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a couple days ago on the way home i smelled the good ole wires burning smell, you know what i mean, the most dreaded smell there is when riding a wing, then i looked around and saw smoke in the air so i passed it off as something on fire around the area somewhere, well tonight the battery went dead as i pulled in the driveway (thank god it was at home) so i jumped it off and drove it on in the shop, hooked it to the battery charger and put it on a 2 amp charge for the night, then i figured i better check the stator wires and found 1 burned in 2, i tried to get some solder to stick to it but that was not happening so i put a yellow butt connector in it for tomorrow now my question is, how do you guys get solder to stick to the wires?
 

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Still Learning
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Cut off the bad wire and splice in new. Have you eliminated the clear connector as that is a big problem area that causes the meltdowns and frying the stators
 

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1. was this on your 1100?

2. if so are you talking about the 3 yellow wires that go to a plug on the left side of the bike behind the side panel, held by a bracket?

3. If so, I wire nutted mine 7 years ago and they have been great ever since, just make sure you phase them correctly, they are 3 phase, because on an 1100 a new stator is an "engine out" job.
 

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Dan
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Had the same problem soldering mine.. I had to cut all the way back to clean wire and then solder would stick. I think I cut out about 5” to 6” off each one around the clear connector and added new wire.
 

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The trick to soldering wire is, as already mentioned, having clean and not blued wire so cut back to clean shiny wire. Actually the phase of the wires isn't important you can wire any combination of the three wires together as long as you have three wires from the stator to the regulator. The system really isn't three phase at the regulator end so you'll get the same voltage whatever the order of the wires are. I splice out this connector using a Western Union twisted splice and then solder. I also use shrink tubing over the connections to help keep water out. A bit of dielectric grease on the soldered joint and a shrink tube over that will keep things nice and dry.
 

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exavid wrote:
The trick to soldering wire is, as already mentioned, having clean and not blued wire so cut back to clean shiny wire. Actually the phase of the wires isn't important you can wire any combination of the three wires together as long as you have three wires from the stator to the regulator. The system really isn't three phase at the regulator end so you'll get the same voltage whatever the order of the wires are. I splice out this connector using a Western Union twisted splice and then solder. I also use shrink tubing over the connections to help keep water out. A bit of dielectric grease on the soldered joint and a shrink tube over that will keep things nice and dry.
Man, thanks a lot, I learned something new there, I worried about mine a lot when I did it! :applause:
 

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One thing I've not seen mentioned is that you can clean the wires if they are not too badly burn't! Strip the wire about 1", "fan" the strands out and useing some grey scotchbrite or fine steel wool, put some on the top and bottom of the fan next to the insulation press lightly together and pull it to the end of the wire. The respread/fan the wire and repeat till the wire is nice and shiny and then use alcohol to wash the loose corrosion off and go from there.



Try it!! It's worked for me!!:cool:
 

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I didn't soldier, but I cut back as far as I could then crimped on push-pull connectors using 10 guage wire, I have no heat problems at all.
 

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Armo wrote:
I didn't soldier, but I cut back as far as I could then crimped on push-pull connectors using 10 guage wire, I have no heat problems at all.
The 10gauge wire is over kill but will work.
If the origanal 14gauge wire lasted 25+ years it was adequate enough to carry the current and it was the connectors that failed not the wires.

Besides that you have 14gauge wire attached to both ends of your 10gauge wire. Does it over heat or does it still look good after 25+ years?
 

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You could also use some soldier flux on the wires before soldering. It will make the soldier flow better.
 

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Bamaeagle wrote:
You could also use some soldier flux on the wires before soldering. It will make the soldier flow better.
Flux is of course necessary for soldering but it doesn't help on corroded wires, they have to cleaned down to the copper first.
 

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Don't use acid flux on electrical wiring. Most common fluxes available for soldering is acid based and shouldn't be used on wiring especially stranded wire because it can't easily be cleaned off after soldering and will corrode the wire. Use a non-corrosive flux if you can find it or rosin cored solder, 60/40 tin lead is best if you can find it.
 

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ok, guess i will be cutting the wire back a little, i thought that was the answer but i wanted the experts to tell me first before i went to cutting, i will be using liquid electrical tape on it when finished,,, aint nothing getting through that stuff
 

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+1 for what Exavid said about flux. It is corrosive and designed for plumbing where the material thickness is more tolerant

Wire nuts are prone to loosen under vibration and they have a copper plated steel spring that will corrode when wet. Steel, copper and water are a bad mix. Taping doesn't help much. I've run immersion tests and failure is measured in seconds.

Heat shrink is good stuff but try to get 3:1 ratio adhesive lined.You can also use hot melt glue to coat the wires and then tape.
 

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As Obama says.."Let me be clear". When copper gets too hot, it changes the molecular structure(sounds like I'm smart,huh?) of the metal. It "anneals" the copper. Now, if you COULD get solder to flow on these overheated wires, and I doubt one could, the wires will have alot of resistance, compared to fresh,clean copper. Do like everyone says, and keep nipping back untill you see nice shiny copper, and soldering will be a cinch. Be sure to use a big enough soldering gun/iron to do the job. An itty bitty soldering iron intended for circut boards and little wires, won't heat up the joint evenly. I use an old beat up Weller soldering gun that's been around for 30 years. I use rosin core solder for all electrical work. Acid core, as already posted, is BAD NEWS for wiring! Good luck, and hope you git er dunn!!! jimsjinx
 

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nobbie, ya ever run emersion test on liquid electric tape?
 

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jimsjinx wrote:
snip.... I use an old beat up Weller soldering gun that's been around for 30 years. I use rosin core solder for all electrical work. Acid core, as already posted, is BAD NEWS for wiring! Good luck, and hope you git er dunn!!! jimsjinx
Hey Jim, those old Weller guns are tough. I still use one I bought at the BX when I was in the USAF about 1960 and it still works great. I've put on many, many heating tips but she still works well.

BTW that is what I soldered my wires with when I cut out the plug on the 85 LTD I used to own.
 

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I first tried 14 ga. and the wires were hot,
Then I tried 12 ga, and the wires were warm,
Then I tried 10 ga and the wires were JUST RIGHT !!
 

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Couple of items to mention...
Yes for sure start with clean wire and in case it hasn't been mentioned use flux and a soldering iron that heats up fast. I use one with a "trigger" as it puts a lot of heat right where you want it rather than heating the whole area. Either way you have to be careful of overheating by using a wet cloth or equivalent. Last be sure your solder tip is cleaned and tinned properly.
Second-I am in full agreement with upsizing the wire in between the regulator and stator. Amperage is not the only thing to consider. Larger wire has more mass and can therefore dissipate the heat better. Additionally lower wire temp means less resistance since resistance varies with temperature. Don't believe it-try both ways. The setup with thicker wires in the middle will be cooler to the touch.
 
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