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Have a slow leak in my back tire. Or maybe not so slow - put 40 psi in the morning, next morning is about 25 psi. Anyway, unless I find that the valve insert is the problem, what are my options? The tire is at about 50% wear. The local auto tire shop fixes flats for free, but I doubt I'll find that sort of deal for a scoot.
 

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I'd check to make sure it's not your valve stem, valve core, or tire-rim interface that's leaking.

With that amount of air coming out you should be able to spot the leak with a soapy solution of water.

If it isthe tire, then yes I would replace it or at least repair the leak.
 

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Put some dish soap in a spray bottle and spray the tire and see if bubbles appear anywear on tire or stem or rim? Check tire real good for a small nail or slice ?

"Ride -on" Tire slime does work and doesn't ruin the rim like some other brands?!I prefer to get the tire fixed ?:baffled:
 

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Fully expected the above precedures to reveal the leak. Set the bike on the center stand, put a pan of soapy water under the tire, and thoroughly wetted the sidewalls, beads, and valve area with water. Nothing!

I think I will repeat the test with more air pressure in the tire. How many PSI is too much for this short test? Can I put 60 lbs in without blowing the tire?
 

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make sure you spray some directly on top of the valve stem (cap off)... you could be leaking from the end of it. You shouldn't have to overinflate the tire. Normal pressure should reveal the leak.

Also... wet the tire down again and take it off the center stand and put it back on the side stand... you could be leaking from the seal between the tire and the rim and it may only show when there is a diagnonal force on the tire.
 
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Hey hossners :waving:Buy yourself a new Bridgestone and forget about leaks. :clapper:

:weightlifter::18red::weightlifter:
 

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Hi hossners, you can put up to 60psi in for testing without problems. When thyre fitters use air to pop a new tyre on they pump up to 120psi into it. 60psi is safe for a long test. I wouldn't rush out and buy a new tyre just yet, in case the leak is in the vale or wheel rim. You would be sick if you bought a tyre and still had a leak! :blushing:
 

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Jason wrote:
Hi hossners, you can put up to 60psi in for testing without problems. When thyre fitters use air to pop a new tyre on they pump up to 120psi into it. 60psi is safe for a long test. I wouldn't rush out and buy a new tyre just yet, in case the leak is in the vale or wheel rim. You would be sick if you bought a tyre and still had a leak! :blushing:
Sensible advice man. Check the cheap things first! :goofygrin:
 

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englishted wrote:
Jason wrote:
Hi hossners, you can put up to 60psi in for testing without problems. When thyre fitters use air to pop a new tyre on they pump up to 120psi into it. 60psi is safe for a long test. I wouldn't rush out and buy a new tyre just yet, in case the leak is in the vale or wheel rim. You would be sick if you bought a tyre and still had a leak! :blushing:
Sensible advice man. Check the cheap things first! :goofygrin:
I noticed with my new Elite IIIs, Dunlop recommends not to go over 50psi to set the bead. If I thought anyone ran 120psi into them I don't think I'd want the tire. Using soap solution is a good way to hunt leaks, take a soft brush wetted well in the stuff and work it over the tread. It's sometimes difficult to find leaks in the tread grooves.
 

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After you make sure it's not the valve stem or core, replace the tire.

Have you ever ridden a flat outfrom the center lane of the freeway at rush hour in a major city...replace the tire.
 

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I'm with you Tony, better safe than sorry !!:baffled:
 

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Tonys96 wrote:
After you make sure it's not the valve stem or core, replace the tire.

Have you ever ridden a flat outfrom the center lane of the freeway at rush hour in a major city...replace the tire.

I have to agree. One beautiful, sunny Saturday morning this past April I was heading up the interstate on my '83 1100i at freeway speeds and noticed something bouncing down the road in front of me that suspiciously resembled a valve stem. I was in the center lane and began to slow (brakes and gears combined) as I pulled into the breakdown lane. At approximately 40 MPH the front of my bike started to bob and weave and it was all I could do to hold onto the handlebars.



When I thought I couldn't ride it out anymore I decided soft dirt is better than hard pavement and moved into the grass. Sadly, the ground was so soft that the front forks dug in and the bike stopped. I didn't. Pigs may not fly but I know of one that bounced.



Bent forks, broken cockpit, damage to bearing head, damaged fairing (I removed the windscreen flying through it) and sadly, a totalled bike. If I had been in better financial condition I would have kept it to break out or even repair as a project. Instead I used the settlement to buy an'85 Aspencade w/trailer.



I was wearing my helmet (by choice, your own decision) and was glad that I only suffered a single fractured rib. Am now considering switching to metal valve stems when I replace tires. Any thoughts on the switch?
 

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Nasty business but pretty rare. Don't know if an all metal stem would be better but for you if it gives a psychological boost, why not?
 
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Tonys96 wrote:
After you make sure it's not the valve stem or core, replace the tire.
Thats what i said two days ago. :clapper:

:leprechaun::18red::leprechaun:
 
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GWNorman wrote:
Sometimes just putting something like Ultraseal in the tyre fixes these mystery leaks for good.
Or Punctureseal. :clapper:

:leprechaun::18red::leprechaun:
 

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Punctureseal is the one most of us seem to use. Maybe Ultraseal is the same, it's hard to know.
 
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Well my neighbour uses Punctureseal and he says it's the best. :clapper:

:leprechaun::18red::leprechaun:
 
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