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1982 1100 interstate. Got her into great shape with the usual flushing and checking and replacing. After I flushed and bleed the front brake lines it sure feels like there might be a tiny amount of air somewhere in the line. I have repeated the procedure now multiple times and it is driving me crazy. I want to feel secure stopping the 800 pound beast! Is there a trick to doing this? It isn't my first time working on brakes - first time on a wing. I tried thumping along the lines up to the tee - still soft :?. Even tried something a buddy at work suggested - opening the connection right at the master reservoir. :gunhead:



Help guys



Mike
 

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Hi Mike. Goldwings always seem to be hard to bleed. There is a good tip mentioned a few times here, where you inject the fluid from the bleed nipple on the caliper right up to the master cylinder (have someone open the line at the master cylinder) until you have nice clean fluid and no air bubbles.
 

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One thing that I read about here (sorry, cant recall who posted it) is that the brake lines can get very soft over time. You end up with spongy feeling brakes because the rubber hose is expanding under the hydrologic pressure........ In other words it may not be air at all that you are chasing.
I feel this is my very problem on my 82 Aspy. Spent a bunch of time bleeding the brakes, new pads, over haul the cylinders, its still spongy and a most of the stopping action happens with the lever way too close to the hand grip for my liking.
The cure? Replace the rubber lines from the mater cylinder to the splitter and from the splitter to each front caliper. Be careful if you go with the hot looking (to some) braided stainless steel, as it might rub and cut the plastic faring.
From what I hear on this forum, once you do this, your brakes will frighten you with their stopping power.
Try searching for this topic if I have been a little vague.
(You might also consider doing the back brake line at the same time)

Ben.
 

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mjohnson, if the brake calipers/pistons are corroded and/or sticky they can sometimes make bleeding difficult. If that's all in good shape try tapping on the calipers with a plastic hammer to help loosen any air bubbles that may be sticking to the pistons. Once you get a solid enough feel to drive safely you can find some rough roads to drive on then come back and do the bleeding again as most of the air remaining will have risen to the the top so you could let it all escape at the master cylinder fitting.

astrotlv, stainless steel braided brake hoses will help to give a better brake feel, but, they will only increase braking power if the original brake hoses balloon enough to allow the lever/pedal to reach their mechanical stops.

Vic
 

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could very well be a bubble... sometimes these get caught where there are connections, e.g. where the line splits to the two front brakes... or if a brake caliber is aligned so there is a place higher than the bleeder hole. or even at the connection to the master cylinder itself if there is a "high point" I have never used, but some have recommended reverse bleeders which push the fluid from the lower bledder screw up back through the system.
 
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