Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Monkey with a Football
Joined
·
19,237 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

I just bought and assembled the following lift for my 89 GL1500 ($60 US):

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=2792

I assume you approach the bike from the right side with the bike while on the side stand.

What I don't know is where I should try to place the two lift pads to do a safe lift of any special procedures I should use.

Advice anyone? I've never used this type of lift before.

Thanks

--
Rudy
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

Rudy wrote:
I just bought and assembled the following lift for my 89 GL1500 ($60 US):

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=2792

I assume you approach the bike from the right side with the bike while on the side stand.

What I don't know is where I should try to place the two lift pads to do a safe lift of any special procedures I should use.

Advice anyone? I've never used this type of lift before.

Thanks

--
Rudy
I've got two lifts like yours. One is the same one from HF and the other a little more robust one from Sears, I think. The second one came with my 1500 when I bought it. The only complaint I have with the HF one is you need to be careful when you let it down, it comes down kinda fast. On my bike I slide it in from the right, you might have to lift the bike off the side stand a bit to get the lift centered. I put one of the lift pads under the folded side stand about half way between the pivot and the feet and start pumping it up. Keep a grip on your bike to keep it stable until the lift starts the bike on it's way up. Also watch the bike to see it if looks like you're going to have to reposition the bike for better balance. Once I have mine up, I slip a little bench-like thing made out of scrap lumber under either the front or rear tire to prevent the bike from rocking fore and aft while I'm working on it. Snugging the bike to the lift with ratcheting straps is also a good idea. I like the thing, it's been a back saver for me. Some folks insist on replacing the bolts with higher grade steel bolts, but I haven't seen any bending or wear on the original ones. Remember to hang on to your bike's handlebar when lowering, you will find you have to let it down a little at a time and a hand on the bar will help stabilize things and keep if from rocking.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
imported post

I've got a Sealey lift. I usually put a 1.5 inch thick block of wood under the sidestand first and this makes it easier to line up when I slide the lift underneath the engine. The 1500 engine is flat enough for the Sealey rails to sit on level without using wooden shims, but other bike engines might be a real challenge.

One thing I've learned with these lifts is that they are really a compromise. You need to have leveland solid groundto work on, ie not hard mud or tarmac. Also you can't pull and push too hard at the bike even with it tied to the lift. You just need to be careful is all. :waving:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,785 Posts
imported post

I purchased the Sears version of this stand a couple years ago. It made the engine removal for the alternator swap a "One Man" job...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
143 Posts
imported post

that's great guidance, I too have been considering a lift of that style. I was concerned I was compromising safety for money. But knowing from you that it can be done with some careful planning is a relief.



thanks



s
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,350 Posts
imported post

I got one at Sams Club for $88.00. It is well built and has worked very good on every bike I have used on for those of you that don't have a Harbor Freight handy.:cheeky1:
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

I saw a couple of posts on 'that other forum' and there were a couple of guys saying if you didn't have a Pit Bull lift ($$$) or a full length shop lift you were a fool to risk your bike on a junky jack. Well that may be their opinion, but I've used mine a lot and haven't felt like I was near disaster at any time. Of course there are always guys around who tell you that if you aren't using uranium sintered ceramic kevlar coated monomolecular gold plated whats its you are a fool.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,350 Posts
imported post

They must be used properly, safelyand with common sense or you could damage your bike or yourself. Some are better made and more sturdy than others. I have seen some I would not put my bike on. Therealways is danger when jacking up a car or motorcycle and care must be taken even if it is a chrome platedBoss Pit Bull HogSuper Lift!!!:coollep:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,948 Posts
imported post

"Of course there are always guys around who tell you that if you aren't using uranium sintered ceramic kevlar coated monomolecular gold plated whats its you are a fool."

I've used those for years. I can't see much difference than using the carbon saturated,latice structuredbuckyballs tubular cross braces.After reading about the end effects of compatible but inversely proportional materials, I don't feel that the cost is prohibitive to contain the stress values at a nominal rate, not unlike the titanium borites used in laminated sheer structures.

BTW, I really like my Sears lift. As others have stated, be careful and make sure you go slowly and balance the bike. Also, don't forget that when you take a wheel off from either end the balance will change, sometimes dramatically. This is where tying thebike down will help a bunch.

Regards,:angel:

Hobie
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top