to do the research and install?



EBC says their pads don’t make dust?? DP makes no mention of dust. Does dust mean that the pads are wearing or that the disc is wearing - or both? What say ye all?
 

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I don't care what two things are in contact both will ware. I've seen plastic twine ware out steel rollars, so brake pads will ware down a rotor.

I'm not sure how EBC says they don't make dust with there normal pads, probably the material from the brake pads is a very small partical, I just don't know. As for what dust means it's the pad braking down and falling off. There will also be some metal from the rotor, but this is a small amount. It should take many pads to ware out a rotor.

I would guess that the reason behind the two different part numbers for the front and rear is that the compound of the front is harder then the rear. A motorcycle transferes weight to the front wheel under braking, and the harder the braking the more weight is transfered, so the front needs extra gripping power. The rear wheel however can be easly over braked, I.E. skiding. The rear pad probably has a material that dosen't grab as hard as the front, so as to help prevent a lockup. This is also why putting BSS lines on the front of a bike is more important then the rear.
 

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boxerdad wrote:
I’m looking to replace my existing brake pads with higher performance pads. The calipers and master cylinders were rebuilt this past winter, and the brake lines were replaced with ss braided lines. I initially installed EBC organicpads but have close to 12K miles on them already. I’m going to replace the pads this winter when I flush out the brake system and replace the fluid with fresh.



Without starting a pissing contest, can anyone comment on the use of sintered pads from DP vs EBC? The DP brand pads specify separate part numbers for front and rear while EBC /HH pads use the same part number for both front and rear. How will the 2 brands of sintered metal pads affect disc wear vs. stock pads? Is the stopping performance of these “sintered” pads worth the extra effort to do the research and install?



EBC says their pads don’t make dust?? DP makes no mention of dust. Does dust mean that the pads are wearing or that the disc is wearing - or both? What say ye all?
Boxerdad, WELL!_ that is a difficult question to answer without knowing your riding style & stopping technique..

I run sintered aggressive metallic pads on my personal GL 1200 but it is taking a toll on my brake rotors as they are scoring up pretty good.. If you ride hard enough to take advantageofan aggressive type pad & don't mind the rotor wear then they are a godsend for REPEATED hard stops from 90+ mph.. Mostpad suppliers don't recommend an aggressive brake pad on the rear brakes of a motorcycle as is is very easy to lock up the rear brake under hard stops, or on wet roads.. A locked up rear brake on a motorcycle is very dangerous as it should remain locked until the bike is slowed way down or you risk an instantaneous high side if the rear brake is released at speed..

If youare just a touring type rider or go easy on the brakes with not toomany severe stops from very high speeds then an organic or Kevlar pad will work out just fine & will be a lot easier on the brake rotors..

I haven't ever seenthem offered for the older GoldWings but I have been running Carbon brake pads on my Harley Electra Glide since they became available a few years ago.. In my estimation those pads are a great compromise between severe high speed stopping ability & easy on the rotors softer compound.. They also decreased my lever pressure for the same stopping power.. The only downside so far is increased black brake dust on the rims & brake calipers.. Still I would put them (SBS carbon) on my Honda in a minute if I could find a decent set..

Most brake dust is caused by brake pad wear.. ALL brake pads make some brake dust, some more than others.. Metallic brake pads can make a very caustic type of brake dust that will pit an aluminumwheel pretty fastaround moisture or moist air if not kept washed off the wheel..

If you are just looking for a good long wearing pad with little rotor wear then an organic type pad is probably best for you.. The newer Kevlar compounds seem to be working out pretty good for most applications.. You can go to a little more aggressive compound but then you risk brake lock-up or difficult to modulate brake apply on wet or slippery roads..

If you are a high speed rider in heavy traffic, or make many stops from high speeds, or do a lot of track days, then you might be better off with a metallic pad with a little more aggressive compound..

I haven't done much research on the compounds available for the 1200 Wing but those same pads do fit a few higher performance bikes so there should be something available out there if you read between the lines & are willing to experiment..



Twisty
 

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Boxerdad,

as a former mechanic, my preference is to stay away from sintered brake pads. They make alot more noise and wear the hell out of your rotors, as mentioned by twisty. I bought EBC pads for my Goldwing a couple of summers ago and believe me, they produce brake dust. You are correct about the dust. Itresults from normal wear of the pads. Check out the front wheels of a car and you would probably will see a dark color, sometimes reddish, from brake dust. I plan on checkinginto some organic pads next time. There is a seller on ebay that seems to be reasonable, althought I have not had time to check his feedback. The link is as follows:

http://stores.ebay.com/BrakePlanet

Wendell
 

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Since I'm a relatively conservative rider I prefer EBC organic pads because pads are cheaper than brake disks.
 

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Gentlemen:

Based on the information you've imparted, I'll be staying with organic pads!! Thank You all for your responses!

BOXERDAD
 

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hmmmm. I just put sintered pads on one of my bikes.... I am certainly rethinking that now, because, as exavid says, pads are cheaper than rotors
 

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Anyone know if they make ceramic pads for wings? I am running them on 2 vans and on my Explorer and they are great there. It takes almost a month to get a light brown dust on the wheels that washes right off.

Chris
 
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