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Ihave noticed a couple of times now in the couple of weeks of ownership of my 86 Aspen that,when Istart up after a short stop she can be very smokey for about 10 - 15secs. I take it this is not a good sign :?. Any answers don't scare me toooo much!

:11blue:
 

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:waving:

Hi Peninsula Winger.

Me again, Yea I had the same problem on my 1100 Interstate. It had 54000 miles on it, what kind of mileage is on yours.?

Because it is a flat four, a small amount of oil finds its way into the cylinders, and gets burnt off when you start up. If your plugs are a bit oily it is getting a bit too much. My plugs were always a normal colour. If coolant is getting into the cylinders, that is serious sh**.

Keep a very close watch on both levels, ie oil and coolant.

Tom is the real guru on wings, Steve should be able to put you in contact with him.

Regards

Brown Bear.
 

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If you leave your bike on the sidestand instead of the centerstand this is very common and nothing to worry about. Some oil will seep into the left cylinders when it's on the sidestand and cause the smoke you described.

When I leave my bike for extended periods, more than a few hours, I usually put it on the centerstand to avoid the smoke.

If the bike smokes after sitting on the centerstand, check the oil level, it might be too high.

If it smokes after just a few minutes, your rings might be a bit worn or just not seated properly after long storage. Givethe rings some time to re-seat.
 

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Smoking after startup after parking on the kick stand is usually due to worn valve stem seals. If it doesn't do it after parking on the center stand that's a pretty good bet.
 

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exavid wrote:
Smoking after startup after parking on the kick stand is usually due to worn valve stem seals. If it doesn't do it after parking on the center stand that's a pretty good bet.
Valve stem seals. Its common on all the models up to at least the gL1500. It's down to the seals hardening with age and is not mileage related. I haven't seen any older 1800s do this yet, so Honda must have got the seals right on them.
 

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yellowwing wrote:
exavid wrote:
Smoking after startup after parking on the kick stand is usually due to worn valve stem seals. If it doesn't do it after parking on the center stand that's a pretty good bet.
Valve stem seals. Its common on all the models up to at least the gL1500. It's down to the seals hardening with age and is not mileage related. I haven't seen any older 1800s do this yet, so Honda must have got the seals right on them.
To me it seems more likely to be the rings... for it to be the valve stem seals, oil would have to migrate all the way into, and pool in the valvecovers before entering through the valve stem seals (lower, exhaust valves).

Another reason I'm thinking piston rings is that after sitting for years, my bike would smoke after sitting for just a few minutes on the sidestand, but after riding it for 1000 miles or so, it doesn't do it anymore.

I guess one way to check this would be to pull the valve cover on the left sideto see if there's more than the usual couple ounces of oil in there.
 

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If the bike only smokes for 10-15 seconds thenI'd go along withworn valve seals. It only takes one or two drops of oil to make it's way down past the seals in one cylinder to smoke. Don't forget that oil will drip from all over the inside of the covers and head area and it only takes a drop of oil to film it's way down the valve and into the cylinder.
A spoonful of oil in the cylnder is enough to make a Wing smoke for a couple of miles. The valve seals in all the Goldwings right up to and including all the GL1500's are not the best in my opinion. Most of the seals I've replaced on them were in bad shape (even with low miles), small cracks and splits. The rubber on them just seems to go hard and brittle with age, usually smoking after as little as three years. You really have to see the state of the seals to believe it.
Of course I'm not ruling out worn valves either. That would cause smoke on start-up as well. I'm assuming that the 1200 in question isn't emitting any odd noises from the heads that would indicate sloppy valves. You can check them for side-play when doing the seals anyway.

On the upside, the seals on the GL1800 seem to be better. I replaced the shims on a '01 with 38,000 miles late last year and I had a good look at the seals. I'm no expert on rubber types, but the seals on the GL1800 seem to be more supple thanthose on previous models.
 

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Generally on the Goldwings, start-up smoking is caused by poor stem seals on the valves. The seals deteriorate with time, become brittle and do not grip the stem anymore. If the smoking goes away after a short time, and you are not pumping smoke out the exhaust while driving, then the seals are gone. However, if the bike smokes all the time, whether a little or a lot, the oil rings are shot. A compression test will not reveal bad oil rings.

Quick test: Pull a valve cover, pull the keeper & spring on one valve. Move the valve stem up and down in the guide and attempt to wiggle it at the same time.. If movement is very easy, and you can see the stem move away from the seal lip.. The seal is worn... Also, the seal should be soft and plyable.. If it is hard, the seals are no longer gripping the stem...

The job should only take about an hour or so, and won't cost you anything but time.:12beige:
 

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Peninsula Winger wrote:
Ihave noticed a couple of times now in the couple of weeks of ownership of my 86 Aspen that,when Istart up after a short stop she can be very smokey for about 10 - 15secs. I take it this is not a good sign :?. Any answers don't scare me toooo much!

:11blue:
Any chance you are using a fuel system cleaner or additive? Any additives like Sea Foam or fuel system cleaner or the like will cause quite a bit of smoke on start up.



Twisty
 
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brown bear wrote:
Tom is the real guru on wings, Steve should be able to put you in contact with him.
Hey brown bear :gunhead: I dont know Tom is he a member of this forum.? :stumped:All the "Gurus" on this forum are REAL :jumper:and could build a Goldwing from the ground up. :weightlifter: Now would you please update your profile and complete the LOCATION section and tell us what country you live in. :whip:

:stumped: :18red: :stumped:
 

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Peninsula Winger wrote:
Ihave noticed a couple of times now in the couple of weeks of ownership of my 86 Aspen that,when Istart up after a short stop she can be very smokey for about 10 - 15secs. I take it this is not a good sign :?. Any answers don't scare me toooo much!

:11blue:
It's valve seals, if I was inclined to bet on it I would. It's common on all Wings and has been discussed countless times. If the smoke clears up so quickly as you say, then don't worry about it at all.
 

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Hey RENAGADE can you tell me if you have to pressurize the cylinders on a 1982 gl1100 to replace the valve seals-thanks Craiga
 

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Mr.1200 wrote:
I have not seen any information on weather you are to screw in the dip stick,or leave it out as I do for a proper fill level? But it certainly has stopped the start up smoke,doing it my way..and that's a good thing...So you might want to drain off a bit,and give this a try,and see if it helps any of you?
In the owner's manual on my SEI and my 1500 and in the Honda Shop manual it says to measure the oil level without screwing the stick in. Also If you change the oil and measure in 3.9 quarts, when you screw the stick in it's going to show well above the proper amount. I don't think leaving the oil level a little low is all that bad a practice if it stops you bike from smoking as long as it's checked often. That was standard practice on Lycoming and Continental flat four aircraft engines, these engines took eight quarts but if you put all eight in they'd just throw the top quart out in a few hours, if you filled it a quart low the level would hold pretty well until the next change. I wouldn't do it to any engine that was using significant oil, but it won't hurt if you check the level often.
 

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CRAIGA wrote:
Hey RENAGADE can you tell me if you have to pressurize the cylinders on a 1982 gl1100 to replace the valve seals-thanks Craiga
There's always the old fashioned way, feed some cord down the spark plug hole then hand turn the crank until the piston pushes the cord up against the valve faces locking them in place.
 

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Yes craiga, I do pressurize the cylinders with compressed air. However, before I obtained a compressor and the adapters (which I manufactured), I used nylon rope.. The kind you can burn the ends on to melt them. The 1/4 inc diameter worked fine just stuffing it into the cylinder thru the spark plug hole and leaving one end exposed so you can pull it out after re-assembling the valve spring & keepers. Like Exavid says, just rotate the crankshaft (by hand) until that piston goes top dead center and the rope will hold the valves closed. Then, just counter rotate the crank shaft when you're done and pull the rope out.. Easy...

I now use compressed air because it also tells me the condition of the cylinder and valve seat at the same time. Air hissing thru the exhaust pipe or carburetor indicates bad valve seats, while hissing into the engine block indicates bad rings,, AND bubbles coming up into the radiator indicates a cracked block or blown head gasket...

Hope this helps...
 

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I've used both ways to hold valves in place and like using rope on small engines. For one thing it doesn't take a lot of rope stuffed in there. The other thing I like is that you can back off the crank a wee bit and test the valves by hand for slop and free turning if you have the springs off. As Renegade says though there is other information you can gather with air pressure. I have a adapter I made from an old spark plug and an air hose adapter to shoot the air in. Be careful when you hit the air, the crank might make a fast half turn to BDC.

Old spark plugs come in handy, I used the shell of one, brazed in a small steel tube, and fitted a short rod that slips nicely in the tube for a TDC finder. You screw the modified plug into the cylinder, slip in the rod and feel for TDC as you hand turn the crank. I've used it a couple times when either an engine I was working on didn't have reliable marks or I couldn't find them.
 

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I have a 79 wing that smokes but Im getting oil into my air filter box and it appears to come from the crankcase breather hose, the small holding tank on the other hose seems to fill up quick to, Im lost
 
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