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I have to ask some questions about rebuilding my Aspencade. I have noticed that alot others have rebuilt a Goldwing with great success. I have family members that think that it will never be a reliable machine.
I have a hard time with those that can only see what is in front of them.

I havenow come to see that my Family Tree, has shown where the nuts are.

I have read in this forum of those who have redone their bikes only to have many, many reliable miles.
Is an 82 Aspencade to old? I know that I do not have a picture of her here yet, for I have had nothing but problems trying to put a picture here. I have spent lots of time with my Honda and that is not what she say to me.

A few questions if I may,
Is it too old to take on a long trip?
Parts are too hard to get when needed on the road?
It was not a good machine when it was new?
You know the more that is said bad about my bike the more that I want to do it.

Thanks for letting me get this off my chest.

LLF




 

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it was a great machine when it was new. if you like her, the best you can do is get her back to brand new condition. as far as New Old Stock Parts, there should be some available. im sure some members who have accomplished this, will stop by and share their part supply stores.
 

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my first wing was an 82 aspencade , i imported it from canada and spent the first winter taking her apart and restoring her to her former glory . she ran like a dream. if i had a garage i would do it again !:)
 

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I've had my '80 1100 Interstate for...well..this is the 20th year. I've put well over 120,000 miles on her personally, and she's still strong as the day she was new.

I wouldn't hesitate to jump on her and head for either coast on a moment's notice.
 

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I have an '80 as well. Over 166,000 miles on her and still going strong. Like any vehicle of that age and mileage it does have the occasional issue. But I wouldn't think twice about heading across the country with her.
 

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If you do the work you will know whats going on with the bike. I have a road side assistance policy just in case and when traveling on the older bikes I will bring a full set of basic tools for the bike. I don't mind taking a bike on trips if I know it's right. If you do the work you will know if your bike is solid enough for the trips you plan. Can things go wrong. Yes, of course just keep some extra cash available for unforeseen repairs. I can't personally comment on GL's because this is my first.



Here's my basic check list for a bike going on a trip new or old.



Is it prone to any certain problems? Can they be prevented?

For instance GL1200 seem prone to stator problems. I'm going to put the poorboys alternator upgrade on before going cross country because this is not a repair I want to pay to have done while traveling.

Meter it out. Check your electrical system just before your trip and make sure everything is in spec.

Tune it up. Check your tuning make sure that it's in tune the best it can be. A well tuned bike is a must especially on older bike. When your bike is in tune it is much easier on those older parts.

Fluids, Make sure your fluids are new or in good shape. I always change my oil, radiator and drive shaft fluids before going on a long trip. Even if it's not time yet.

Review all your previous work. I make sure that everything I have done is holding up.

Full inspection of every aspect of the bike for safety and proper function.

If you feel confident after that it's time to ride.

One last note: Higher mileage to me is the biggest issue. I personally would rebuild an engine with higher mileage before heading across country when buying it from a PO that didn't care for it. Now on a GW high mileageseems to be amatter of how the bike was treated. If your not sure, an engine rebuild may build your confidence in the bikes ability to make a several thousand mile trip trouble free. From my new winger friends I'm finding out that a GW can go nearly forever when treated right but if your buying a Rat Bike like I have inspecting every aspect of it is important because if they didn't take care of it it's likely not been maintained properly so knowing that everything is good is a must.



Good luck, Mines on the road now and I love it.
 

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Just to add to what everyone has already said about the reliability of the 1100's.

I also have an 82 1100 Interstate, just this past spring my son and I rode her from SC all the way to Texas and back during spring break week. My brother came along on his 1500. Never had a problem with the old girl except some bad gas in Texas, cured that with fresh fillup and seafoam.

Next weekend I'm taking a run on her up to SE PA to pick up a 2-person popup camper to pull behind her and also adding a sidecar to her tomorrow.

So get that puppy fixed and grin all the way down the road and tell those family naysayers where to stick it.
:D:D:D:D:cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:
 

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just recently got back from a 4000 mile round trip to montrose co. i rode my 83 1100 and rideing buddie rode his 88 1500. my mileage is 86000 plus. his is around 46000. both bikes never missed a beat. i spent almost 2 years working on my barn find. it had sit alongside a shed for 4 1/2 years out side. so you can say-- my weekends were tied up working on the bike. but it was a fun thing to me. now if i want to go , i can go on a bike i can trust. because i know what it is.
 

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I've been riding for over 30 years. All HD, until now. So I know what an unreliable motorcycle is. The one thing I have never heard of....is an unreliable GoldWing. No such critter.

You go build that thing and then ride it like you're being chased by the devil.
 

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Howdy! Is it to old? Maybe, its what you want that determines that. I have a 82 1100 Aspencade and a 2003 1800. I have putt about the same mileage on both bikes. Both bikes broke down twice. The 82 breaks down in my yard or atleast makes it back home. The 03 breaks down far away. The repair bills for the 2003 would do all the repairs on the 82 and buy it as well! The reverse repair cost alone was $$$2,551.91 ouch! This repair would do alot of dependability work on your machine!
Ride Safe, Ride Smart!
 

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I've had all models of Goldwing except for the 1800 and even though several of the older ones had experienced a lot of neglect in their lives all of them were reliable good riding bikes once their owner induced problems had been cleared up. One nice thing about Oldwings is that you can find them for sale inexpensively so purchasing one and buying the replacement parts they need to bring them back into roadworthy shape isn't prohibitive. In fact buying an older intact Goldwing and refurbishing it is a very inexpensive way to get a great road bike, it might not be the latest thing on the road but it will perform well and keep doing it for many more years.
The main thing in buying an older 'Wing is to consider your experience with things mechanical and the size of your toolbox. If you are an experienced mechanic or want to become one then you can pick up a pretty sadly used bike around $500 or less and restore it. If you aren't as well equipped or want to do less work you can usually find an 1100 or 1200 already in roadworthy condition for a couple thousand dollars. That's a lot of motorcycle for the money.
 

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Thanks for all the replies Gentlemen. I am glad to hear that just like I suspected, "OLDwings" are as good as I thought.
I do not know why when I found that this bike was available, I had to have it. She will be the first bike that I have rebuilt. My first Wing. The only bike that I have ever owned that has saddle bags

As a matter of fact, the only bike I have had that I could carry something on that was not in a knap sack. I have had sport fairings before, but not a full fairing machine. Do you think that I will miss turning into a giant rain drop?

These are the things that I am looking foreword too. On top of the build itself this is just one big gift to myself.

Again Gentlemen,
Thanks
LLF
 

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My favorite place to buy parts from is from http://www.crc2onlinecatalog.com . They have parts from the 60's on up, and if they do not have it, they will get it for you. They are reliable, but their shipping is a little high, But their prices easily make up the difference. I have a 1980 GL1100 for a little over a year and a half now, (Re-Built from the frame up) and I have put 10,000 + miles on it. Uses no oil nor coolant. Great bike, and a 1983 GL1100 Aspencade, (Working out bugs and re-doing as I go) and if Mother Honda cannot get it, these guys can. I believe the vintage Goldwings are very reliable. I have had my 80 for one year, and I'd ride it as far as I can, with no worries whatsoever.
Good Luck,
Just Do It!
Nightrider1
 

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I have a rebuilt (by my own hands) 1981 GL1100i. It was in decent but not good condition when I got her last July (a year ago). I can try to address some of your questions.

Is it too old to take on a long trip?

Not a chance. The Goldwing is designed for touring and once refurbished will stand head and shoulders above anything else on the road. I would not hesitate to take mine cross country if I had the time and funds.

Parts are too hard to get when needed on the road?

Parts can be a problem but they are available from many sources and overnight shipping makes them accessible if needed. Most riders of the older bikes carry a few basics with them like a clutch cable, etc on long trips.

It was not a good machine when it was new?

Absolutely UNTRUE, The Goldwings have always been excellent machines, then and now and will stand up to any comparison that anyone would care to venture.

All that being said there can be a lot of work to get in shape. I have replaced the timing belts, redone and synched the carbs, replaced the wheel bearings front and rear, replaced the brakes front and rear, replaced the tires and repacked the drive unit grease, replaced the drive unit oil, rebuilt the front forks and installed progressive springs.

I still have a small but aggravating oil leak that will be fixed this winter by replacing the heads and gaskets (PO broke one of the valve cover bolt housings in the head). Cosmetically I have added many chrome parts, repaired and painted the entire bike, installed the trunk setback bracket, added a passenger backrest from a 1500, passenger floorboards and added extra lights.

All that last section doesn't make the bike any more or less reliable but it sure looks good.

I hope this helps but don't be afraid to rebuild a fine old girl. They will not let you down and you will have one sweet ride when you are done. In this last year + I have put over 12000 miles on mine, ride it daily to work (weather permitting) and would take off tomorrow anywhere even with that annoying oil leak.
 

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80 GL1100 - Currently in refurbishment, purchased with 54k miles.

My experience? Engine was solid (after much TLC), many other systems need work as a labor of love over some time period. The worst part is undoing the work of clueless PO (or whoever the PO had work on it) - missing/damaged bolts, etc.

But functionally, the bike is about as solid as they come and likely to run for years to come. Not sure if I would ride coast to coast, but certainly wouldn't be afraid to do a long run over several states locally (couple hundred mile radius of home). Would definitely want a tool kit handy, have confidence in the essential systems (electric in particular) - but I would definitely NOT be afraid to let the old boy run.

Good luck and have fun with your new project! :leprechaun:
 

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rb7632 wrote:
I hope this helps but don't be afraid to rebuild a fine old girl. They will not let you down and you will have one sweet ride when you are done.
Excellentreply Bro! I totally agree. Just the fact of knowing the effort you put forth,will give you theconfidence to trust your bike. It's simple: input - output.:cooler:
 

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I rebuilt my 80 GL1100, solid as a rock until the aftermarket head gaskets went south. I rebuilt the whole engine over two months, main and rod bearings, hone and rings, rewound stator; (beefed up), cleaned the starter and new starter clutch parts. The break-in ride was just over 1000KM in two days.

Enjoy the old girl, she will tell you what she likes and needs.

James
 

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My biggest concern with older bikes is the electrical system.

Actually, the bike doesn't have to be that old for the wiring & elec components to cause me concern.



If a rebuild is thorough, it should beclose tonew, but expensive to do right. :action:
 

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Very nice bike rb7632:waving:.


:12red::cool:
Dean
 
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